Camera Reviews

Except that this takes 4 LR44 batteries and burns through them quick, this is a marvelous camera. It’s a Spotmatic minus the need to stop down plus aperture-priority shooting. Read my updated review here.

Pentax ES II

Updated review: Pentax ES II

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Film Photography, Preservation

Strolling through Lockerbie Square on Kodak Ektar 100

Lockerbie Square is the oldest surviving residential district in Indianapolis, and it’s wonderfully restored and preserved. I found myself there on a Downtown stroll with my Pentax ES II and a 55/1.8 SMC Takumar, Kodak Ektar 100 aboard.

Homes in Lockerbie

What a perfect time to photograph Lockerbie’s homes: the trees had just started to leaf, lending color and interest to my photos, but weren’t so full that they blocked the homes.

Little house in Lockerbie

It was also midevening. The sun’s warm light cast interesting shadows everywhere.

Lockerbie House

I occasionally encountered people on the street, residents I’m sure. None of them gave me and my camera a second glance. Perhaps Lockerbie is a frequent photo destination?

Street in Lockerbie

Even when you have no camera in your hands, Lockerbie is a charming evening stroll.

Lockerbie House

Lockerbie Square was built by immigrants, and most of its homes were constructed before 1910. By World War II, the neighborhood was in decline; many of these homes had become boardinghouses and apartments.

Door in Lockerbie

But from about the 1960s the neighborhood began to be restored. Some of these homes were in deplorable condition, but today every last one is well loved and well cared for.

The Riley home

On the only surviving cobblestone street in Indianapolis stands the former home of Lockerbie’s most famous resident, James Whitcomb Riley. In his day, he was an enormously famous Hoosier. The home is open for tours. I’ve done it twice, it’s so good. The house is very nearly as it was in Riley’s day, with most of the furniture being what Riley and the family with which he lived all used. This is as close to a time capsule house as you’ll ever find.

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Row houses

Row houses
Pentax ES II, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Takumar
Kodak Ektar 100
2015

Film Photography
Image

Tulpen

Tulpen
Pentax ES II, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Takumar
Kodak Ektar 100
2015

Film Photography
Image
Camera Reviews

Pentax ES II

The 1964 Pentax Spotmatic, the first 35mm SLR to offer through-the-lens light metering, set the template for pretty much every popular SLR that followed. But the Spotmatic required moving a little lever to activate the meter. And you had to set both aperture and shutter speed yourself. The horror.

Pentax’s engineers worked tirelessly to relieve photographers worldwide of their lever pushing and dial twisting. They triumphed in 1971 with the Electro Spotmatic, which added open-aperture metering and aperture-priority autoexposure. The celebrating ended quickly, however: the Electro Spotmatic proved to be unreliable. Pentax followed quickly with the improved ES, but even that camera had its problems. Pentax didn’t get it right until 1973 when they released the ES II.

Pentax ES II

To make open-aperture metering work, the well-regarded M42 screw-mount Takumar lenses received a slight modification: a tab that let the camera’s exposure system read the lens’s aperture. This coincided with the introduction of Super Multi Coating, Pentax’s advanced lens-coating technology. If you shoot one of these cameras with lenses not marked Super-Multi-Coated or SMC, you lose open-aperture metering and autoexposure. The camera then works like any other Spotmatic, with all that lever pushing and dial twisting.

Pentax ES II

With non-SMC lenses you also get a narrow range of shutter speeds: 1/50, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, and 1/1000 sec. Screw on an SMC Takumar and twist the aperture ring to A, and suddenly these cameras’ shutters fire from 8 sec to 1/1000 sec steplessly — if 1/382 sec gets the right exposure, that’s what the camera chooses.

Pentax ES II

This electro-wizardry needs four SR44 button batteries. Most other 1970s-80s aperture-priority SLRs need just one or two. And the ES II burns through those batteries fast. I forgot to turn off my ES II one time, and when I picked it up again two days later, all four batteries were dead, dead, dead.

By the way, if you like these screw-mount Pentaxes, also see my reviews of the Spotmatic SP (here), the Spotmatic F (here), and the H3 (here). You might also like the K-mount Pentaxes; see my reviews of the K1000 (here), the KM (here), and the ME (here). Or check out all of my camera reviews here.

My ES II came with two lenses: a 55mm f/1.8 SMC Takumar and a 135mm f/3.5 SMC Takumar. I screwed on the 55mm lens, loaded a roll of Arista Premium 400, and took the ES II out onto the road. Here’s my favorite shot from that roll, which I took in Michigantown on the Michigan Road.

300

The 55mm f/1.8 Takumar is widely regarded as a great lens, pin sharp. So I was a little let down by how soft these photos turned out. To see what this lens is capable of, check out the photos on this page.

Ganders Visitors

That softness shows up best at larger resolutions, so if you’re curious, click any of these photos to open them on Flickr and enlarge them there.

Augusta Station

I had a fine time shooting the ES II, however. It handled great. It’s a little heavy in the hands, but then this camera is made entirely of metal.

White Lion Antiques

I took a couple photos with the 135mm f/3.5 SMC Takumar and was even more disappointed with how soft my photos turned out. See this page to see the sharpness this lens can deliver. But do enjoy my neighbor’s ’67 Chrysler.

'67 Chrysler

I wondered: did I have the lenses screwed on tight? Was there something wrong with my lenses or with the camera? I wanted to try to figure it out. So I loaded some Kodak Ektar 100 and kept shooting. Sharpness improved noticeably. I don’t know why.

Bell

I took the ES II downtown one evening for a photo walk along Massachusetts Avenue. The Old Point Tavern is an old Indianapolis bar. They make a great bowl of chili.

Old Point Tavern

Here’s another of those pedal-powered beer bars like the one I shared in this post. The fellow looking directly at the camera actually called out something unkind to me after I snapped this shot.

Pedaling for beer

You’ll find racks full of these yellow rental bikes all over downtown. I never see any of the bikes in use; the racks are always full.

Bikeshare

I’ve shot this shrub in my next-door-neighbor’s yard six or seven times now with various cameras but have never been satisfied with the photos — until now. This is exactly what I have been trying to capture about this bush. Don’t ask me to describe what it is, though; I can’t.

Shrub

To see more from this camera, check out my Pentax ES II gallery.

I’d like to put a roll of Kodak T-Max through my ES II to see how my Takumars like that low-grain film. That’s a good sign: I know I really like a camera when I imagine the next roll of film I’ll shoot in it. The speed with which the ES II burns through batteries bothers me a little, but not so much that I wouldn’t shoot this camera again.

If you like old film cameras, check out all of my reviews here!
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Tracks

Tracks
Pentax ES II, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Takumar, Arista Premium 400
2015

Film Photography
Image