Magnolias at the Smithsonian Castle

Among the Smithsonian’s magnolias
Canon PowerShot S95
2018

We approached the National Mall from behind the Smithsonian Castle, only to be surprised by the garden we found there. It’s a rooftop garden of sorts, inasmuch as there is a structure underground beneath it. Yet magnolia trees line it on either side, and they were in bloom this bright early-April day.

Photography, Travel

single frame: Among the Smithsonian’s magnolias

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Road Trips, Stories Told

I hate what domestic terrorism has done to our country

The first time I visited Washington, DC, was in 1993. It was an unexpected visit: I was in Maryland on business, and a schedule change left me with a free day. I was in a town at the end of the Metro train line, so I bought a pass and rode right into the National Mall.

I had no idea what to expect. I was surprised and delighted to find Capitol at one end, the Washington Monument in the middle, and the Lincoln Memorial at the other end, all separated by grass and pools.

US Capitol, 1993

Before I left Maryland I stepped into a drug store and bought a disposable camera. I’m so happy I did, because with it I recorded scenes that aren’t there anymore. Like this one.

US Capitol, 1993

Of course these steps are still there. What’s not there is the ability to walk up them. They are barricaded and a guard is posted. It’s been that way since sometime after that terrible day in September of 2001. But in 1993 I walked right up them. When I reached the top, I stood on the terrace and made this photograph.

US Capitol, 1993

You can’t make that photograph anymore because you can’t reach that terrace.

Here’s something else you can’t do anymore: on impulse, waltz right into the United States Capitol. I did just that on this August, 1993 day. I followed the yellow rope line up the steps (humming to myself, “I’m just a bill, yes I’m only a bill…“) and walked in the door. Much of the Capitol was open to anyone. Only the House and Senate chambers were closed to the public.

US Capitol, 1993

It was thrilling to simply walk into and experience this hall of American government. But it was as I had always been taught: this government and, by extension, its buildings belonged to the people. We were therefore free to experience public spaces within them whenever we wanted.

You can’t enter the Capitol this way anymore. For that matter, you can’t enter the Capitol at all without having prearranged it (which you do online here). And you don’t walk up those steps. Instead, you enter through a bunker-like underground visitor’s center (completed in 2008) that’s about 150 feet behind where I stood to make the photo above. On the way in you have to empty your pockets into trays and walk through a metal detector.

We all know that drill. We’ve experienced it for many, many years now. We all probably expect it on some level. You don’t want someone walking in armed and shooting Senators.

In 1993 that idea was so far-fetched as to be ridiculous. Today we can all fully imagine it happening. It’s a national tragedy.

But screening us all creates a second, and in my opinion greater, tragedy. Formerly our government belonged to us. Now our government can’t trust us. Formerly each of us was presumed harmless. Now as any of us enters a government building there is that one moment where the guard at the metal detector just can’t be sure.

It changes how we view our government. We used to believe we were all in it together, that our government, while not perfect, was of us and for us. Now the government feels separate from us, and we don’t feel welcome in it.

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In the Metro

U Street Metro station
Canon PowerShot S95
2018

There is some disagreement over whether the Metro stations in Washington, DC, are Brutalist in design. But it’s hard to disagree that they are distinctive.

On our recent vacation in DC, we stayed in Maryland (because hotels in DC are stupid expensive) and rode the Metro everywhere. It worked out great. The trains were clean (though well worn) and on time.

Photography, Travel

single frame: U Street Metro station

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Travel

Checking out the cherry blossoms

Our Spring Break vacation took us to Washington, DC, and the Atlantic Ocean. During our DC days the cherry trees were in bloom, and looked to be at peak. Our first day in the city was overcast, but that seemed not to blunt the blooms’ color.

I have many more photos from our trip to share, but first I have several posts to write about an afternoon I spent with my older son and our film cameras. But since this is the right time for cherry blossoms, here they are as a preview of sorts of the Spring Break posts to come.

DC Cherry Blossoms
DC Cherry Blossoms
DC Cherry Blossoms
DC Cherry Blossoms

Canon PowerShot S95

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Reflecting pool

Reflecting pool, Washington, DC
Kodak EasyShare Z730
2009

Photography
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Photography, Travel

Captured: Inside the U.S. Capitol

Inside the U.S. Capitol

My little Kodak EasyShare Z730 is a respectable point-and-shoot digital camera. Even though I moved on to Canon PowerShot digicams several years ago, at first shooting an S80 donated by reader Lone Primate, and now a sublime S95, I still get out my Z730 from time to time. It’s a wonderful companion on a nature walk, as it captures color better than either of my Canons.

This photo is from my family’s Washington, D.C., trip in 2009. We toured the U.S. Capitol and I took this photo inside. The Z730 did all right in the available light, and did a really nice job of capturing color and detail. Unfortunately, everything inside that dome was blown out. So I just brought the image into Photoshop to blunt the effect.

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