Cameras, Photography

Nikon N8008

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I did not need another auto-everything 35mm SLR. But in what is probably my greatest guilty pleasure, which says something about my buttoned-down life, I really enjoy them. I’m no less devoted to my first love: all-manual, all-metal SLRs! Yet I was deeply tempted when I came upon this Nikon N8008 body at KEH for $13.

Nikon N8008

I resisted. But that afternoon KEH emailed me an offer of 12% off used gear and I was a goner. Twenty dollars shipped for a body that cost $857 new. Pennies on the original dollar! Now is the time to buy these higher-end auto-everything film SLRs. And the N8008 (known as the F-801 in most of the rest of the world) was higher end, as it rested just below the pro-grade F4 in Nikon’s pecking order.

Nikon N8008

Befitting its station, its specs are solid. They begin with a big, bright, high-eyepoint viewfinder, which means you can see through it perfectly even when you’re wearing glasses. It offers both matrix and 75% center-weighted metering. Its shutter operates from 30 seconds to 1/8000 second and it takes film from ISO 6 to 6400 (and it reads the film’s DX coding). It syncs with flash at 1/250 second. And common AA batteries power it all.

Nikon N8008

It offers all of the modern modes: manual, programmed, aperture-priority, and shutter-priority. But as you can see, it was designed before the mode wheel became idiom. You expect that from a camera made from 1988 to 1990. To set mode, you have to repeatedly press the Mode button and look at the LCD. It works fine and isn’t cumbersome. It just takes a minute to adjust to it.

The N8008 also offers depth-of-field preview, allows multiple exposures, and boasts a self timer that can take two shots in succession. And its focusing screens exchange. Three screens are available, including the matte Type B screen that shipped with the N8008. You could also get the gridded Type E screen and the microprism Type J screen.

This camera also takes most F-mount lenses. Nikon lens compatibility requires a secret decoder ring (Ken Rockwell keeps his up to date) but with a few exceptions and caveats (pre-AI lenses won’t mount, AF-S lenses won’t automatically focus, AF-G lenses work only in programmed or shutter-priority mode, the latest AF-P lenses won’t focus) you can use your legacy lenses on the N8008.

I considered mounting my 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor to this camera just to test that compatibility. The moment passed quickly, a fleeting shadow. I reached instead for my 28-80mm f/3.3-5.6G AF Nikkor, a “gelded” lens that has no aperture ring. The N8008 drives this lens beautifully in P (program) or S (shutter-priority) modes. Even though Nikon shipped this lens with bajillions of its entry-level film SLRs, don’t underestimate this solid performer.

I loaded some fresh Kodak Tri-X and went to work at home, right next to my easy chair. I’d just finished a finger of whiskey. Photograph drunk, Photoshop sober?

Empty whiskey glass

I stepped back and zoomed out, revealing this lens’s one major fault: barrel distortion at the wide end. I reduced the effect in Photoshop.

Illuminated whiskey glass

These well-made auto-everything SLRs appeal to me, I think, because I can get high-quality images with almost zero thinking. That’s not to say I don’t like thinking. I get full joy from shooting my manual-exposure, manual-focus cameras. But sometimes it feels good to let the camera do all the work for you, all the while leaving you confident of good results. And with the N8008, I could have full control if I wanted it.

I never wanted it on this test roll. Good thing, as the gelded lens sharply limited my options. But on a stroll down Zionsville’s Main Street I didn’t much care. I twisted in my zoom level, pressed the button halfway to focus, and then pressed the button the rest of the way to get the shot. With a loud zip, the camera wound to the next frame and I was ready to go again.

Black Dog Books

I did, however, fall pray to one pitfall of easy-peasy shooting: I shot indiscriminately. Lots of uninteresting photos was the predictable result. This post shares almost all of the photos I think have any merit from this 36-exposure roll.

Brick Street Inn

Here Margaret stands between our two Fords in the parking lot at work. I used to work not far from her workplace, a large suburban church where she’s in charge of buildings and grounds. She wears dresses on Mondays to remind her co-workers that she’s a woman after all, as otherwise it’s jeans and T-shirts because a Director of Facilities never knows when she’ll find herself cleaning up after a sick child or crawling around a failed baptistry heater.

