Old farmstead

Old farmstead
Sears KSX-P
50mm f/1.7 Auto Sears MC
Foma Fomapan 400
L110, Dilution B

The subdivision where I live used to be a farm, run by the Ottinger family. I know the family’s name only because the park at the center of our subdivision is named for the family, and a sign posted there tells a little of the story.

When you enter our subdivision at its main entrance, an old farmhouse stands on the right. A family still lives there; who knows, it might still be the Ottingers. This is their driveway and some of their outbuildings.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Old farmstead

What is probably the original farmstead of the farm that became the subdivision I live in.

Image
Bauble in the window

Bauble in the window
Nikon Df
50mm f/1.8 AF-S Nikkor Special Edition
2021

Margaret and I went Downtown for a photo walk a few weeks ago. Lots of people were out, and it was wonderful to be among them after so long cooped up at home.

We window shopped along popular Massachusetts Avenue. She was drawn to this charming necklace. I went back Downtown a few days later and bought it for her, for her birthday. She never reads my blog, so I’m not tipping her off here!

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Photography

single frame: Bauble in the window

Something spotted while window shopping.

Image
Sign to Mexico, Indiana

This way to Mexico
Kodak EasyShare Z730
2007

I didn’t make a trip to Texas to make this photograph. Rather, I drove to northern Indiana.

I don’t know how the town of Mexico, Indiana, got its name. All I know is that it was right on US 31 for a lot of years, until Indiana decided to move it and widen it to four divided lanes in the late 60s or early 70s. The new highway bypassed tiny Mexico, and I’m sure through traffic dried up instantly.

You’ll find this sign along current US 31 at a crossroads with Mexico’s Main Street. If you follow this sign, you’ll find that there’s not much to Mexico.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Photography

single frame: This way to Mexico

A giant sign pointing to a tiny town in northern Indiana.

Image
Unknown U.S. Soldier

Some gave all
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8/2006)

2019

Remembering those who died in service to our nation.

Film Photography

single frame: Some gave all

Reflecting on this Memorial Day.

Image
Macro statuettes

Curious lizard
Olympus OM-2n
50mm f/3.5 Zuiko Auto Macro
Ilford Delta 400
LegacyPro L110, Dilution B
2021

Here’s another photo from the Ruins at Holliday Park in Indianapolis. They renovated it a few years ago — it had been in serious disrepair — and in so doing added a water feature with a bunch of little amphibious statuettes. Like this one.

I like this little guy. He looks so curious. At the right angle he almost looks like he’s smiling.

I don’t have too much trouble with dust and debris settling on my film while it dries after development. I’m fortunate. But Ilford Delta 400 attracts more dust and debris than most other films I use. I don’t know why! It took me a while to remove all the spots from the images on this roll. But this combo of film, developer, and scanner is a winner in my book, so the spotting is worth it.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Curious lizard

A little lizard statue, close up.

Image
At The Ruins

What’s left of the St. Paul Building
Aires Viscount
Ilford HP5 Plus
LegacyPro L110, Dilution B
2021

Some years ago Margaret and I visited Manhattan. We walked from our hotel on 56th St. near Central Park, out to the Hudson River and then south along the walking paths all the way to the World Trade Center and the Financial District. We lingered at St. Paul’s Chapel and its memorial to 9/11. Read about it here.

From 1898 to 1958, an early skyscraper named after the chapel stood across the street. The St. Paul Building had 26 stories and was 315 feet tall — and was regarded by many as ungainly, even ugly. Few tears were shed upon its demolition.

This is its facade. Look closely, and you can just make out ghost letters spelling ST. PAUL BUILDING over its columns. It stands in Holliday Park, a large, lovely park on the Northside of Indianapolis. It’s part of an installation called The Ruins, which recently completed a renovation.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: What’s left of the St. Paul Building

The facade of the St. Paul Building, which stood in New York until 1958 but now lives in Indianapolis.

Image