The Episcopalians had this place built, but it’s a place for all believers. Services are not held here on Sunday; you are invited to worship here or seek quiet contemplation whenever you like. Ater all, the sky above is the only roof large enough to cover all of God’s followers.

Designed by architect Philip Johnson and featuring a sculpture by Jacques Lipchitz under a shingled parabolic dome, The Roofless Church opened in 1960. You’ll find it in New Harmony, Indiana, on the town’s northernmost east-west street.

The Roofless Church
The Roofless Church
The Roofless Church
The Roofless Church
The Roofless Church
The Roofless Church
The Roofless Church

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Photography, Travel

The Roofless Church

Under the open-air roof of the Roofless Church in New Harmony, Indiana. A photoessay.

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Penn Park

Penn Park
Nikon Nikkormat EL, 35-70mm f/3.3-4.5 Zoom Nikkor
Foma Fomapan 100
2019

When you photograph the world as you experience it, as I do, the places you get to go open you up to new photographic subjects. Sometimes they even provide a seldom-seen view into the world.

I park in a parking garage Downtown right next to the building in which I work. As a man of routine, I drive by open spots every morning to park in this one area at the back of the garage where Level 3 starts to become Level 4. There’s almost always an open spot there. At the end of the workday I never have to try to remember where I parked.

This is the view from there, down an alley called Court Street. How many people ever drive or walk down this alley? Not a fraction as many as drive down Pennsylvania St., down there at the end of the alley. The Penn Park garage announces itself, as it does here, to a relatively small number of people who work Downtown. It’s an exclusive club of sorts, the people who even know those words exist.

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Film Photography

single frame: Penn Park

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I’ve been writing about New Harmony all week — but for those of you here just for the doors, it’s a historic town in the southwestern tip of Indiana. Its founders tried, and failed, to build a utopian society here. Today it’s both a typical small Indiana town and something of an artist’s colony. It makes for a lovely long weekend, as my wife and I found out recently. And now, herewith the doors of New Harmony.

Around New Harmony
Around New Harmony
Around New Harmony
Working Men's Institute
Around New Harmony
Episcopal church
Episcopal church
Opera House
The Roofless Church
Photography

Thursday doors: New Harmony, Indiana

Some of the doors from New Harmony, for the Thursday Doors feature.

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Around New Harmony

Margaret and I try very hard to get away four times a year for a three-day weekend, just the two of us. The concentrated us time really does our marriage good.

Chicago had become our default destination when we decided to mix things up a little. Our last trip, to Bardstown, Kentucky, showed us that small-town outings could be just as fun and much more relaxing.

I’ve always wanted to visit New Harmony, population about 700, in the southwesternmost county in Indiana. I tried once before, on an epic 2007 Spring Break tour with my sons of historic and scenic Indiana places. But it poured down rain the whole time. We drove around the town but never got out of the car.

New Harmony has a fascinating history. Twice in the early 1800s, groups tried to build utopian societies here, one religious and one not. Some of their buildings still stand. We didn’t dig into that during our stay — we wanted to experience New Harmony as it is now and just have a nice time. If you’re interested, this article tells the story in compact form.

A nice time we did have in New Harmony. We rented an 1840s cottage but due to something there being out of order found ourselves upgraded to an enormous four-bedroom house built in about 1860. I’ll share photos of this lovely home in an upcoming post. Renting a house let us bring food with us to make our breakfast and lunch, which let us save a little money, eat more healthfully, and relax through our mornings.

We brought our bikes with us and rode all over this little town, and then halfway through the trip decided it was no trouble really to walk anywhere we wanted to go. We serendipitously enjoyed live music two nights and met many interesting people, some from New Harmony and others visitors just like us.

The only things we wished were different about our trip related to restaurants. Only one restaurant is open in town on Sunday night, and it’s the town’s nicest and most expensive place; we really wanted a light bite in a cozy nook. We also wished menus more easily accommodated our various dietary issues, as we’re used to in the big city.

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Photography, Travel

single frame: Main Street, New Harmony

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All this week I’m sharing single-subject photo series I’ve made.

The very first series I made was of an office building in which I used to work. It was just like any other office building anywhere. But it was the one I walked into every day, and I often had an old camera with me, so I shot it frequently.

