Route 66 Marker

You’ll find this “Route 66 Historic Route Begins” sign on Adams St. at Wabash Ave. in Chicago — one block away from where the route actually begins, at Michigan Ave.

A smaller, standard brown Historic Route sign marking Route 66’s actual beginning is bolted to a pole right at Adams and Michigan. I thought I had a photograph of it, but alas. This page has several. The official End Route 66 sign is one block away, on Jackson Blvd., as Adams is one way west and Jackson is one way east.

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Road Trips

Sort of the beginning of Route 66

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Window in our room at Hotel Allegro

Morning light, hotel window
Nikon F3, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor
Kodak T-Max P3200
2018

Just one more shot from the F3 on that remarkable T-Max P3200. It did a wonderful job rendering both the light and dark areas of this scene. As I shot this, through my viewfinder I could clearly see a television on top of the cabinet at right. The P3200 does have its limits.

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Film Photography

single frame: Morning light, hotel window

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View from a 15th-floor hotel window

View from the hotel window
Nikon F3, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor
Kodak T-Max P3200
2018

I just love how much definition the T-Max P3200 delivered at night through our Chicago hotel window. Just look at the cars in the glowing parking garage! They’re so clear you can almost tell what make and model some of them are.

If you’re looking at this on a computer monitor rather than on your phone or tablet, you can see how even at this larger size the considerable grain doesn’t detract at all from the image.

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Film Photography

single frame: View from the hotel window

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Cathedral

Turbaned man passing a Catholic church by
Canon PowerShot S95
2018

Have you ever made a photograph and then, later, you noticed something in it that made the image? This is one of those times for me.

Margaret and I happened upon St. Peter’s Church, on W. Madison St. in the Loop in Chicago. It’s such a stunning structure that we had to pause for photographs. Madison St. is relatively narrow, and I couldn’t back up enough to capture the whole building. So I looked for interesting framing within what I could capture.

The building’s symmetry appealed to me — my goodness, but do I love symmetry — so I went for that. Then today, while reviewing these images, I noticed the man in the turban passing by. What a joyful juxtaposition!

Photography

single frame: Turbaned man passing a Catholic church by

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I made thousands of photos in 2018. I like these ten best.

Debra

Debra. Pentax ME, 50mm f/1.4 SMC Pentax-M, Fujifilm Superia X-tra 800.

1996

1996. Minolta XG 1, 50mm f/1.4 MD Rokkor-X, Ultrafine Xtreme 100.

Cad fin

Cad fin. Canon AE-1 Program, 50mm f/1.8 Canon FD, Agfa Vista 200 (at EI 100)

On St. Clair St.

On St. Clair St. Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A, Agfa APX 100 (x-7/98)

Wheeler Mision

Wheeler Mission. Kodak Brownie Starmatic, Kodak Ektar 100

Lafayette alley

Lafayette alley. Kodak VR35 K40, Kodak Max 400 (expired)

On the beach in Ocean City, MD

On the beach in Ocean City, MD. Canon PowerShot S95.

Under the Clock

Under the clock. Pentax KM, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax, Kodak T-Max 400.

Ballroom

Ballroom. Pentax KM, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax, Kodak T-Max 400.

One Nine Five *EXPLORED*

One Nine Five. Yashica Electro 35 GSN. Kodak Tri-X 400.

Photography

Ten favorite photos of 2018

Here are the ten photos I made in 2018 that I like most.

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Double exposure of my brother, 1985
Argus A-Four
Kodacolor VR 200 (probably)
1985

My brother ran for the high-school track team. The practice track was behind the school, along a side street. Mom and Dad used to drive over there and watch practice.

It was my senior year. I have negatives from a roll of film I shot that May as I was preparing to graduate. This photograph tells me I was using my Argus A-Four camera. That’s because it’s the only 35mm camera I owned then that allowed me to take a double exposure.

I didn’t mean to take this one. I took one shot of my brother leaning against the fence, and then a minute later took another — but forgot to wind in between. Also, I turned the camera both times for a landscape photo, but the second time upside down from the first time.

It made this double image of my brother, made perfectly symmetrical with a judicious crop.

Film Photography

single frame: Double exposure of my brother, 1985

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