Hjelmerstald, which means horse stable, is a street in the city center of Aalborg, a northern Denmark city. Dating to the mid 17th century, this old cobblestone street and its buildings have been well preserved.

On Hjelmerstald

When this street was new, it was on the southern outskirts of Aalborg. Today, it’s well within the city center, near the shopping district and any number of little cafes.

But being a Thursday doors post, let me get right to the doors. I captured an even dozen of them, all in portrait orientation, so be prepared to scroll!

On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald

This short L-shaped street is best viewed long, however. It is charming.

On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald
On Hjelmerstald

I’ve found little about Hjelmerstald’s history but I’ll recount what I’ve read. Initially, stable buildings lined this street, hence its name. By the late 1600s, homes began to appear here. By the 1800s, Hjelmerstald was home to regiments of soldiers as well as the poor of Aalborg. By the early 1900s, this was a bad neighborhood, one you didn’t want to visit unless you had to. But since then it’s been turned around and today is as lovely as you see it here.

This post is part of the Thursday Doors community.

Nikon Df, 28-200mm f/3.3-5.6 AF-G Nikkor

To get Down the Road in your inbox or reader six days a week, click here to subscribe!
To get my newsletter with previews of what I’m working on, click here to subscribe!

Travel

Thursday doors: Hjelmerstald

The beautiful doors of a historic street in Aalborg, Denmark.

Image
Travel

Boarding a plane like it’s 1962

Boarding a plane like it's 1962

Margaret and I spent the last nine days of August in Aalborg, Denmark. Aalborg is a far northern city in that small country in the south of Scandinavia, bordering Germany. The company I work for bought a small company there this year, and as we slowly integrate the companies the software engineers there came to report to me.

My boss said, “Would you like to go to Aalborg and get to know the team?” Why, sure! When I told my wife my boss was sending me to Aalborg, she said, “Correction: he’s sending us to Aalborg!” (Not at the company’s expense, to be clear!)

The flight over took about 14 hours, including layovers in Detroit and Amsterdam. Thank heavens we arrived at the Indianapolis airport plenty early, because we discovered there that one of our return flights had been canceled. The kind woman at the Delta counter rebooked our entire return flight on the spot, but it took about an hour to cut through a surprising amount of red tape.

We did not enjoy Schiphol, the Amsterdam airport. It was huge, signage was poor, and the queue to get our passports stamped was long and hot with attendants yelling at us to keep moving. At the gate for our flight to Aalborg, we were surprised to learn that we would not be boarding the plane there — instead we would board a bus that would take us to the plane. We boarded the plane via the pictured stairs. I’ve only ever seen that in old movies! Similarly, we deplaned via stairs in Aalborg.

I went to Aalborg primarily to work. Margaret took the opportunity to have a good vacation. We deliberately scheduled our time to include a weekend so that we could be tourists together for a couple days.

In days to come, I’ll have photos to show from Aalborg. I brought my Nikon Df and that 28-200mm zoom lens I bought recently, and my Pentax IQZoom 170SL point-and-shoot 35mm camera with a roll of Fujicolor 200 already inside (and partially shot back home), and a roll of Kosmo Foto Agent Shadow. I’ll have photos to share in the coming days!

To get Down the Road in your inbox or reader six days a week, click here to subscribe!
To get my newsletter with previews of what I’m working on, click here to subscribe!

Standard