Minton-Capehart Federal Building, Indianapolis

Brutalist pathway
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

I’m no fan of Brutalist architecture. It has the grace of Soviet design and the class of a punch in the mouth. But of late I’ve grudgingly admitted that it is worthy of preservation.

Indianapolis has a fabulous example of the form: the hulking Minton-Capehart Federal Building. It’s Downtown. You need no directions — just drive around and you’ll find it. You can’t miss it.

This pathway leads to the building’s entrances.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: Brutalist pathway

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Indiana War Memorial

To Vindicate the Principles
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

Indianapolis is second only to Washington, DC, in war memorials. Actually, while DC has more in number, we devote more land for ours. Take that, DC.

The Indiana War Memorial Plaza consumes five full blocks of prime Downtown space, between the federal courthouse on New York St. and the Indianapolis Public Library on St. Clair St.

If you’re ever in Indianapolis and want a good place to make some photographs, head on down to the Indiana War Memorial Plaza. If you’re there on a Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Sunday between 9 am and 5 pm, be sure to tour the museum inside the Indiana War Memorial itself.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: To Vindicate the Principles

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Circle Tower entrance

Circle Tower entrance
Pentax ME, 50mm f/1.4 SMC Pentax-M
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

Circle Tower is my favorite building on Monument Circle in Indianapolis. This Art Deco beauty, completed in 1930, was designed by Indianapolis architectural firm Rubush & Hunter.

Last year a firm bought the building to convert the unoccupied offices to coworking space, complete with lightning-fast Internet and craft beer on tap.

I haven’t been inside this building in at least 25 years,  not since a restaurant called Del Frisco’s used to occupy one of the upper floors. It was a favorite place. On special occasions I’d drive all the way from Terre Haute, bringing friends along for a good meal.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: Circle Tower entrance

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Minton-Capehart Federal Building, Indianapolis

Minton-Capehart Federal Building
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

I think it was Mike Connealy who wrote on his blog about being hassled by security when photographing a federal building where he lives. I mentioned that the next time I took a photo walk Downtown I ought to liberally photograph our federal building and see if I would be similarly accosted.

I did it recently, making five or six photos of this building while on the property, in probably a ten-minute span. I was left alone. Perhaps I just went unnoticed.

This photo from across the street benefits greatly from my 35mm lens. It was no trouble at all to fit this giant into my frame. I did have to tilt the camera up to avoid the top from being cut off, which created perspective error. A quick hit of Photoshop’s perspective-correction tool made the top of this building jut out properly.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: Minton-Capehart Federal Building

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On St. Clair St.

Forest land
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

“You look tired,” my boss said. “Listen, we can handle everything here. Take tomorrow off. Get a one-day head start on the weekend.”

was tired. We’d had a changing of the guard at work. The fellow who hired me, a company co-founder, had exited. His replacement had been on the job just a few weeks, and brought with her a whole host of process improvements that she aimed to implement rapidly. It’s been a lot of change in a short time, and it came while I’ve been mourning my father. I’d been pushing pretty hard.

I spent my free Friday alone. A buddy had sent me some expired, but always frozen, Agfa APX 100 film, so I loaded some into my Pentax ME. I started the day shooting my 50mm f/1.4 SMC Pentax-M lens but as my path too me downtown I found myself at Roberts Camera buying a nice used 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A lens.

I spent the rest of the day with it mounted to the ME. This was one of the first shots I made with that lens. Just look at how much life that lens and film rendered into those bricks!

I’m still tired, by the way. At least I am as I write this, near the end of March. But as this post publishes my family is back from a week’s vacation. Hopefully this post finds me refreshed. But I also need some blog breathing room. So all this week I’m publishing single frame posts from that day of photography.

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Film Photography

single frame: Forest land

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Cheveux

Cheveux
Yashica Electro 35 GSN
Kodak Tri-X 400
2018

I’ve been applying what I learned from Berenice Abbott’s New York photography (which I wrote about here). This shot shows it, a little: you can see some of Zionsville Village’s context even though I focused on this store’s entryway as my subject.

It’s great fun to try to recreate some of what I see in other photographers’ works, and then see what I think and feel about the results. What I think about this particular photo is that I didn’t get enough intersecting planes in it to add interest.

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Film Photography

single frame: Cheveux

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