1935 Chrysler Airflow f

Airflow
Canon PowerShot S95
2011

Chrysler’s 1934-37 Airflow may have been a masterpiece of streamlining, but it bombed in the marketplace. It simply looked too strange, and buyers stayed away. But removed from the context of its time, the Airflow is clearly a groundbreaking design.

Not that you can see much of it in this photo. I found this 1935 Airflow at the 2011 Mecum auction. I moved in close to photograph this detail.

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Old Cars

Single frame: Airflow

Headlight of a 1935 Chrysler Airflow.

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1961 Chevrolet Parkwood

Parkwood
Canon PowerShot S80
2012

The other day I looked back through my many photos from the Mecum classic car auctions I used to go to. What fun those auctions were for me.

I used to take all of my digital cameras, plus all of my extra battery packs. That was one camera at first, then two, then three, all point-and-shoots. I also always brought one film camera. I was loaded down with gear!

This 1961 Chevrolet Parkwood station wagon was such a lovely color. I tended to shoot my Canon PowerShot S80 at 28mm, its default setting, which let me bring in lots of this wagon’s flank.

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Old Cars, Photography

single frame: Parkwood

1961 Chevrolet Parkwood wagon.

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Vegetables

Vegetables
Canon PowerShot S95
2020

I couldn’t find my Canon PowerShot S95 after Christmas. I took it to my mom’s for the Grey family Christmas celebration but couldn’t find it after that.

It bothered me a lot that I couldn’t find this camera! I thought perhaps I’d left it among Christmas detritus and it had gone into the bin and thus to the landfill. I was forced to think about what camera would replace it. My wife has a Sony RX100 Mark I and it’s brilliant. I supposed I’d just get one of those. But daggone it, I didn’t want to buy a new camera! I like my S95 very much. I know I make a big fuss here about film cameras and film photography. But the truth is, my favorite camera is this ten-year-old compact. It’s very good but not perfect, and many newer cameras outclass it. But I know how to get good results from it. I know this camera.

It rained all through Christmas. When I needed my dress raincoat again in late January, the S95 was in a pocket.

Delighted to have found it, I’ve been shooting it more lately. Margaret had just come from the market with these vegetables, which were on the counter. I put the camera in black-and-white mode just to see how it would render them. (If you’d like to see them in color, click here.)

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Photography

single frame: Vegetables

Vegetables, from my Canon S95.

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Red Line information

Red Line information
Olympus XA
Kodak T-Max 400
2020

Indianapolis’s bus system has never been all that great. The routes don’t serve large parts of the city, and the buses come at most every half hour.

The city is trying to change that with a new set of rapid-transit bus lines. The first, the Red Line, opened late last year. It runs north-south along a critical transportation corridor, connecting the University of Indianapolis on the Southside to Broad Ripple (and, in some cases, almost the north city limit) on the Northside. The Red Line’s electric buses reach stops every ten minutes.

I took my team at work to lunch in Broad Ripple last fall, and we rode the Red Line both ways. This is the stop Downtown at the bus terminal, where we began and ended our trip. It sure beat driving and finding a place to park.

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Film Photography

single frame: Red Line information

The Red Line bus terminal in Indianapolis.

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Chicago Skyway Bridge

Driving across the Chicago Skyway Bridge
Olympus XA
Kodak T-Max 400
2020

I barely slept the last night we were in Chicago. So I handed my car keys to Margaret. It gave me this lovely opportunity to photograph the Chicago Skyway Bridge while we were crossing it.

This bridge, built in 1958, carries the Chicago Skyway, also known as I-90, across the Calumet River. At the end of the Skyway, eastbound, is Indiana. This is a toll bridge, but thanks to my EZPass transponder I have no idea what the charge is. I just add some money to my account before we go and let the EZPass pay the toll.

It was midmorning Monday. Traffic was light. For a moment, it looked like we had this busy bridge all to ourselves.

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Film Photography

single frame: Driving across the Chicago Skyway Bridge

A through-the-windshield shot of the Chicago Skyway Bridge.

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Inside the Cadillac Palace Theatre

Inside the Palmer House Hilton
Olympus XA
Film Washi D
2020

Because I never take notes as I shoot rolls of film, once in a while I get an image back that I can’t place. I shot this whole roll of Film Washi D in Chicago, so it’s narrowed down that much. But I couldn’t remember whether I shot this inside the Cadillac Palace Theatre or the Palmer House Hilton. Peristent Googling turned up images that confirm this as the Palmer House.

Whichever it is, the Film Washi D did a nice job in the available light, delivering good tones in the marble. I like how the light falls off, giving this scene an air of mystery.

The fine folks at Analogue Wonderland gave me this roll of film in exchange for this mention. Film Washi films go in and out of stock at Analogue Wonderland; see their entire selection here.

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Film Photography

single frame: Inside the Palmer House Hilton

A peek inside Chicago’s Palmer House Hilton on Film Washi D.

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