I was very happy working here until the big company bought us and ruined everything.

Sunrise across the anonymous office building

Palm Pre

Anonymous Office Building

Polaroid Big Swinger 3000, Fujifilm FP-3000B

Anonymous office building

Olympus Trip 500, Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400

Anonymous office building

Olympus Trip 500, Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400

Anonymous office building

Yashica Electro 35 GSN, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Pentax K1000, 50mm f/2 SMC Pentax-M, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building double exposure

Kodak Tourist, Kodak Plus-X

Anonymous office building

Minolta Hi-Matic 7, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Agfa Optima, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Kodak Pony 135, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Kodak Pony 135, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous Office Building

Canon AF35ML, Fujicolor 200

Double exposure

Argus A2B, Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros

Anonymous office building

Kodak Retina IIa, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Pentax ME, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax, Kodak T-Max 400

Anonymous office building

Kodak Brownie Starmatic, Kodak Portra 160

Anonymous office building

Olympus XA, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Minolta 110 Zoom SLR, Fujifilm Superia 200 (expired 12/2003)

Anonymous office building

Olympus Stylus Epic Zoom 80, Kodak T-Max 400

Anonymous office building

Nikon N65, 28-80 mm f/3.3-5.6 AF Nikkor, Fujicolor 200

Psychedelic anonymous office building

Argus Matchmatic C3, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Polaroid Automatic 250, Fujifilm FP3000-B

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Photography

Anonymous office building

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All this week I’m sharing single-subject photo series I’ve made.

The subject I’ve photographed by far most often is the shed at my old house. It was certainly easy to reach: just step out the back door.

It was in middling shape when I moved in, and it deteriorated from there. I finally invested in stabilizing and repairing the structure, at which time its blue hue gave way to tan.

All week I’ve shared pretty much every photo of each subject, but not this time, as I photographed the shed a whopping 51 times. Here are the 28 I think are most interesting — to the extent a shed is interesting. These are roughly in chronological order.

My barn

Kodak Signet 40, Fujicolor 200

Barn door

Kodak Signet 40, Fujicolor 200

Barn

Minolta Hi-Matic 7, Fujicolor 200

Shed double exposure

Kodak Tourist, Kodak Plus-X.

Barn

Pentax ME, 28mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-M, Kodak Ektar 100

Barn

Ansco B2 Speedex, Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros

Barn

Canon Dial 35-2, Fujicolor 200

Barn

Yashica-D, Kodak E100G

Shed

Voigtländer Vitoret LR, Arista Premium 400

My shed

Canon Canonet Junior, Kodak Gold 200 (found in camera, expired)

Shed redux redux

Kodak Monitor Six-20, Kodak Gold 200 (expired, processed as b/w by mistake)

Shed

Kodak Brownie Starmatic, Efke 100

Shed

Olympus Stylus, Kodak Gold 200 (expired)

Shed at dusk

Polaroid Colorpack II, Fujicolor FP-100C

Shed

Yashica Lynx 14e, Kodak T-Max 400

Open Shed

Polaroid Big Swinger 3000, Fujifilm FP-3000B

Shed and Brush Pile

Polaroid Big Swinger 3000, Fujifilm FP-3000B

Shed Again

Olympus 35RC, Fujicolor 200

Shed

Kodak 35, Kodak Plus-X (expired)

Goodbye, ash trees

Canon PowerShot S95

Shed

Minolta Maxxum 7000, 50mm f/1.7 Maxxum AF, Fujifilm Fujicolor 200

Locked

Nikon N90s, 50mm f/1.8 AF Nikkor, Eastman Double-X 5222

Shed

Yashica-12, Kodak Tri-X 400

Shed with a light leak

Pentax IQZoom EZY, Kodak Gold 400

Shed

Minolta AF-Sv, Fujicolor 200

Fence gate top

Nikon FA, 50mm f/1.8 Nikon Series E, Fomapan 200

Shed

Argus C3, Fujicolor 200

My shed

Pentax Spotmatic F, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Takumar, Konica Chrome Centuria 200 (x 12/2003)

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Photography

My old shed

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