The Lockerbie Square neighborhood in Downtown Indianapolis was platted between 1847 and 1850, making it one of the city’s oldest surviving neighborhoods. Its streets are lined with older homes, some which date to near the neighborhood’s founding. You’ll also find the only surviving cobblestone street in Indianapolis there.

Margaret and I went there on a photo walk one Saturday afternoon not long ago. I had a film camera along and gave it plenty of exercise, but I photographed the doors of Lockerbie Square with my iPhone 12 mini.

Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square
Doors of Lockerbie Square

Here’s that cobblestone street. It lasts just one block. On this street is the home James Whitcomb Riley lived in for the last two decades of his life. Riley was a beloved writer and poet, most famous for his verses in the Indiana vernacular of the day. Riley commanded enormous crowds wherever he would speak in the Hoosier State.

Lockerbie Street
Lockerbie Street

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Photographs, Preservation

Thursday doors: Lockerbie Square, Indianapolis

The doors of Lockerbie Square, one of Indianapolis’s oldest neighborhoods.

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Hjelmerstald, which means horse stable, is a street in the city center of Aalborg, a northern Denmark city. Dating to the mid 17th century, this old cobblestone street and its buildings have been well preserved.

On Hjelmerstald

When this street was new, it was on the southern outskirts of Aalborg. Today, it’s well within the city center, near the shopping district and any number of little cafes.

But being a Thursday doors post, let me get right to the doors. I captured an even dozen of them, all in portrait orientation, so be prepared to scroll!

On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald

This short L-shaped street is best viewed long, however. It is charming.

On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald

I’ve found little about Hjelmerstald’s history but I’ll recount what I’ve read. Initially, stable buildings lined this street, hence its name. By the late 1600s, homes began to appear here. By the 1800s, Hjelmerstald was home to regiments of soldiers as well as the poor of Aalborg. By the early 1900s, this was a bad neighborhood, one you didn’t want to visit unless you had to. But since then it’s been turned around and today is as lovely as you see it here.

This post is part of the Thursday Doors community.

Nikon Df, 28-200mm f/3.3-5.6 AF-G Nikkor

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Travel

Thursday doors: Hjelmerstald

The beautiful doors of a historic street in Aalborg, Denmark.

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Margaret and I spent last weekend in and around Lexington, Kentucky. It was our first getaway as a couple since our trip to Bardstown last October, and hoo boy, did we need this. Even though both of us have had our first COVID-19 vaccination shots, we still took steps to keep ourselves and others safe from the virus: we rented an Airbnb to avoid hotel lobbies and so we could make our own breakfast, and we took the rest of our meals at restaurants but outside. We did a few distillery tours, wearing masks. But mostly, we walked around Lexington with our cameras.

The Gratz Park neighborhood is just northeast of downtown, with Transylvania University on its northeast edge. It’s a small neighborhood of ten city blocks and a park. Established in 1781, many of the homes and other buildings here were built in the first half of the 1800s.

Here now, the doors.

Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY

Here are a couple photos that take a wider view, so you can get a feel for the neighborhood.

Gratz Park, Lexington, KY
Gratz Park, Lexington, KY

Nikon Df, 28-80mm f/3.3-4.5G AF Nikkor

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Photography

Thursday doors: Gratz Park, Lexington, Kentucky

The early-1800s doors of Gratz Park, Lexington.

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Old Louisville is a neighborhood in, as you might guess, Louisville. You’ll find it just south of downtown. It’s full of late-1800s homes mostly in the Late Victorian style, with a few Italianate, Federal, Second Empire, and Richardson Romanesque homes in there for good measure.

Belgravia Court, Old Louisville

The centerpiece of Old Louisville is St. James Court, a wide boulevard with a grassy median and a copper fountain. The centerpiece of this centerpiece, however, is Belgravia Court. It’s at the south end of St. James Court. But you can’t drive this court — you’ll have to park your car and walk. It is two rows of houses that face each other, sidewalks and a grassy median separating them. Gas streetlights line the median.

Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville

Here now, the doors of Belgravia Court.

Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville
Belgravia Court, Old Louisville

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Photography

Thursday doors: Belgravia Court, Old Louisville

The doors of Belgravia Court, Louisville.

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Nestled amid the rolling hills of central Kentucky, 25 miles southwest of Lexington, you’ll find a village built and occupied by members of the Shaker religious sect from 1805 to 1910. Many of the buildings they built still stand, most of them in restored condition. It’s a remarkable collection of structures, suggesting a large and vibrant community. Here are many of the doors from Shaker Village. It’s a tourist destination today; where you see Open signs on the doors, it means visitors are invited in to wander and explore.

Doors
Door
Doors
Door
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
View
Door
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Door
The Trustee's House

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Preservation

Thursday doors: Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill

On this Thursday, the doors of Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, Kentucky.

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I’ve been writing about New Harmony all week — but for those of you here just for the doors, it’s a historic town in the southwestern tip of Indiana. Its founders tried, and failed, to build a utopian society here. Today it’s both a typical small Indiana town and something of an artist’s colony. It makes for a lovely long weekend, as my wife and I found out recently. And now, herewith the doors of New Harmony.

Around New Harmony
Around New Harmony
Around New Harmony
Working Men's Institute
Around New Harmony
Episcopal church
Episcopal church
Opera House
The Roofless Church
Photography

Thursday doors: New Harmony, Indiana

Some of the doors from New Harmony, for the Thursday Doors feature.

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