Rainbow Bridge

The Rainbow Bridge in Broad Ripple
Pentax K1000, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax
Kodak Gold 400
2017

This bridge was built in 1906 to carry Guilford Avenue over the Central Canal in Indianapolis’s Broad Ripple neighborhood.

Underneath the deck, it’s a typical single-span concrete arch. What sets this bridge apart is its railings. The oval “links” are unique.

I have a dim memory from 25 or more years ago of the railings being painted in a more random color pattern. I have a clear memory of this railing being much shorter — in about 2013 a row of block was added underneath the links. See a photo of the shorter railing here. This was probably done to make it harder to fall off the bridge into the canal.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: The Rainbow Bridge in Broad Ripple

The Rainbow Bridge in Broad Ripple, an Indianapolis neighborhood.

Image
The Astronaut David Wolf Bridge

The Astronaut David Wolf Bridge
Kodak Signet 40
Kodak Gold 200
2011

This is the last truss bridge still standing in Indianapolis. It was built in 1941 to carry State Road 100 across the White River. Its two Parker through trusses are bookended by Warren pony trusses.

In 1941, this was way out in the country. The Indianapolis city limits were several miles to the south. But as the city expanded outward, as cities do, eventually this region became suburban, and this road became a major shopping destination. This road, and therefore this bridge, were no longer sufficient for the traffic volume.

Fortunately, sane heads prevailed. When the road was widened to four lanes in the late 1980s, a new two-lane bridge was built alongside this one to carry westbound traffic. This bridge was left in place to carry eastbound traffic. In 2008 it received a thorough restoration. Somewhere along the way, the city of Indianapolis named it after astronaut David Wolf, who was born and raised here.

This is a challenging bridge to photograph given its length and how many strip malls crowd the area. Once I made a through-the-windshield video when I crossed this bridge; you can see it here.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography, Road Trips

single frame: The Astronaut David Wolf Bridge

The story of the last truss bridge still standing in Indianapolis.

Image
A lane in the cemetery

A lane in the cemetery
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

If you think I’m milking this roll of Velvia I shot at Crown Hill Cemetery, you’re right.

Since our pastor quit at church, I’ve been attending a lot more meetings, and I had to prepare for my sermon last Sunday. It went fine, by the way. But it takes time and energy away from the blog.

Just you wait: on Monday I’m going to share the images from this roll that didn’t work out. They’re interesting in their own right.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: A lane in the cemetery

.

Image
At the gate

At the gate
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

The south entrance to Crown Hill Cemetery is down a side street off 38th Street in Indianapolis. The entrance is a giant concrete affair built in 1885, with several peaked arches and this blue-green gate. I like this gate and have photographed it many times.

I’ve put more rolls of film through my Yashica-12 this year than any other camera. As I’ve taught myself to develop black-and-white film this year, I reached for the 12 because of its excellent image quality. It’s been on my desk ever since, so it was a no-brainer to load this roll of Velvia into it.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: At the gate

.

Image
Riley's rest

Riley’s rest
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

Many people who visit Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis stop here, at the top of the highest hill in the city. This is where Hoosier poet James Whitcomb Riley is buried.

It’s hard to contemplate now, but Riley was as popular as any rock star in his day. Throngs would come to listen to him speak. His death in 1916 saddened the nation.

Riley had an unusually large presence in my life as I attended a high school in South Bend that was named for him. It was built just eight years after he died.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Riley’s rest

.

Image
Unknown U.S. Soldier

Unknown U.S. Soldier
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

The military cemetery within Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis is one of the largest in the nation. Countless rows of little markers just like this line a large section of the grounds.

In past visits I’ve looked and looked for an Unknown marker to photograph, always to no success. This time I was just walking by and caught this one out of the corner of my eye.

I cut the in-focus patch just a shade too thin on this photo. The marker is in focus but the fake flowers right in front of it are not.

If you’d like to get more of my photography in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Unknown U.S. Soldier

.

Image