I’ve had a lot of insomnia over the last three weeks. We’re still dealing with challenging stuff at home and this is the latest way the stress is manifesting itself in my body. I saw my doctor the other day about getting back to sleep and I’m working the plan we came up with.

I haven’t been blogging much. You can’t tell because I post up to three weeks in advance. But the posting queue was nearly empty. I normally blog in the morning while I eat my breakfast, but not lately. Sometimes it’s because I’m in bed until the last possible minute so I’m less zombie-like at work. The rest of the time I’m just too damn tired.

I miss a lot of things about my old house: the gardens, grilling on the deck, enjoying the way I’d decorated the place. Margaret and I have had to focus on elderly parents, children, and work so much that we find ourselves unable to make our house a home and enjoy everyday life here.

Our home is typical of modern suburban subdivisions, with acres of vinyl siding and not enough windows. Our house backs up to I-65 and a new Toyota dealership was recently built between us and the highway. We’re blessed to be here but I do wish for an older home in town.

But zomg (as the kids all say) do we ever get spectacular sunsets here.

To fill the posting queue with stuff that’s easy for me and, I hope, interesting for you, all this week I’ll be sharing series of photos I’ve made of single subjects. I begin today with Sunset over the Toyota Dealer.

Sunset over the Toyota dealer

Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5/6 SMC Pentax DA-AL

Dealership

Pentax ME, 50mm f/1.7 SMC Pentax-M, Kodak Gold 200

Sunset over the Toyota dealer

Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5/6 SMC Pentax DA-AL

Sunset over the Toyota dealer

Apple iPhone 6s

The many moods of the Toyota sign

Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5/6 SMC Pentax DA-AL

The many moods of the Toyota sign

Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5/6 SMC Pentax DA-AL

Sunset over the Toyota dealer

Pentax H3, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Takumar, Agfa Vista 200

Sunset over the Toyota dealer

Pentax Spotmatic F, 35mm f/3.5 Super-Multi-Coated Takumar, Kodak Ektar 100

Sunset over the Toyota dealer

Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5/6 SMC Pentax DA-AL

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Photography

Sunset over the Toyota dealer

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Dartmouth Apartments

Dartmouth Apartments
Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SMC Pentax DA AL
2019

We came upon this interesting apartment building as we walked along Michigan Street, which is not to be confused with Michigan Road, in Downtown Indianapolis.

I noticed the texture of the brick and how the sky was reflecting in the windows. I knew there was an interesting composition in here somewhere. But we had a destination in mind, and I didn’t have time to frame this building from a bunch of vantage points to find the best composition.

So I quickly tossed off a shot. Sometimes that’s just the ticket. I’m sure there was a better composition in this scene somewhere, but I might have had to take fifty photographs to find it.

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Film Photography

single frame: Dartmouth Apartments

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Satellite reflected in the Camaro

Satellite reflected in the Camaro
Nikon N90s, 50mm f/1.8 AF Nikkor
Fujifilm Fujicolor Industrial 100
2019

One more photo from the Cars and Coffee, on that delightful Fujicolor Industrial 100. This ’67 Chevy Camaro reflects a neighboring ’66 Plymouth Satellite beautifully.

I’ve always wondered why Plymouth named its top-trim midsize sedan Satellite. The car always seemed down to earth to me.

If you’d like to try Fujicolor Industrial 100, get it from Analogue Wonderland here. Analogue Wonderland sent me this roll in exchange for this mention.

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Film Photography, Old Cars

single frame: Satellite reflected in the Camaro

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427

427 Turbo Jet
Nikon N90s, 50mm f/1.8 AF Nikkor
Fujifilm Fujicolor Industrial 100
2019

This is my favorite photo from the Cars and Coffee I went to recently. This 1966 Chevrolet was a low-line Biscayne with rubber floor mats and no radio. It also had neither air conditioning nor power accessories, but that was pretty common then.

What it lacked in amenities, it made up for in sheer cubic inches. The monster big-block 427 was under this Biscayne’s hood. A four-speed Hurst shifter sticks up out of the floor. I’ll bet this thing is a terror to drive.

This car was indoors — a real challenge for the ISO 100 Fujicolor Industrial. Fortunately, I had a fast lens and a steady hand. I counted on shallow depth of field and I got it.

This post is sponsored by Analogue Wonderland, which offers more than 200 films. You can buy Fujicolor Industrial 100 from them here.

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Film Photography, Old Cars

single frame: 427 Turbo Jet

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Supra

Supra
Olympus Trip 35
Kodak ColorPlus
2019

In college, one of my roommates had one of these. He bought it new in 1985. It was a hell of a car for a college freshman to own, and he was very happy with it.

I got to drive it once. He and I had been at a bar in town and where I had just one beer he had three. He was always extra careful when he’d been drinking, so he handed me the keys.

This car is super low, so much so that oncoming cars’ headlights shone directly into my eyes as if they were high beams. I don’t know how fast it would go as I drove it only over city streets near the speed limit. But I remember its stiff chassis and excellent clutch and shifter.

I shot this on Kodak ColorPlus, which was provided by Analogue Wonderland in exchange for this mention. You can buy ColorPlus from them here.

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Film Photography, Old Cars

single frame: Supra

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1957 Chevrolet Bel Air

Chevy crest
Canon PowerShot S95
2019

My little Canon S95 is still a great camera, nine years after it was manufactured. It may be showing its age, though. Native colors aren’t as vivid and everything is a little hazy now. So I shoot in Positive color mode, which is supposed to mimic color slide film. And then in Photoshop I use the Auto Tone correction and boost contrast a little. But that’s not an onerous amount of processing. And look at the result!

This Chevy crest is from a 1957 Bel Air, one of the most over-photographed automobiles of all time. Yet even on a cliche subject, when you move in close you can find something interesting.

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Old Cars

single frame: Chevy crest

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