All this week I’m sharing single-subject photo series I’ve made.

The very first series I made was of an office building in which I used to work. It was just like any other office building anywhere. But it was the one I walked into every day, and I often had an old camera with me, so I shot it frequently.

I was very happy working here until the big company bought us and ruined everything.

Sunrise across the anonymous office building

Palm Pre

Anonymous Office Building

Polaroid Big Swinger 3000, Fujifilm FP-3000B

Anonymous office building

Olympus Trip 500, Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400

Anonymous office building

Olympus Trip 500, Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400

Anonymous office building

Yashica Electro 35 GSN, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Pentax K1000, 50mm f/2 SMC Pentax-M, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building double exposure

Kodak Tourist, Kodak Plus-X

Anonymous office building

Minolta Hi-Matic 7, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Agfa Optima, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Kodak Pony 135, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Kodak Pony 135, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous Office Building

Canon AF35ML, Fujicolor 200

Double exposure

Argus A2B, Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros

Anonymous office building

Kodak Retina IIa, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Pentax ME, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax, Kodak T-Max 400

Anonymous office building

Kodak Brownie Starmatic, Kodak Portra 160

Anonymous office building

Olympus XA, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Minolta 110 Zoom SLR, Fujifilm Superia 200 (expired 12/2003)

Anonymous office building

Olympus Stylus Epic Zoom 80, Kodak T-Max 400

Anonymous office building

Nikon N65, 28-80 mm f/3.3-5.6 AF Nikkor, Fujicolor 200

Psychedelic anonymous office building

Argus Matchmatic C3, Fujicolor 200

Anonymous office building

Polaroid Automatic 250, Fujifilm FP3000-B

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Photography

Anonymous office building

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You know I love old gas stations. It’s always a pleasure when I find one.

I most commonly find them on old alignments of highways, but I suppose that’s because I frequent those kinds of roads. But many of them remain in cities and towns off the main roads, as well, such as this one on South Street in downtown Lafayette, Indiana.

Standard Oil

This is a “Red Crown” Standard Oil station, built in about 1927. Standard Oil built lots of these through the late 1920s and into the 1930s, mostly in the Midwest. Maybe a couple of dozen of them remain; this page shows several.

Standard Oil

While this one still operated as a Standard station, it was known as Jonesy’s. It closed during the 1980s and was threatened with demolition. The city library, which is next door, used it as a storage building for a time until local businessman Don Stein rescued it and got it restored. It is said that more than 40 layers of paint were removed from the inside walls to finally reveal the glazed brick. Also, the roof had fallen and was replaced with “new original stock” red tiles that Standard Oil remarkably still had in storage.

Standard Oil

The building was a petroliana museum for a while, but was later used as a stationary advertisement of sorts for the city of Lafayette. It’s not clear what the building’s use is now. As I researched this station, I found photos from not long ago that show details that are now missing, such as “Jonesey’s” lettering over the door, a “Standard Oil Products” sign over the plate window, and “WASHING” lettering over the left garage bay. At least the letters pictured above remain intact.

If you’d like to see some of the other vintage gas stations I’ve found, check out all of my posts tagged Gas Stations.

Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A, Fujicolor 200 (at EI 100)

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Film Photography, Road Trips

Standard Oil Red Crown station in Lafayette, Indiana

A circa 1927 gas station still stands, unused, in Lafayette, Indiana.

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Circle Tower entrance

Circle Tower entrance
Pentax ME, 50mm f/1.4 SMC Pentax-M
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

Circle Tower is my favorite building on Monument Circle in Indianapolis. This Art Deco beauty, completed in 1930, was designed by Indianapolis architectural firm Rubush & Hunter.

Last year a firm bought the building to convert the unoccupied offices to coworking space, complete with lightning-fast Internet and craft beer on tap.

I haven’t been inside this building in at least 25 years,  not since a restaurant called Del Frisco’s used to occupy one of the upper floors. It was a favorite place. On special occasions I’d drive all the way from Terre Haute, bringing friends along for a good meal.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: Circle Tower entrance

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On St. Clair St.

Forest land
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

“You look tired,” my boss said. “Listen, we can handle everything here. Take tomorrow off. Get a one-day head start on the weekend.”

was tired. We’d had a changing of the guard at work. The fellow who hired me, a company co-founder, had exited. His replacement had been on the job just a few weeks, and brought with her a whole host of process improvements that she aimed to implement rapidly. It’s been a lot of change in a short time, and it came while I’ve been mourning my father. I’d been pushing pretty hard.

I spent my free Friday alone. A buddy had sent me some expired, but always frozen, Agfa APX 100 film, so I loaded some into my Pentax ME. I started the day shooting my 50mm f/1.4 SMC Pentax-M lens but as my path too me downtown I found myself at Roberts Camera buying a nice used 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A lens.

I spent the rest of the day with it mounted to the ME. This was one of the first shots I made with that lens. Just look at how much life that lens and film rendered into those bricks!

I’m still tired, by the way. At least I am as I write this, near the end of March. But as this post publishes my family is back from a week’s vacation. Hopefully this post finds me refreshed. But I also need some blog breathing room. So all this week I’m publishing single frame posts from that day of photography.

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Film Photography

single frame: Forest land

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Cheveux

Cheveux
Yashica Electro 35 GSN
Kodak Tri-X 400
2018

I’ve been applying what I learned from Berenice Abbott’s New York photography (which I wrote about here). This shot shows it, a little: you can see some of Zionsville Village’s context even though I focused on this store’s entryway as my subject.

It’s great fun to try to recreate some of what I see in other photographers’ works, and then see what I think and feel about the results. What I think about this particular photo is that I didn’t get enough intersecting planes in it to add interest.

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Film Photography

single frame: Cheveux

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VDGN

VDGN
Canon EOS 630, 50mm f/1.8 Canon EF II
Eastman Double-X 5222
2018

Vardagen is a T-shirt and coffee shop in one of Fisher’s few remaining old buildings downtown. I go in there about once a week, for cold brew in the warm months and Cubans when it’s cold.

They like to stylize their name as VDGN. This is the back of their building and the building next to theirs.

Upcoming in Operation Thin the Herd, my Canon EOS 630. It’s an early example of Canon’s EOS series of SLRs.

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Film Photography

single frame: VDGN

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