Margaret on Dress Monday

My sons have always been curious about my cameras. When they were very small I used to get the boxes down from my closet and we’d play with them together, cameras strewn across the living room. As I got serious about my collection again in my 40s and began to shoot my cameras more, my sons often asked if they could shoot them too. Frankly, I wasn’t always thrilled to say yes. They showed no real interest in exposure and focus, so explaining it to them got us nowhere. I took to setting the camera for them, but they were often impatient as I read the light and guessed distance and all. But a camera like the N8008 is perfect for kid use, even if that kid just turned 18. It requires no explanation beyond “press the button halfway so it can focus and then the rest of the way to get the shot.” My son did that perfectly while we waited for dinner at a Perkins one evening.

Me, taken by my son

Finally, I took the N8008 along the day I visited this abandoned bridge. It’s the one that cemented my love of exploring the old roads, because finding abandoned infrastructure is strangely exciting.

Abandoned US 40 bridge near Plainfield, IN

The N8008 is not without its flaws. It’s a little heavy for all-day use. The loud winder was annoying. Autofocus is slower than on a modern camera. But so bloody what? I don’t shoot sports anyway. This camera worked great, full stop.

But I still own a Nikon N90s, also a wonderful auto-everything 35mm SLR. One does not need both cameras. One does not need a hundred cameras stuffed into every nook and cranny of one’s house, either, but that’s where one is despite ongoing efforts to thin the herd.

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Photography

Nikon Nikkormat EL

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Why didn’t Nikon just call its non-pro line of cameras Nikons from the start? As they eventually learned, everyday people would pay for the cachet of the Nikon name. Yet Nikon insisted on calling its lesser SLRs Nikkormats (or Nikomats in Japan) in the 1960s and much of the 1970s.

Those Nikkormats became more and more sophisticated over time. By 1972 Nikon had developed its first camera with an electronic shutter and automatic exposure, and gave it a Nikkormat name. Here it is, the Nikkormat EL.

Nikon Nikkormat EL

Large and heavy, the Nikkormat EL offered a reasonable complement of features. Its shutter operates from 4 to 1/1000 sec. It offers depth-of-field preview, mirror lockup, and a self timer. A stubby 6-volt 4LR44 (aka 476A, A544, and PX28A) battery powers it all. It goes in a slot behind the lens mount, under the mirror. Use the mirror lockup lever (left of the lens mount) to move the mirror up. Then lift the battery cover and insert the battery. I thought I’d have trouble seating the battery in that tight space but I snapped it right in with my index finger.

Nikon Nikkormat EL

The Nikkormat EL’s viewfinder is fairly big and bright and features an easy-to-read match-needle system for the aperture-priority autoexposure. There’s no on-off switch; to activate the meter, pull the winding lever back. The EL’s focusing screen offers a central split-image rangefinder ringed with a microprism. It works beautifully. The white button left of the viewfinder checks the battery. Press it in with your thumbnail. If the battery is good, the amber light glows.

Nikon Nikkormat EL

With this Nikkormat Nikon moved closer to the classic 1970s SLR idiom by moving the shutter speed selector to a dial atop the camera, next to the wind lever. (Early Nikkormats placed the shutter speed selector on a ring around the lens mount.) And as you can see, the EL takes films from 25 to 1600 ISO.

Nikon finally got the clue when it updated this camera for 1977: it became the Nikon EL, the first Nikon SLR without removable prisms and focus screens. The Nikkormat line was allowed to die quietly.

This EL was placed on permanent loan in the Jim Grey Home for Wayward Cameras by John Smith, who generally buys his gear in top shape. The EL is said to be prone to electronic gremlins, but this one works fine.

I dropped some Fujicolor 200 in, mounted my 55mm f/2.8 Micro-Nikkor lens, and got to shooting. I love to do close-up work and the Micro-Nikkor enables it so well. Yet it’s a fine lens for shooting things at greater distance. These are the reading glasses I keep on my desk at work.

Cheaters

And here’s a gripping photo for the annals of all-time greats: the cruise-control switch on my Toyota. I love it that the Micro-Nikkor lens lets me contemplate details like this.

Cruise Control

These batteries came out of a flash unit for my Kodak Brownie Hawkeye. They have to be 50 years old, and true to their marketing, they hadn’t leaked. However, in especially dim indoor light, either the meter didn’t read accurately or the long shutter speed was off, because the exposure was terrible. Photoshop helped make something usable out of the frame.

Marathon Batteries

I shot most of this roll around the house. Last year I moved my irises to a sunnier spot, and this year they rewarded me by blooming in the spring and in the autumn. It was refreshing to see a splash of purple and white among the fall colors! Unfortunately, first frost came before the plant finished blooming, which did the remaining flowers in.

