Road Trips

New neon at the Old Style Inn

Logansport’s Old Style Inn used to have a great neon sign over its door. I was disappointed a few years ago to discover it had been removed.

Old Style Inn, Logansport

Hard telling how old this sign was, but it was a classic to be sure.

Old Style Inn, Logansport

I was pleased on my recent Logansport trip to find that the Old Style has a new sign in the neon style. It’s probably not actually neon — so many modern neon-like signs are actually flexible LED lighting. But it’s pretty well done.

Old Style Inn, Logansport

Margaret and I stopped here for dinner before we went home. Our server explained that the Old Style had formerly been just a bar. When it remodeled and became a bar/restaurant a few years ago, the owner felt new signage was in order. Here’s hoping the original sign was saved, and isn’t sitting in a landfill somewhere.

Click here to get Down the Road in your inbox or reader six days a week!

 

Advertisements
Standard

Meijer

meijer
Olympus Trip 35
Agfa Vista 200
2018

For those of you not in the midwestern United States, Meijer is a big-box store offering groceries, health-and-beauty items, clothing, housewares, office supplies, and home electronics.

When I test cameras I like to photograph familiar subjects. One of them was an office building in which I worked, at least until I no longer worked in it anymore. Another was the shed in my back yard, at least until I moved away.

Since I moved to Zionsville, I’ve been trying to find new common subjects. One is clearly the sign at Black Dog Books in the village; I was photographing it regularly even before I moved here. But I’ve photographed this giant wall three times now, which makes me think it’s becoming a common subject for me. I like the giant, colorful letters.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

 

Film Photography

single frame: meijer

.

Image

The Wellington

The Wellington
Yashica Electro 35 GSN
Kodak Tri-X 400
2018

I was there the night The Wellington closed for good. It was just a couple weeks ago. And it was packed, just packed.

This was assuredly the smallest bar in Indianapolis’s Broad Ripple neighborhood, and perhaps in all of Indianapolis. I never measured, of course, but I bet it was no larger than my home’s kitchen and family room, combined.

A group of co-workers from three companies ago have met there the first Wednesday of the month for something like ten years. I’ve always been invited, but I usually had my sons on those Wednesdays and couldn’t go. Now that the parenting-time years are over I was starting to make it most Welly Wednesdays. And now it’s closed.

The gang will find some other Broad Ripple bar. But it won’t be the same.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

 

Film Photography

single frame: The Wellington

.

Image
Preservation, Road Trips

Endangered: Wrecks, Inc., sign

The central Indiana town of Whitestown calls itself the fastest-growing town in the state. As it continues to expand, it wants to build a sprawling community campus on an unused 170-acre plot that was once the Wrecks, Inc., automobile junkyard. That wrecking yard’s unusual and humorous neon sign remains.

Wrecks

The Wrecks, Inc., property is in Boone County, on Indianapolis Road west and then south of the I-65 Whitestown/Zionsville exit. This road is the historic Lafayette Road, which was built in the 1830s to connect Indianapolis to Lafayette. It carried US 52 for much of the 20th century.

Plans for the community campus show grass and shrubbery where this sign currently stands, making it appear that the sign will not survive the construction.

WhitestownCommunityCampus

Plans are preliminary. It’s not clear whether contaminated ground water found on this site has been cleaned up sufficiently to allow construction. That contamination scuttled plans for a housing subdivision to be built here in 2007.

This sign is visible from nearby I-65, and was quite a sight when the junkyard was still in operation and the sign lit up at night. Today, many surely consider the sign to be an eyesore and will not be sorry to see it go. Here’s hoping that if it is not retained, a collector or sign museum will be allowed to dismantle and preserve it.

Like this post? Share it on social media with the buttons below! And subscribe to get more in your inbox or reader six days a week.    Click here to subscribe!
Standard

Drugs

Your future is key
Pentax K10D, 28-80mm f/3.5-4.7 SMC Pentax-FA
2017

I’ve always thought anti-drug programs that bring up drugs at all are like telling a kid not to think about elephants. That’s the surest way to fill a kid’s mind with pachyderms.

My recent road trip was a major test of my Pentax K10D and the 28-80 zoom lens I had just bought. I wasn’t always happy with this pair’s performance. I’m sure I’m still learning this gear and with a few more serious outings I’ll learn a lot about how to get good results. But I had trouble with near items being out of focus, and with a little chromatic aberration, the latter of which I believe is apparent in this image.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.
Photography

single frame: Your future is key

.

Image

Martinsville

City of Mineral Water
Pentax K10D, 28-80mm f/3.5-4.7 SMC Pentax-FA
2017

Martinsville, Indiana, was once renowned for its healing waters.

It was while drilling for oil in the area in 1887 that a smelly aquifer was found. In those days, mineral waters were thought to possess healing properties.

Martinsville’s first mineral-water spa, or sanitarium as they were called then, was established in 1888. By 1930, thirteen sanitariums operated there. People from all walks of life came from around the world to Martinsville to bathe.

But the Great Depression and the closing of the Interurban line that reached Martinsville brought about the sanitariums’ decline. The last of them closed in 1971.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

 

History, Photography

single frame: City of Mineral Water

.

Image