Collecting Cameras

This Canon PowerShot S95 is my workhorse digital camera. I’ve made countless thousands of images with it. It’s from 2010, which makes it ancient by digital-camera standards. But it’s still a fine performer. I’ve updated my review here.

Canon PowerShot S95

Updated review: Canon PowerShot S95

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Stone arch bridge

1834 stone-arch bridge on the National Road
Canon PowerShot S95
2014

Because reader Peggy told me she likes my bridge posts, I’m going through my photo archives to share more interesting bridges.

Built in 1834, this bridge carries the nation’s first federally funded highway, the National Road, over this creek on the west edge of Marshall, Illinois. The National Road connected Cumberland, Maryland to Vandalia, Illinois, via Wheeling, West Virginia; Columbus, Ohio; and Indianapolis, Indiana.

You won’t find many US bridges older than this one, especially outside the original 13 colonies. It still carries traffic every day — and unless you know it’s there, you can’t tell that such ancient infrastructure is supporting your car as you drive over it.

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single frame: 1834 stone-arch bridge on the National Road

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We keep getting spectacular sunsets here in central Indiana. We probably have always gotten them, but I didn’t know it until I moved here with this almost unobstructed view. I shot all of these with the Canon PowerShot S95.

Sunset over the Toyota dealer
Sunset over the Toyota dealer
Sunset over the Toyota dealer
Sunset over the Toyota dealer

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More sunsets over the Toyota dealer

We get some spectacular sunsets in central Indiana. From my back door I have a mostly unobstructed view, but for the Toyota dealer.

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Road Trips

The Michigan City Uptown Arts District

In the heart of downtown Michigan City, at the end of the Michigan Road — or the beginning, depending on your perspective — you’ll find the Michigan City Uptown Arts District.

Michigan City Uptown Arts District. Map data © 2019 Google.

When I surveyed the Michigan Road in 2008, this was some mighty depressed real estate. But in 2010 the Uptown Arts District was formed, and a slow transformation began. The transformation remains underway today, but “there’s a there there,” as we say in the road-tripping business. You can spend a pleasant day here popping in and out of the boutique shops and galleries, and enjoying a meal and a pint at one of the several restaurants.

Margaret and I did this on the day before Thanksgiving, a blustery and gray day. There wasn’t much action on this midweek day-before-a-holiday, but we were pleased to find many shops and pubs open.

Michigan City Uptown Arts District

We spent most of our time on the Uptown Arts District’s main drag, Franklin Street. It’s a downtown strip typical of Indiana, with plenty of old buildings in a row.

Michigan City Uptown Arts District

Several striking buildings line this strip, including this one, a former Eagles lodge. I’d sure like to know the story of that crazy roof!

Michigan City Uptown Arts District

Lots of public art lines Franklin Street. I liked this little scene on one of the street corners.

Michigan City Uptown Arts District

Given how close this is to Lake Michigan, this wavelike metal sculpture makes perfect sense.

Michigan City Uptown Arts District

We capped our Uptown Arts District stroll with a visit to an Irish pub, where we had a couple remarkably good pints of Guinness. From there we could see were within walking distance of a large outlet mall, so we went over and did a little early Christmas shopping. All in all, it was a lovely day. If you’d like to have a similarly lovely day, it awaits you at the end of the Michigan Road.

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I’m still photographing the loveliest sunsets I see when I look out my back door, past the Toyota dealer. Here are the photos I’ve made since I last shared some with you.

Sunset over the Toyota dealer
Sunset over the Toyota dealer
Sunset over the Toyota dealer

I used my Canon S95 for all of these as it is always on my desk, steps from the back door. A couple of these photos strained its low-light performance so I increased the blacks in Photoshop to hide the shadow clipping.

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A few more Toyota sunsets

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Photography, Travel

Favorite photos from New Harmony

My main camera on our trip to New Harmony was, as often happens, my little Canon PowerShot S95. I did take a film camera, my Olympus XA2, loaded with Ultrafine Xtreme 100. But it simply turned out not to be a black-and-white weekend. I shot but nine frames. In contrast, I made 175 photos with the S95.

This is New Harmony’s Main Street. It’s perpendicular to the road that you have to use to enter New Harmony, which is Church Street and also State Road 66.

Around New Harmony

We got a spectacular sunset that night. In the shadowy foreground is the Lenz House, built in about 1820. Read a little bit about it here. That page mentions the Harmonists, a group that tried and failed to build a utopian society here.

Sunset over the Lenz House

Here’s one photo I made with my iPhone 6s. We were walking back to the house we’d rented after dinner one night when a fellow invited us to a jam session. We were surprised that it involved mostly cellos and violins! A guitarist later joined.

Jam session with cellos

I shared these two photos in my post about the Roofless Church.

The Roofless Church
The Roofless Church

A double log cabin — two cabins sharing a conjoining covered deck — provides this view. It’s on the same property as the Lenz house.

Lenz house property

Finally, a lovely yellow flower.

Yellow bloom

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