Collecting Cameras

Just a reminder that I have some film-photo gear for sale on my For Sale page.

Minolta SR-T-101

I’m winding down Operation Thin the Herd, where I’m evaluating each camera in my collection and deciding which stay or go. My aim is to shrink my collection to cameras I’ll use regularly. 

I’m offering some great gear at reasonable prices. Check out my For Sale page to see what’s on offer.

Shipping is free anywhere in North America on all items! I’m happy to ship outside North America for actual shipping cost.

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Gear for sale

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Blogosphere

A couple weeks ago I published a mini-review of the new Gutenberg editor in WordPress. I said there that there was no clean way to embed images from Flickr.

I was wrong. It’s stupefyingly easy. You just paste the Flickr embed code directly into an empty block. The image appears instantly! It also hyperlinks back to the Flickr page from which it came, per Flickr’s terms of service.

Teacup
Flickr image embedded instantly into WordPress Gutenberg

This is far easier than how we all had to embed Flickr images in any previous WordPress editor. Given that I use Flickr to host my photographs, Gutenberg is making creating posts significantly faster for me!

Embedding Flickr images in the WordPress Gutenberg editor

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Film Photography

The first review of my new book, Textures of Ireland, is in, and it’s positive!

Fellow photoblogger Mike Connealy says in his review, “One thing I have particularly enjoyed about both of Jim’s books is the fact that they closely resemble the style and content of his photography blog, Down the Road. The difference, of course, being that one can enjoy the high quality images on paper without the size limitations and unpredictable variability of any online presentation. Whether displayed on paper or on a screen, however, Jim’s stories are always first rate, reflecting his dedication to achieving ever more mastery of image making and narration.”

You can read the full review here.

If you haven’t picked up your copy yet you can do it here. $14.99 + shipping for the paper book, $4.99 for the PDF!

Review of Textures of Ireland

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Photography

If you tried to buy my new book, Textures of Ireland, this morning and got an error message, I’ve fixed the problem. It was totally my fault. I’m sorry for the frustration!

TexturesOfIrelandIcon Textures of Ireland Book

A copy of my book, Textures of Ireland, printed on demand and mailed to you from Blurb.com.

$14.99 plus shipping

Buy-Now-button

If you’d rather buy my book in PDF form, click the PayPal button below. I’ll email you a download link !

Textures of Ireland PDF

A copy of my book, Textures of Ireland, as a PDF — which I will email within 24 hours to the address you provide.

$4.99

 

I fixed the order link

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Photography, Road Trips

My stats tell the story: you like my photography posts best, by far. So why, then, do I keep writing about old roads and the places on them?

Abandoned National Road

First, because I love them. Why do you think this blog is called Down the Road? I intended to make this blog be primarily about the old roads. But then I rekindled my love of old film cameras and caught the photography bug. The blog’s purpose shifted toward photography over time, and that’s how I attracted the bulk of my readership.

But second, these posts become public services, of sorts. Google search brings readers to them all the time. Every now and then someone will share one on Facebook and I’ll get a flood of views. There are plenty of people who live on or near one of the old alignments I write about, and finding my research really delights them, or tells them a story they never knew about a place familiar to them. A few of them even leave a comment saying so. In this way I feel like I’m leaving a small gift to the world.

Why do I write about old roads on a photography blog?

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Film Photography

I bought hand-cut and -rolled 127 film from eBay user jrdnmrk for my Kodak Baby Brownie (and for my Kodak Brownie Starmatic, pictures from which I’ll share in an upcoming post).

It was a pretty good experience. The film came rolled with proper tightness. The green tape seal was easy enough to remove. The backing paper came from either this or some other roll of film, and had 127 numbering hand-marked on it. The photos below illustrate; click to see any of them larger. The last two show the film numbering inside the Baby Brownie (eight photos) and the Brownie Starmatic (twelve photos), respectively.

 

At the end of each roll I found a Kodak sealing band, but too far up the backing paper. So I just removed it and affixed it where I wanted it to go. Dwayne’s processed each roll with no trouble.

Using hand-cut 127 film

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