Nestled amid the rolling hills of central Kentucky, 25 miles southwest of Lexington, you’ll find a village built and occupied by members of the Shaker religious sect from 1805 to 1910. Many of the buildings they built still stand, most of them in restored condition. It’s a remarkable collection of structures, suggesting a large and vibrant community. Here are many of the doors from Shaker Village. It’s a tourist destination today; where you see Open signs on the doors, it means visitors are invited in to wander and explore.

Doors
Door
Doors
Door
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
View
Door
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Door
The Trustee's House

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Preservation

Thursday doors: Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill

On this Thursday, the doors of Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, Kentucky.

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Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill

Early evening at Shaker Village
Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SMC Pentax-DA AL
2019

Margaret and I get away four times a year for a long weekend, usually in March, June, September, and December. Margaret started a new job recently and its demands will sadly keep us from our usual December visit to Chicago. To compensate we made two trips this summer, one to her hometown of St. Charles, Illinois, a few weeks ago, and one to Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill in Kentucky over Labor Day weekend.

I’ll share more from Shaker Hill in posts to come, but in short the Shaker religious sect arrived here in 1805 and built quite a village of stone, brick, and wood frame buildings. They were innovative, building a system of running water throughout the village; the yellow buildings on the right were part of that system. They also lived communally; the stone building was one of three major houses the people lived in.

Today it’s a tourist destination with lodging on site. We stayed in a room in what had once been the East Family Wash House. The houses were named for their relative geographic location in the village, the people who lived in each house were called a family, and each family had a building in which they did their laundry. Innovatively, their laundry facility was horse powered, reducing the human manual labor of washing all those clothes and linens!

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Photography

single frame: Early evening at Shaker Village

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Courthouse

The Birch Bayh Federal Building and United States Courthouse
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Film Washi S
2019

I’m at best a beginning student in photography appreciation, with limited ability to describe the qualities of a good photograph. For that matter, I’m not even sure I can judge a photograph to be good, not on some universal scale. I just like what I like.

I like this photograph. The 35mm lens brings in tons of interesting context surrounding this neoclassical federal courthouse. The glowing sunlight cast against the building’s facade contrasts pleasingly against its shadowy flank.

It’s said that Film Washi S performs best in diffuse light. For a day of black-and-white photography in full sun, I should have been better served shooting something like T-Max 100 or FP4 Plus. But I would have missed out on the chiaroscuro effect, though unintended, obtained in shooting this film in non-ideal light.

Analogue Wonderland provided me this roll of Film Washi S in exchange for this mention. Buy yours from them here.

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Film Photography

single frame: The Birch Bayh Federal Building and United States Courthouse

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Doorway

Doorway
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Film Washi S
2019

I bungled my roll of Film Washi S by shooting it in bright sun. I didn’t know it at the time, but it does best in dull, diffuse light.

This photo of a doorway in Downtown Indianapolis turned out all right somehow. Perhaps it’s because I was on a side street and tall buildings blocked much of the direct sun.

The film (and lens, of course) captured good detail and sharpness. There’s a compelling silveriness to this image.

Analogue Wonderland provided me this roll of Film Washi S in exchange for this mention. Buy yours from them here.

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Film Photography

single frame: Doorway

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Courthouse and Regions Tower

United States Court House and Post Office
Olympus XA2
Ultrafine Xtreme 100
2019

I sometimes wonder if anyone notices me photographing this building. I’ve done it a lot lately. It is, after all, a federal courthouse — the threat of terrorism has all federal buildings on alert. I’m sure security officers are always watching.

But I’m a middle-aged man in business casual dress carrying an old film camera. I hope that signals I’m a threat to nobody.

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Film Photography

single frame: United States Court House and Post Office

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While Margaret and I stood on the bridge overlooking the Fox River in St. Charles, this man and boy waded out into the river and started fishing.

Fishin'

I zoomed my lens in as far as it would go, but the pair were still mighty small. So I put them more-or-less on rule-of-thirds lines and bathed them in context.

Fishin'

In my 52 years I’ve never watched anyone wade out into the middle of a river in a city’s downtown to fish.

Fishin'

As you can see, it’s easy enough to do in St. Charles: just ease down the stairs from the Municipal Center with your gear and step in.

Fishin'

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Photography

Fishin’

Just a man and boy fishing, in the middle of a river, in a city’s downtown. How improbable!

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