Autumn Irises

We had some striking light one evening, so I went out to photograph it.

Strange Evening Light

This light lasted just a few minutes, before the setting sun and the clouds rolling in obscured it. How often do we get light like this but forget it because it is so fleeting?

Strange Evening Light

Finally, showing that I had nothing but fine art on my mind while testing this camera, here’s my Toyota with a load of sod in the back. Some of the grass I planted in the front yard after the sewer connection project had died, and I had lots of bare spots out back after having all those dead trees removed. My Toyota has become an old beater, so it’s just right for dirty hauling jobs. Its plastic floor is easy to clean.

Wagon Full of Sod

For more photos, check out my Nikon Nikkormat EL gallery.

Metal, mostly mechanical 35mm SLRs are my favorite kind of camera, and aperture priority is my favorite way to autoexpose, so of course I enjoyed shooting with the Nikkormat EL. I didn’t enjoy shooting it any more than any of the other mostly mechanical 35mm SLRs I own, though. I suppose it says a lot about the general goodness of SLRs from the 1970s that a camera as capable and well made as this one doesn’t rise above the rest.

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Cameras, Photography

Vacation camera audition: Nikon N2000 with 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor lens

I think I was made to shoot 35mm SLRs. I am happiest using them, and consistently get my best results from them. So despite wishing for a pocketable compact camera for my upcoming trip to Ireland, I also decided to audition an SLR.

My ideal SLR for this trip would be small and light — and one over which I would not cry if it were damaged, lost, or stolen. As much as I love my pro Nikons, the F2 and F3, they are none of these things.

Nikon N2000

Not pictured: the 35mm f/2.8 lens

But my N2000 checks most of those boxes. My Pentax ME and Olympus OM-1 are noticeably smaller, but are no lighter thanks to the N2000’s polycarbonate body. And should I need to replace it, N2000 bodies can be had on eBay every day for under $30.

The N2000 has many useful features, first among them being programmed autoexposure for times I want to just point, focus, and shoot. It also offers aperture-priority autoexposure and manual exposure for when I want more control. It also winds the film automatically, and is powered by four common-as-pennies AAA batteries.

Because I wanted to shoot a 35mm lens on this trip, I bought one: the 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor. And then I dropped in some Kodak T-Max 400, clipped a shoulder strap to the lugs, and went out. Except for the jarringly loud motorized winder, this camera handled beautifully.

Sunlight over the gazebo

I got beautiful tones everywhere I turned with this 35mm lens and the T-Max.

Trail

The film and lens did have a little trouble with Margaret’s white hair here, though.

Margaret

I was impressed with how this camera, lens, and film managed scenes with both bright and dark areas. I did, however, tweak a few scans (including this one) in Photoshop to lighten the shadow areas a little.

Garfield Park north

Moving up close with this 35mm lens I was able to get a reasonable blurred-background effect. I shot this whole roll in program mode, and I like very much how the N2000 biases toward shallow depth of field at close range.

Bucket o' flowers

I almost always shoot 50mm lenses on my SLRs with their relatively narrow field of view. This 35mm lens let me see so much more of my surroundings.

Village Yarn Shop

I’ve tried to capture this ice-cream shop with my 50mm lenses before, and I can’t back up far enough on this street to get it all in without first bumping into another building. The 35mm lens opened the view up wide, and the house fit right in.

The Scoop

I fell in love with this 35mm lens. Now I want one for my Pentax K-mount SLRs, too. This is just a wonderful focal length for walking around in the world.

This 35mm Nikkor is also plenty small and light. On this light N2000 body, I barely felt this camera when it was slung over my shoulder. It’s bigger, of course, than the Olympus Stylus I reviewed on Friday, and the Olympus XA that I’m auditioning as I write this. But given how much I enjoyed using this camera and how much control it gave me over my images, this N2000 and this 35mm lens stand at least an even chance of going to Ireland with me.

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Cameras, Photography

Nikon N90s

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A sure sign that we live in remarkable times: I bought this Nikon N90s body, which retailed new for anywhere between $700 and $1000, for just $27.

Twenty-seven bucks for this professional-caliber 35mm SLR with more features than I will ever be able to use. And I tried: I shot three rolls of film before writing this review, but barely scratched the surface of what this camera can do.

