A hike through Eagle Creek Park

Hiking through Eagle Creek Park with my wife
Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SMC Pentax-DA AL
2018

When you are single for as long as Margaret and I were, you get used to living your own life. She was a full-time single mom, her time given to taking care of her four children and working to support everyone. I was a single dad who saw his kids two nights a week and every other weekend and filled the rest of his life with career, a non-profit, and church.

When we met, our lives were already full. Overfull, really. It was going to be a joy and a challenge to weave our lives together. We were going to have to approach it thoughtfully and deliberately.

Unfortunately, we didn’t do that. Serious challenges came at us so fast and so frequently that we went into survival mode. We’d both survived difficult times before, as single people. That’s how we knew to do it.

By this summer we found ourselves living our lives in parallel because it was most efficient to do it that way. We didn’t see for a long time that it was hurting us.

Thankfully, we saw it before it hurt us too much. We’ve made some strong changes that have us jointly planning our time, saying no to too much time apart, and making much more time to do simple things together. Like walk through Eagle Creek Park.

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Photography

single frame: Hiking through Eagle Creek Park with my wife

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Yellow flowers

Yellow flowers
Minolta XG 1, 50mm f/1.7 Minolta MD
Agfa Vista 200 (at EI 100)
2018

When I was 22 I broke up with a young woman who I still call my first great love. We were such comfortable companions. Our favorite thing was to watch bad movies together on cable well into the wee hours. She was brilliant at heckling them. Her dry, nerdy humor kept me laughing. I don’t laugh easily. She was a real gift in my life.

Yet we couldn’t make other things about our relationship work, important things. I don’t think she ever felt like I really loved her. I showed her in the ways I knew how, but she needed to feel loved in ways I didn’t understand and couldn’t give.  And when I was tired or overwhelmed or irritated I was prickly and difficult. Still am. She never knew how to deal with that and she took it hard.

Sometimes a relationship can’t last because you’re not right together in some ways that really matter. Yet you’re reluctant to end it because it’s otherwise so comfortable. But after awhile comfort isn’t enough, and after a longer while the places where you don’t fit start to grate. More of your needs must be met. We ended our relationship, and it hurt, and we missed each other. But it was necessary.

My many Minolta SLRs have all been lovely and felt great in my hands. Their lenses are sublime. My heart leaps over the images these cameras give me. I want to shoot with them forever.

But they have been so unreliable. I just can’t keep one working for the long haul. There may be photographers out there who enjoy taking their gear apart and keeping them working smoothly. I’m not one of them. I just want my gear to work, period. And that’s why I’ve just sold my last Minolta body and am running right into the arms of reliable Pentax and Nikon.

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Film Photography, Stories Told

single frame: Yellow flowers

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The Huddleston Farmhouse

Tea service in the 1800s
Pentax K10D, 55mm f/3.5-5.6 SMC Pentax-DA AL
2018

Inside the Huddleston Farmhouse everything is set up as if a family still lived there. This tea service was on a table in the parlor, as if guests are expected.

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Photography, Road Trips

single frame: Tea service in the 1800s

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The Huddleston Farmhouse

To the Trustees of the Norfolk Agricultural Society
Pentax K10D, 55mm f/3.5-5.6 SMC Pentax-DA AL
2018

There isn’t much to say about this photo except that this scene exists inside the Huddleston Farmhouse and it begs to be photographed.

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Photography, Road Trips

single frame: To the Trustees of the Norfolk Agricultural Society

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The Huddleston Farmhouse

Overlooking the historic National Road
Pentax K10D, 55mm f/3.5-5.6 SMC Pentax-DA AL
2018

All this week we’ll tour the Huddleston Farmhouse property on the National Road just west of Cambridge City, Indiana. John Huddleston built it in 1841 for his wife Sarah and their eleven children. Not only did they live in this house and work the surrounding farm, but they opened first-floor rooms to travelers. The Huddleston Farmhouse was an early inn.

Tomorrow we’ll look at the buildings on the property. Thursday we’ll tour the first floor, which is decorated much as one would have found it in the 1840s. Wednesday and Friday I’ll share photos of some of the more charming details inside.

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Photography

single frame: Overlooking the historic National Road

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Centerville, Indiana, is known for its arches. You’ll see them when you visit: passageways in many of the buildings to courtyards behind them. It’s a distinctive architectural feature of this small National Road town, which was founded in 1814.

Centerville is also known for its antique shops. It’s one of the towns on Indiana’s famous Antique Alley. Centerville and nearby Cambridge City are probably the most prominent towns on that tour.

But Centerville is not known for its doors. That’s a shame, because they are lovely. Here are many of the doors you’ll find in Centerville right on the National Road, better known today as US 40.

Centerville door

Centerville door

Centerville door

Centerville door

Centerville door

Centerville door

Centerville door

Centerville door

Centerville door

Centerville door

Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SMC Pentax-DA AL

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Photography, Preservation, Road Trips

Thursday doors: Centerville, Indiana on the National Road

In this installment of Thursday Doors, we check out those on the National Road in Centerville, IN. This town was laid out in 1814 — about as old as it gets in Indiana!

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