NYC after dusk

Central Park
Canon PowerShot S95
2016

As someone who has always lived in flyover country, my only contact with New York City, specifically Manhattan, was in movies and on television. It wasn’t until I visited the city for the first time in the late 1980s that I started to get a feel for the place. It hardly matched what I had seen on the screen. That Manhattan was either clean and pretty, or dangerous and gritty. The Manhattan I met was just a very large city. A confusing city — it took three or four trips before I started to get a sense of direction in it, and was able to find my way without a guide.

I didn’t visit Central Park until my most recent trip there, in 2016. I wished I had not waited so long. It’s better than what the movies make it out to be — a well-designed, manicured, peaceful oasis right in the middle of this loud and busy place.

One evening on our last visit, we enjoyed a cocktail hour on the top floor of our hotel. This was the view from up there. It’s impressive just how large Central Park is, how much Manhattan real estate it claims.

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single frame: Central Park

A view from on high of New York City’s Central Park.

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Photography, Travel

The bridges of Central Park

Margaret took me and her two youngest to New York City this month. She bought a tour package, which took us on a cruise down the Hudson River and to a showing of Les Misérables on Broadway. Such outstanding experiences! But what I think I enjoyed a little more was Central Park, just two blocks away from our hotel.

Ahem. Why has nobody ever told me there are so many wonderful bridges there?!?!!!?!?

Our first visit was on the cold, gray day we arrived. This is Driprock Arch, built 1862 and moved to this location during the 1930s from elsewhere in the park. I wonder how you move a bridge made of bricks and concrete? Brick by brick?

In Central Park

This is Playmates Bridge and was built in 1861. I love how the red-cream stripes continue within the arch!

In Central Park

We returned for a longer stroll a couple days later, by which time the weather had greatly improved. This is the Bow Bridge, a cast-iron pedestrian bridge built 1859-62.

Central Park overlook

This is Bankrock Bridge, built 1860. A wooden bridge with I believe a cast-iron railing, it was restored in 2009. Check out all the people leaning against the railing and facing in. They’re all having their portraits taken — behind them is a stunning view of a lake and some of the city skyline. Margaret and I had someone take our portrait here, as well (with her camera, and I haven’t seen it yet!).

Central Park overlook

Here’s the view from the deck, without us.

Central Park overlook

I believe this is the Winterdale bridge, built 1860-61.

Central Park bridge

And this is the Reservoir Bridge Southwest, built 1864 of cast iron.

Central Park bridge

We didn’t see all of the bridges in the park, and in researching to write this post I think we missed a couple of the most beautiful bridges! That just gives us something to look forward to on a return trip someday.

Canon PowerShot S95, shot RAW, processed in Photoshop.

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Central Park overlook

Central Park overlook
Canon PowerShot S95
2016

Photography, Travel
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