Nikon N90s

Nikon made the N90s (F90X outside of North America) from 1994 to 2001. It superseded the earlier, very similar N90/F90, which was made from 1992 to 1994. Nikon aimed these cameras at advanced amateurs and as alternate bodies for pro photographers who otherwise shot the F4.

Don’t let the plastic body fool you: this metal-framed camera is built for rugged use. It doesn’t take much Internet searching to find stories of N90s’s that kept shooting after harrowing treatment.

Nikon N90s

This camera has so much going on it would take me five paragraphs to describe it all. But a few key facts: its shutter operates from 30 seconds down to a super-fast 1/8000 sec., and it takes film from ISO 6 to 6,400. It offers four exposure modes (program, shutter-priority, aperture-priority, and manual) and three metering modes (spot, center-weighted, and 3D matrix). You get all of those exposure and metering modes when you use AF-D Nikkor lenses; you lose some of those modes with AF-G and plain AF Nikkor lenses and more of them with AI Nikkor lenses. If you’d like to know more, check out the details at camera-wiki.org.

The N90s was designed before the now-ubiquitous mode dial was invented. To select modes and settings, you have to press various buttons and spin the dial that’s to the right of the LCD panel. It works well enough, but it’s tricky to learn.

Not obvious: how to rewind the film. Simultaneously press both buttons that have a film canister on them. Also, you can reset the camera to its defaults by pressing both green-dot buttons simultaneously. Some users recommend doing this with each fresh roll of film, so you don’t end up with some wacky setting from the last roll messing up your shots.

The camera came with a couple rolls each of expired ISO 400 Fuji and Kodak color film. I was so eager to shoot this camera that I loaded a roll of the Fuji right away. Loading is simple: drop in the cartridge, draw the film leader to the red line, close the back. I also dropped in the four AA batteries the camera needs to do anything and mounted a 28-80 mm f/3.3-5.6G AF Nikkor lens that I already owned. It was after dark, so I just shot things around the house on my tripod. That lens lacks an aperture ring, so I could shoot only in Program mode. Here’s my kitchen and dining room.

Kitchen and dining room

And here’s a glass of the rye whiskey I was sipping that night, along with some miscellaneous desk clutter. The camera handled flawlessly.

My favorite sippin' glass

This is what I was sipping: High West Double Rye. All of these shots had a lot of noise and grain, which I blame on the expired film. I boosted levels in Photoshop but then used this new-to-me software called LUCiD that offers a bunch of quick fixes to challenged images. It smoothed out that noise pretty well.

High West

Oh my gosh, was that fun. I wanted to go deeper. So I bought a 50mm f/1.8 AF Nikkor lens off eBay and ran a roll of fresh Eastman Double-X 5222 through the N90s. Meet my lawn tractor’s port flank. The tractor is dark green in real life, but that Double-X deepens dark colors. I think my tractor would look awesome in all black.

Craftsman tractor

I learned too late that if I had bought the “D” version of this lens, I could have taken advantage of the N90s’s 3D matrix metering. But even without it, this camera delivered flawless exposures. And that wonderful Double-X film delivered its signature contrast. This is a detail of the lamp on the desk where I write this blog.

Lamp detail

This is my next-door neighbor’s new dog. Good grief, does he bark. And bark and bark and bark.

Neighbor's dog

Margaret and I traveled to Woodstock, Illinois, in a blinding snowstorm to see her older sister get married. I brought the N90s, that 50mm lens, and some Arista Premium 400 to document the day as best I could. This is the interior of the First United Methodist Church.

Inside Woodstock First UMC *EXPLORED*

Some people find the N90s’s autofocus system to be slow. My demands of autofocus are usually light; the N90s focused fast enough for me. And it absolutely nailed exposure every time.

Inside Woodstock First UMC

I finished the roll Downtown. We had an unusually warm December, just right for a late-year photo walk. Here’s a trashy alleyway.

Trash

This is the Anthem Insurance building on Monument Circle. Long before I moved to Indianapolis, this building was a windowless JCPenney store.

Anthem

Finally, here’s a scene from the Indiana War Memorial that shows off that 50mm f/1.8 lens’s sharpness.

At the Indiana War Memorial

To see more photos, check out my Nikon N90s gallery.

Even though I’m much more a manual-focus kind of guy, there are times when autofocus shooting is the way to go. I’ve tried before with Nikon’s N60 and the N65, but found these consumer cameras’ limitations to be frustrating. In contrast, the N90s handled absolutely everything I threw at it and returned flawless exposures every time.

The N90s is a keeper.


