Green River

Green River
Canon PowerShot S95
2017

Green River is a very sweet lime soda. It’s like liquid, carbonated lime Jell-O. It turns your tongue green.

When I was a boy I lived near a five and dime with a gleaming stainless steel soda fountain. I would ride over there on hot summer afternoons to enjoy the air conditioning, shop for stuff I didn’t really need, and enjoy a treat at the soda fountain.

They made their sodas by squirting the syrup into the bottom of a glass and filling it the rest of the way with carbonated water. Real old school. My brother always ordered a root beer, double strength. I did that sometimes, and whenever I could afford it I’d order a chocolate malt. But most of the time I’d sit down to a Green River. It was the only place in South Bend I knew I could get one. Even then it was a brand from days gone by. It’s cool that it’s managed to survive.

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Photography

single frame: Green River

Single frame: Green River

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Speeding

Speeding
iPhone 6s
2017

One of the cool features of my Toyota Matrix is how its gauges are invisible until you turn the car on. I think the display looks especially cool at night.

Astute readers may be curious as to why my car’s redline is so high, 7,800 RPM. It’s a feature of Toyota’s 2ZZ-GE four-cylinder engine, which was designed by Yamaha and built in Japan. It’s the go-fast engine in Toyota’s ZZ engine family. You’ll find versions of this engine in several Toyotas and, surprisingly, one Pontiac and two Lotuses.

Revving the engine past 6,200 RPM activates a second camshaft profile that boosts speed suddenly and considerably. It feels like turbo and is great fun. Unfortunately, my Matrix is hobbled with an automatic transmission, making it hard to reach the revs necessary to have this fun. If you ever buy a 2ZZ-GE-equipped Matrix (it will have the XRS badge on the hatch), go for the six-speed manual transmission.

I’m still talking about this car in the present tense because I haven’t disposed of it yet. It still has the front-end problems that aren’t worth fixing given the car’s market value. It’s days remain numbered. But with everything else going on I haven’t found time to deal with getting rid of it yet.

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Photography

single frame: Speeding

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Looking up

Looking up
Canon PowerShot S95
2011

I still make time most mornings for coffee, breakfast, and blogging. But I haven’t had much to say. And now I’m running out of new photographs to share. I’m just overbusy with non-blog-related things.

So here’s a photo from 2011, when I was still getting to know my Canon PowerShot S95. This is an apartment building Downtown, not far from popular Massachusetts Avenue.

 

Photography

single frame: Looking up

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Bike Xing

Bike xing
Canon PowerShot S95
2011

My Canon PowerShot S95 was a gift at Christmas in 2010. I can’t believe it just keeps working. Aren’t digital cameras supposed to be fragile, and fail after just a few years of use?

I’ve certainly used mine heavily. I’ve probably made 10,000 photographs with it.

I was still learning this camera’s ropes when a few co-workers and I took a photo walk Downtown. The city had just installed these bike-path markers in the pavement.

 

Photography

single frame: Bike xing

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Piloting the Buick

At the wheel of the old Buick
Pentax Spotmatic F, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Takumar
Kodak Plus-X
2017

I’ve never been very good at moving fast. I’m more the slow, thoughtful type. But there are moments in my photography when a wonderful scene emerges before my eyes and I have to move fast before it disappears. Such was this moment.

I forget what my camera’s settings were. I probably didn’t even know as I framed and focused. I probably just twisted the aperture ring until the viewfinder’s exposure needle registered good exposure, pressed the shutter button, and trusted that on such a bright day I’d have settings that would give me enough depth of field.

I was right. And I moved fast enough to catch the girl’s delighted smile.

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Film Photography, Old cars

single frame: At the wheel of the old Buick

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Carmel Artomobilia 2017

Camaro SS
Pentax ME, 50mm f/2 SMC Pentax-M
Fujifilm Superia 100
2017

I’m kind of over Chevy Camaros. They’re one of the most common cars at shows, and most of them have been up-restored, if you will, from lower-trim models into fire-breathing high-performance models.

I’d love, just once, to see a plain-Jane six-cylinder early Camaro at a show. Vinyl seats and two-speed Powerglide automatic transmission. The kind we used to call “secretary specials” when that wasn’t considered un-PC.

But the big red stripes on this one were photogenic, so I shot it anyway.

Photography

single frame: Camaro SS

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