Knight

Not-so-shining armor
Yashica TL Electro X
50mm f/1.7 Auto Yashinon-DX
Foma Fomapan 200
2021

This suit of armor stands watch over a shop in Zionsville that sells jewelry and watches purchased from estates. My wife knows the owners and they’re salt of the earth people.

Every time I look back at the photos I made with the Yashica TL Electro X and that 50/1.7 Yashinon, I’m impressed anew.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Not-so-shining armor

A suit of armor, on Fomapan 200.

Image
Ivan's Marathon

Ivan’s Marathon
Nikon N70
28-80mm f/3.5-5.6D AF Nikkor
Kodak Max 400
2021

Tomorrow I’ll share my review of the Nikon N70, a 1994 35mm SLR. It’s got a crazy user interface that most people hate.

I put two rolls of film through this camera to test it, and one of them was good old Kodak Max 400. I took it up to Thorntown with a few other cameras for an afternoon of photography. Ivan’s Marathon is a favorite subject that I’ve featured on this blog many times. I always shoot it pretty much straight on like this.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Ivan’s Marathon

An old service station, on Kodak color film.

Image
Jewel Box Jewelers

Jewel Box Jewelers
Kodak VR35 K12
Fujifilm Fujicolor 200
2021

This is my favorite image I made with the point-and-shoot Kodak VR35 K12. It was dusk, and light was dim but plentiful. But the VR35 K12 struggled with this light and returned unusably dim images — except for this one. The light from the window and from the lamps above the awning saved the day.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Jewel Box Jewelers

A dusk photo of a store window.

Image
Harry & Izzy's

Harry & Izzy’s
Zeiss Ikon Contessa LK
Ilford FP4 Plus
Ilford ID-11 1+1

2021

Despite what it says over the door, Harry & Izzy’s is a steakhouse. This building only used to be a jeweler’s. Actually, only the facade still stands here — a new building was built behind it. Harry & Izzy’s is part of the sprawling Downtown Indianapolis mall, Circle Centre.

Margaret and I had a Downtown night out not long ago. We saw a play and had dinner. Service wasn’t great so we didn’t linger for an after-dinner drink. The bar at Harry & Izzy’s had exactly two seats open, so that’s where we went.

Clearly, Margaret and I have relaxed our COVID restrictions. We are placing faith in our vaccines. When I’m eligible for a booster, I’ll get it straightaway.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

COVID-19, Film Photography

single frame: Harry & Izzy’s

Facade of an Indianapolis steakhouse.

Image
Broken windows

Brick wall, broken windows
Kodak VR35 K12
Ultrafine Extreme 400
Ilford ID-11 stock
2021

The Kodak VR35 K12 (review forthcoming) is a point-and-shoot camera meant for people to use to photograph their families and their vacations, that sort of thing. I used it to photograph the kinds of things I typically do, which is neither families nor vacations.

The viewfinder is inaccurate, off center to the lens, showing more than what the lens actually sees. That makes it challenging to compose a shot and have any idea whether the frame contains what you want. Fortunately, if your scan is large enough you can crop it liberally.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Brick wall, broken windows

Broken windows in a Lebanon, IN, alleyway.

Image
Reflecting in the retention pond

Reflecting in the retention pond
Pentax H3
55mm f/1.8 SMC Takumar
Agfa Vista 200
2018

My new book, Vinyl Village, shows the good, the bad, and the ugly about my neighborhood, which is typical of American suburbia. When I conceived it, I’m a little ashamed to admit that I had a hit piece in mind. But the more I walked this neighborhood looking deeply at it, the more I realized that the developers and builders merely designed to an aesthetic, with certain tradeoffs, while working within some heavy constraints (such a the high-voltage power lines that cut through).

Indeed, some aspects of this neighborhood are quite lovely. They made the most of the retention ponds. Here’s one.

If you’d like a copy of Vinyl Village, it’s just $9.99. Check it out here.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Reflecting in the retention pond

Homes reflecting in a retention pond, on Agfa Vista 200.

Image