Do you like old film cameras? Then check out all my reviews!

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Cameras, Photography

Nikon Nikomat FTn

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Until the late 1970s, Nikon-branded 35mm SLR cameras were designed, built, and priced for pro photographers. But Nikon figured amateurs would buy SLRs, too, if they were priced right. But Nikon feared diluting their brand, and so gave consumer cameras other names.

Nikon’s first go, 1960’s Nikkorex, never caught on. Nikon simply guessed wrong at what features amateurs wanted. Moreover, Nikon outsourced manufacture, and whispers of reliability problems hurt sales. So Nikon tried again with an all-new camera built in Nikon factories. The Nikomat (in Japan, Nikkormat in the rest of the world) was born, starting with the 1965 Nikomat FT. Recently, a Japanese Nikomat was generously donated to the Jim Grey Home for Wayward Cameras. It’s this 1967-1975 Nikomat FTn.

Nikon Nikomat FTn

Consumer SLR photographers, it turned out, wanted through-the-lens metering, fast shutters, and interchangeable lenses. The Nikomat/Nikkormat line obliged, and could take the entire range of Nikkor lenses that were designed for Nikon’s professional F-series cameras. But the Nikomats lack the F’s interchangeable viewfinders and focusing screens, and can’t take motor drives. Also, there’s no hot shoe. A clip-on accessory shoe was available, and a flash could be plugged into M (flashbulb) or X (electronic flash) terminals.

Nikon Nikomat FTn

But much like the venerable F, the Nikomat FTn is built like a tank. It feels more substantial than either of my Nikon F2s. It boasts a mechanical vertical focal-plane shutter with speeds from 1 to 1/1000 second. You set shutter speed on the lens barrel, and the speed is visible in the viewfinder. It also features center-weighted average through-the-lens metering. Pull the wind lever back a little to activate the meter, and then adjust shutter speed and aperture until the needle in the viewfinder is between the + and – symbols. Alternatively, you can use the meter display on the top plate next to the rewind lever. Adjust exposure until the meter is centered in the o symbol. The FTn also offers depth-of-field preview and mirror lockup. It takes film from 12 to 1600 ASA.

A dreaded, banned 625 mercury battery required to run the meter. Fortunately, everything else about the FTn functions without a battery. I substituted an alkaline 625 cell. To heck with everybody who says this will result in misexposures. As you’ll see, it wasn’t an issue at all.

I usually test a new-to-me camera with inexpensive color film. But some cameras, this Nikomat among them, feel like they want to be tested with black-and-white film. So I loaded my next-to-last roll of dear, departed Arista Premium 400 and took this camera out and about. I used the 50mm f/2 Nikkor H-C lens that came with the camera. And oh. my. gosh. what results I got.

My sons and I went Downtown to Monument Circle for dinner at Potbelly’s, my older son’s favorite place. This duo provided a little live music, right next to the soda dispenser.

Music at Potbelly's

I stepped back a little for this lonely shot of the guitarist. The FTn’s focusing screen offers only a microprism, which makes out-of-focus images look jagged. My middle-aged eyes prefer split-image focusing, but I managed to get focus right in every shot with the FTn.

Music at Potbelly's

Monument Circle was packed to the gills with people and motorcycles that evening. It was some sort of big biker event. It clogged up Downtown; the closest parking we could find was about five blocks away.

Bikes

But the extra walking didn’t matter, because we wanted to walk around Downtown anyway. We walked along Massachusetts Avenue, one of Indy’s four diagonal streets. It’s become quite the night spot in the past ten years or so. Stout’s Shoes is one of the last regular retailers remaining here. It’s the oldest shoe store in America.

The oldest shoe store in America

My brother lives a couple blocks off “Mass Ave,” as we all call it. I’m kind of jealous, because whenever he gets an itch to get out, he can just walk a little to reach any number of great watering holes.

Chatham Tap

I brought the FTn along when Margaret and I surveyed the wayfinding signs along the Michigan Road in Marion and Shelby Counties. The Allied Appliances storefront in Wanamaker is a real throwback, and clearly it gets regular love to stay looking this good.

Allied Appliances

We lingered in Founder’s Cemetery at Wanamaker’s southern outskirts. A few gravestones are fenced off. I moved in close to one of the posts and got this great shot. It was a blisteringly bright day, the kind that makes some of my cameras struggle. But the Nikomat handled the light with aplomb.

Fencepost

I don’t know who Adam Nossman was, but this photo of his gravestone turned out fine.

