Film Photography

Car parts

I recently updated my 2012 review of the Pentax K1000; see it here. On my first ever roll in that camera I walked through the parking lot at work, photographing colorful everyday cars up close. I’ve always thought these photos were fun. A couple of these have been only on my hard drive all these years.

Jeep light

Over at Curbside Classic, the old-car blog to which I sometimes contribute, someone will occasionally post a parking-lot photo from 30 or 50 years ago. It’s always great fun to see the everyday cars of the era. The cars that get saved or restored tend to be the more noteworthy or upper-trim models.

Decklid

These photographs are far too close up to ever provide much of that feeling of nostalgia. But even seven years later, when was the last time you saw a Dodge Neon R/T (above)? Even the once-ubiquitous Chevy Malibu Maxx (below) is starting to be thin on the ground.

LT V6

Cars date photographs. I follow a group on Facebook for vintage photographs of Indiana. The posters are often left to guess when photos were made. Because I have good knowledge of American automobiles after World War II, I can frequently help narrow it down. “That had to be made no earlier than 1968 because there’s a 1968 Chevy in the photo.”

Sidewalk?

I made all of these photos with my 50mm f/2 SMC Pentax-M lens on Fujicolor 200.

It’s easy to make detail photos of old cars; there are so many details. I find newer cars to be more challenging. Revisiting these seven-year-old photographs makes me want to try more often now.

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K1000

Pentax K1000 fresh from CLA
Pentax ME, 50mm f/1.7 SMC Pentax-M
Kodak Gold 200 (at EI 100)
2018

Last winter I loaned my K1000 to my son with the promise that if he enjoyed using it, I’d let him keep it — but first, I’d send it to Eric Hendrickson for a complete overhaul. When he came home from college in the spring, he gave me the word: he’d had a great time with it and would enjoy keeping it.

Along the way I picked up an ME body at a good price. I love shooting my ME — its aperture-priority shooting suits me, and its smaller size makes it more pleasant to carry. I figured my son might like one, too. So I sent both cameras to Eric, who returned them to me recently, smelling factory fresh, ready to serve for at least another 20 years.

Both cameras are in my son’s hands now. A longtime reader of this blog offered me a spare 50mm f/1.7 SMC Pentax-A lens that he no longer wanted, for my son’s ME. It was a generous gift, and my son gratefully accepted it.

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Collecting Cameras

single frame: Pentax K1000 fresh from CLA

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On Illinois Street

56th and Illinois
Pentax K1000, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax
Kodak Gold 400
2017

Margaret and I keep walking Indianapolis neighborhoods, considering where we might like to settle after we’re empty nested in a few years. The neighborhood around 56th and Illinois appeals deeply to me.

Photography

Photo: Street scene, 56th and Illinois, Indianapolis

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On Illinois Street

Planter box on Illinois Street
Pentax K1000, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax
Kodak Gold 400
2017

I think every film has its use. I just hadn’t found the right one for Kodak Gold 400 yet. I just haven’t liked the color I get when I use it. But it yielded surprisingly good color in my K1000 with this 55/1.8 lens. It’s still truer-than-life Kodak color, saturated, candylike. But it captured the dusky hues here pretty well, and that’s not something I expect from consumer-grade Kodak film.

Photography

Photo: Planter box on Illinois Street.

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Film Photography

Shooting the 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax lens

I am wasting my time shooting any normal prime lens on my Pentax cameras other than this 55mm f/1.8. Just look at this! Such color, such sharpness, such sensitive detail! On workaday Kodak Gold 400 no less!

At Second Presbyterian Church

On the same day I photographed Second Presbyterian Church with a 28mm lens, I brought my Pentax K1000 with this 55mm f/1.8 lens too. While that 28mm lens really brought this giant church into the frame, this 55mm lens did a much better job of capturing the church’s detailed beauty.

At Second Presbyterian Church

That Kodak Gold 400 surely likes red. And this lens handles beautifully.

At Second Presbyterian Church

I took the K1000 and this lens to several favorite photographic haunts, including Juan Solomon Park. I’ve shot its colorful playground many times since it opened several years ago.

At Juan Solomon Park

There’s actually been a playground here since before I moved to Indy in the 1990s. The city just redid it from the ground up when they used this park site for a building that is part of an expansion of sewage services to this part of the city. The old playground was fine, but the new one is top flight. I especially love the colorful play surface of soft replaceable tiles.

At Juan Solomon Park

I also took the K1000 over to Broad Ripple one chilly day for a walk. I’ve photographed this unusual bridge railing many times. The bridge was built in 1906, but a couple years ago the railing was altered. The row of blocks below the links was added, I assume to increase the railing’s height for safety. The purist in me thinks this was a shame.

Rainbow Bridge

I just thought the painting on this dumpster enclosure was interesting.

Dumpster Enclosure

I usually shoot my 50/1.4 SMC Pentax-M lens on my K-mount cameras, but it doesn’t deliver the color or detail that 55/1.8 does. I’ll just admit it: I use that 50/1.4 partially because of that vaunted 1.4 number, as if it says something about me as a photographer. Nuts to it. I’ll let my work do the talking. And with this 55/1.8, I’ll definitely have something to say.

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