The Harbour Bar, Portrush

The Harbour Bar
Nikon N2000, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor
Kodak T-Max 400
2016

This isn’t the best ever photo of this historic bar in Portrush, Northern Ireland. But it’s a great memory of meeting fellow photoblogger Michael McNeill.

Photography, Travel
Image
Film Photography, Travel

Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400

We wrapped our time in Ireland in Dublin. I shot every step on Kodak T-Max 400 film.

A river runs through Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film

You might think we’d start in Dublin. After all, our flight in did land at the Dublin airport. Yet we immediately boarded a train and hightailed it to Galway. It’s how Margaret wanted it, as after all that’s where her family is from! And as we looked over all the places we could visit across Ireland, places within driving distance of Galway kept edging out places in Dublin.

But we knew that at the end of our trip we knew we wouldn’t want to rush back to Dublin just to board a plane. We would want to regroup for a day or two first. So we booked a hotel in Dublin.

We had been having a truly amazing trip, with outstanding experience after outstanding experience. Our astounding luck had to run out sometime, and it did in Dublin. Nothing truly bad happened. It was merely an average time. After the fabulous experiences we’d been having, average was quite a comedown.

What’s a trip to Dublin without visiting the Guinness mother ship at St James’s Gate? It was the first thing we did. For 20 euros you can take a tour. But they don’t actually brew Guinness here anymore; the place is more like a museum now. A very noisy and crowded museum, from which you can exit only through an enormous gift shop. At least we got to pour our own Guinness as part of the tour, though it was nearly impossible to find a quiet corner to sit down and drink it. If you’re going to Dublin, pass on this.

Guinness on Kodak T-Max 400 film

On our way back to the hotel we had dinner at the oldest pub in all of Ireland (or so it promoted itself). The food was great but the service was criminally slow. After 45 minutes of waiting to pay our bill, both of us seriously considering simply stiffing the joint, our waiter finally passed by. He obviously and deliberately ignored me. I had to block his way and almost force him to take my credit card.

Inside the oldest pub in Ireland on Kodak T-Max 400 film

The next morning we thought we’d go see the Book of Kells at nearby Trinity College. It cost 20 euros to get in — and the mile-long line moved glacially. Worse, photography was prohibited inside. Unwilling to spend our whole morning in a queue to see something we couldn’t photograph, we walked around campus for a minute to process our disappointment and then moved on.

Trinity University on Kodak T-Max 400 film
Trinity University on Kodak T-Max 400 film

Unsure what to do with our day, we looked at Google Maps on our phones and saw that a large park wasn’t too far away. We decided to walk over and rest for a while. We passed through a shopping district on our way.

Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film
Dublin street scene on Kodak T-Max 400 film
Dublin street scene on Kodak T-Max 400 film

The park is called St. Stephen’s Green, and it is lovely and quiet, a sharp contrast to how we’d experienced Dublin so far. We spent hours here, walking and holding hands, talking and taking photographs. We left feeling refreshed. I’ll share some color photos I took here in an upcoming post.

St Stephen's Green in Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film
St. Stephen's Green in Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film
St. Stephen's Green in Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film
St. Stephen's Green in Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film
St. Stephen's Green in Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film
St. Stephen's Green in Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film

It was midafternoon and our stomachs were insistently reminding us it had been too long since our last meal. We reluctantly left the park and found a pub. It had a long row of Guinness taps, and Margaret asked the bartender if she could photograph them. “Sure,” he said, “but would you rather I photographed you pouring a pint at one?” Whaaaat? Absolutely! Unfortunately, those photos are in Margaret’s camera. But it was another highlight of our Dublin stay.

The Spire in Dublin on Kodak T-Max 400 film

So Dublin wasn’t a washout. We have some good memories, all recorded on Kodak T-Max 400 film. I’ll share a couple more in upcoming posts.

Nikon N2000 and 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor on Kodak T-Max 400.

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Dublin street scene

Dublin street scene
Nikon N2000, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor
Kodak T-Max 400
2016

I will probably never become a skilled street photographer. I’m okay with that, as I’m choosing to build my skills photographing other things. But sometimes I feel the urge to shoot on a crowded street, as I did here in Dublin. This shot draws me in. I can’t tell whether it’s because it’s good, or whether it’s bad enough that I just can’t look away.

Film Photography
Image

St. Stephen's Green

In St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin
Nikon N2000, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor
Kodak T-Max 400
2016

I shot a bunch of black and white in this lovely park, but the results were a mixed bag. I guess such a colorful place just needs to be shot in color. I thought the contrasts in this photo worked okay, though. The greenery (gray-ery?) framing the scene helps a lot, too.

Film Photography
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St. Stephen's Green

House in St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin
Nikon N2000, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor
Kodak T-Max 400
2016

It sure is taking me a while to share all of my photos and stories from Ireland! I’m a little more than halfway through our two-week trip now. Here’s a photo from near the end of the trip, in a lovely park well within Dublin.

Photography
Image
Film Photography, Travel

Rosses Point Beach in black and white

Why is it that beaches look so good in black and white?

Rosses Point Beach

I never would have guessed until I saw J. R. Smith’s photostream on Flickr. He lives on the northern California coast and photographs the beach in black and white all the time.

Rosses Point Beach

This beach isn’t in California — it’s in northwest Ireland. on a peninsula in County Sligo called Rosses Point.

Rosses Point Beach

Rosses Point is a peninsula with this beach, a harbor, and a small town. Famed poet William Butler Yeats spent his summers here when he was a boy.

Rosses Point Beach

We spent about an hour exploring this beach, and in that time dark clouds parted for full sun, only to yield to gray overcast. The changing sky is a lot of why we stayed so long: new light brought out new and interesting things to photograph.

Rosses Point Beach

My color photos of this beach do not at all show the scalloping in the sand.

Rosses Point Beach

We had other places we wanted to see this day so we reluctantly moved on.

Rosses Point Beach

Nikon N2000, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor, Kodak T-Max 400

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