Adam Nossman

I took the FTn on one of my three (!) trips to the Indiana State Fair this year, which is where I finished the roll.

Moo

To see more photos from this camera, click here to see my Nikomat FTn gallery.

There’s a stiffness about all of the 1960s 35mm SLRs I own, this Nikomat FTn included. Maybe they all need a cleaning, lube, and adjustment. Maybe they’re just built that way. Who knows. Truth is, my 1970s and 1980s SLRs work much more fluidly and are slightly more pleasant for me to use. But this Nikomat FTn wasn’t so stiff as to be unpleasant, and these outstanding results make me want to shoot it again and again.

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Cameras, Photography

The year of the Nikon F2

I’ve learned so much from you film photographers whose blogs I follow and who follow my blog. I don’t remember which of you said it first — was it Mike Connealy? — but more than one of you suggested that you’d become a much better photographer if you’d just stick to one camera. I thought about that idea often. I love shooting different cameras, but I also want to get better at making pictures.

So I decided that in 2014 I would primarily use one film camera. I wouldn’t rule out buying a new camera here and there and putting a test roll through it, and I would still use my digital camera for all the things it’s good for. But for film shots, I’d use one camera for almost all of them, and I’d put extra time and energy into shooting with that camera.

I chose my Pentax ME to be the camera. I liked its smaller size and lighter weight. I love its aperture-priority shooting. And I have fine collection of SMC Pentax lenses for it.

But then John Smith threw a monkey wrench into the works. First, he sent me a Nikon F2A and said, “Some were born to shoot the F2; we will see if you are among them.” I had a great time with that F2. John declared me so born, and sent me another F2, this time an F2AS — and one that had been overhauled to new operating condition by Sover Wong, the world’s foremost F2 expert. And then he sent me a smattering of AI Nikkor lenses to go with it.

Nikon F2AS

I immediately abandoned my Pentaxian plans and became a Nikonian for 2014. And then I watched my work steadily improve all year. My composition and use of light both got a lot stronger, both through deliberate repetition and through trying to emulate some of the things I see in your photographs. Also, freed from the hindrance of constantly fiddling with new cameras, I found myself more and more using the F2AS well without thinking. I was able to think entirely about my photographs; my hands increasingly automatically worked the F2AS to get the look I wanted.

I am so happy I did this!

For 2015, I plan to leave black-and-white film in the F2AS, and color film in the F3HP John also sent me, and use them as my go-to cameras. I’ll resume buying cameras, too — even though my interest in collecting has waned, I can’t ignore that my camera posts are enormously popular. I’m also going to revisit some old favorite cameras — first among them being my old (and well loved) Pentax ME, just to see how it feels to me now.

Here are some photos from my F2AS that appealed to me today as I reviewed the work I’ve done this year.

Agfa Clack

Agfa Clack. 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor, Ilford Delta 400

St. Paul's Episcopal Church

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. 35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 Zoom-Nikkor, Ilford Delta 400

Expired

Expired. 55mm f/2.8 Micro Nikkor, Kodak Gold 400 (very expired)

On the Monon Trail

On the Monon Trail. 35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 Zoom-Nikkor, Kodak Tri-X (expired 2002)

Old cars under an awning

Old cars under an awning. 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor, Kodak Plus-X (expired, cold stored)

1950 Hudson Commodore

1950 Hudson Commodore. 50mm f/2 AI-Nikkor, Kodak Plus-X Pan (expired, cold stored)

Lady Ornament

Lady Ornament. 50mm f/2 AI-Nikkor, Kodak T-Max 400

Grape hyacinth

Grape hyacinth. 55mm f/2.8 Micro-Nikkor, Fujifilm Fujicolor 200

Main Street, Casey, IL

Main St., Casey, IL. 35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 Zoom-Nikkor, Fujifilm Fujicolor 200

Lavender

Lavender. 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor, Kodak Ektar 100

Evening light at Oldfields *EXPLORED*

Evening light at Oldfields. 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor, Kodak Ektar 100

Margaret

Margaret. 135mm f/3.5 AI Nikkor, Fujifilm Fujicolor 200

Farmall *EXPLORED*

Farmall. 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor, Fujifilm Superia Xtra 800

In transition

In transition. 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor, Fujifilm Velvia 50

Red tree parking lot *EXPLORED*

Red tree parking lot. 135mm f/3.5 AI Nikkor, Fujifilm Velvia 50

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