N. K. Hurst Co.

N. K. Hurst Co.
Reto Ultra Wide and Slim
Fujicolor 200
2022

On the southeast edge of Downtown Indianapolis, in the shadow of Lucas Oil Stadium, stands the original home office of N. K. Hurst Company. You might know Hurst best for their 15-bean HamBeens soup kit. If it’s not available in your local grocery store, you can buy it and all of their other products at their Shopify site.

Hurst’s home office actually isn’t in this building anymore. They moved it to an industrial park on the east side of Zionsville, a suburb northwest of Indianapolis where I live. I drive by it on the way to Aldi, which does not carry HamBeens products.

I remember there being quite a kerfluffle when the land was purchased to build Lucas Oil Stadium. The N. K. Hurst Co. was on the south edge of the overall site. The authority that built the stadium wanted the land to complete a huge parking lot, but N. K. Hurst Co. did not want to give way. I’m sure billable legal hours ensued, but an agreement was reached that saved the building. After all that, a few years later N. K. Hurst. Co. moved its headquarters to Zionsville. The building is now used as an event space called The Heirloom, despite still bearing its N. K. Hurst Co. branding.

I made this photo with the tiny Reto Ultra Wide and Slim. The building’s corner has a slightly upturned look in real life, but something about the camera’s lens or how the film happened to be laying strongly exaggerated the effect.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Photographs, Preservation

single frame: N. K. Hurst Co.

The original HQ of a bean warehouse.

Image
1949 Buick Super

1949 Buick Super
Pentax ME SE
35-70mm f/4 SMC Pentax-A
Fujifilm Fujicolor 200
2022

I normally save all of the old parked cars that I find for my annual Carspotting roundup in December. (See all of my Carspotting posts here.) But I was excited enough to find this one that I’m making an exception. I’m just partial to 1940s Buicks!

There were three different generations of Buick in the 1940s. The first generation lasted two short years: 1940 and 1941. The next started in 1942, skipped 1943-45 because of the war, resumed in 1946, and wrapped in 1948. This car is of the generation that began in 1949, but ushered in the 1950s, concluding in 1953.

This is clearly an unrestored original. Just look at how the paint has faded and worn with time! I wonder what the insignia on the door used to be.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Old Cars, Photographs

single frame: 1949 Buick Super

An old car, parked.

Image
Chrome teeth

Chrome teeth
Olympus XA
Arista Premium 400
2013

I’m dipping deep into the archive for this photo. I made it at the 2013 Mecum classic-car auction in Indianapolis. This is part of the grille on a 1966 or 1967 Dodge Charger.

I haven’t been to a car show in a good long time and I’m itching to go to at least one this year. I really love photographing old cars!

I made this with my tiny Olympus XA, a camera I haven’t used since December of 2020. It’s overdue for some exercise! Just look at the sharpness and detail that lens is capable of delivering.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Old Cars, Photographs

single frame: Chrome teeth

A muscle car’s grille.

Image
Wrigley building

Between the Wrigley Building towers
Minolta Maxxum 5
35-70mm f/4 Maxxum AF Zoom
Fujifilm Fujicolor 200
2022

I’m fascinated with the Wrigley Building in Chicago. You’ll find it on Michigan Avenue, on the west side of the street, just north of the Chicago River. The building has two towers connected by an arched pedestrian walkway. This creates a courtyard of sorts, one of concrete rather than of grass, between the towers. I find this to be a stunning view and I love to photograph it.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Photographs

single frame: Between the Wrigley Building towers

Between the towers of Chicago’s Wrigley Building.

Image
Sophie

Sophie in the window
Kodak EasyShare Z730
2007

I was looking back through old photographs and found this one of Sophie, who was my cat for a short time after I was divorced. Read Sophie’s whole story here. This blog was just six months old when I made this photograph. I was still reeling from my divorce. I deliberately avoided writing about it here — I wanted to use this blog as a way to move on and look forward. So I seldom told stories about my life as it was happening then.

I routinely left windows open for Sophie when I went to work so she could enjoy the breezes and the outside smells. She loved this window in particular because she could stretch out in it. But I guess fleas jumped in and onto her through the screens, and soon I had the worst flea infestation I’d ever seen. They got into the carpets; as I walked through the house I could see and feel them jumping up and bouncing off my legs. I had to spray flea killer through the entire house three times, each time sequestering poor Sophie to a crate in the garage all day. I never opened a window again, and never saw another flea.

Sophie needed more time and attention than I could give her. Long story short, I gave Sophie to my ex-wife and she gave me the dogs we’d had while we were married. Each of us still maintains we got the better end of the deal. The dogs were a Rottweiler named Sugar and a Golden Retriever-Chow mix named Gracie. Read Sugar’s story here, and Gracie’s here. Since Gracie died in 2013, I’ve remained petless.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Photographs, Stories Told

single frame: Sophie in the window

Reminiscing about Sophie, a cat I used to own

Image
Bourbon Bottle Light

Bourbon bottle light
Nikon Df, 28-80mm f/3.3-5.6G AF Nikkor
2021

This photograph was a runner up for my 10 Favorite Photos post this year. I like the muted colors and the quality of the blurred background.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Photographs

single frame: Bourbon bottle light

A bourbon bottle as a light. I just like this photograph is all.

Image