In the bay at Rosses Point, Ireland, is this statue of a woman stretching her arms out toward the sea. Called Waiting on Shore, it was installed in 2002 to honor the women who used to wait for their men to return from their work at sea. Sometimes, those men didn’t make it home.

Waiting on Shore
Waiting on Shore
Waiting on Shore
Waiting on Shore

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Photography, Travel

Waiting on Shore

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Lyon's, Sligo

Henry Lyons & Co., Ltd.
Canon PowerShot S95
2016

Lyon’s is a department store in Sligo Town, County Sligo, Ireland.

Photography, Travel
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Rosses Point

In the bay at Rosses Point
Canon PowerShot S95
2016

Photography, Travel
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Film Photography, Travel

Rosses Point Beach in black and white

Why is it that beaches look so good in black and white?

Rosses Point Beach

I never would have guessed until I saw J. R. Smith’s photostream on Flickr. He lives on the northern California coast and photographs the beach in black and white all the time.

Rosses Point Beach

This beach isn’t in California — it’s in northwest Ireland. on a peninsula in County Sligo called Rosses Point.

Rosses Point Beach

Rosses Point is a peninsula with this beach, a harbor, and a small town. Famed poet William Butler Yeats spent his summers here when he was a boy.

Rosses Point Beach

We spent about an hour exploring this beach, and in that time dark clouds parted for full sun, only to yield to gray overcast. The changing sky is a lot of why we stayed so long: new light brought out new and interesting things to photograph.

Rosses Point Beach

My color photos of this beach do not at all show the scalloping in the sand.

Rosses Point Beach

We had other places we wanted to see this day so we reluctantly moved on.

Rosses Point Beach

Nikon N2000, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor, Kodak T-Max 400

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Film Photography, Photography, Travel

Touring the medieval abbey in Sligo

We found Sligo Abbey to be fascinating, but challenging to photograph. A ruin dating to the 13th century in the northwest Irish city of Sligo, it was full of interesting scenes and details. We could frame any of them with little trouble. But it was hard to create a sense of the whole in our lenses. You can’t back up enough to get it all in frame, as Sligo encroaches upon it from all sides. So here’s hoping that as I just dump a bunch of photos of the place here, you’ll get a feel for it all.

Sligo Abbey

Sligo Abbey

Sligo Abbey

Sligo Abbey

Despite being called an abbey (a community of monks or nuns living a cloistered life), this was actually a friary (a community of men who go out and preach), of the Dominican order. The Dominicans have always loved to go out and preach.

I did take a panoramic shot with my iPhone. It’s as close as I came to capturing Sligo Abbey’s scale, obvious distortion in the image notwithstanding. This is the cloister garth at the center of the abbey. This yard (and some of the corridors and rooms) were used as a cemetery, I think at some point after the site became a ruin.

Sligo Abbey

The place just begged to be shot in black and white, but I did get a few solid color shots.

Sligo Abbey

Sligo Abbey

Sligo Abbey

Nikon N2000, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor, Kodak T-Max 400
iPhone 6s
Canon PowerShot S95

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