At the chapel

At the chapel
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

Down the lane from Crown Hill Cemetery’s south entrance is a fine Gothic chapel. The grounds crew gives its beds great care.

Of all the images I made on this roll of Velvia, I think this one is the Velviest. Just look at all that lush color.

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Film Photography

single frame: At the chapel

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Lacy Building

The Lacy building
Argus Argoflex Forty
Kodak Ektar 100
2019

This is my second-favorite building on Monument Circle, the Lacy Building. Circle Tower with its Art Deco touches is my favorite, but for some reason I’ve photographed the Lacy Building more.

Last time I shared a photo of it, I was surprised and happy when an old college chum left a comment saying that the Lacy family are his relation, and their firm is still headquartered here.

When you’re in college, your buddies are just your buddies and you don’t think much about where they might come from. I didn’t, anyway.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: The Lacy building

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Jail

Boone Co. Jail
Argus Argoflex Forty
Kodak Verichrome Pan (expired 6/1980)
2019

Coming soon: a review of the circa-1950 Argus Argoflex Forty. It’s basically a box camera in twin-lens reflex guise, but it has a good, coated Anastigmat lens that’s sharp from corner to corner.

I had a great time with it and a roll of expired Verichrome Pan. I heard that this 620 camera can take 120 film if you snip the edges off the film spool and use a 620 takeup spool. I did that to a roll of Ektar, which is at the processor’s now. As soon as I get scans back I’ll finish writing my review of this camera and share it with you.

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Film Photography

single frame: Boone Co. Jail

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As the last of the Shakers left their central-Kentucky village — or died — in the early 1900s, their village fell into private hands and became known as Shakertown. Some buildings were given new uses, others were left to rot.

The same kind of determination and hard work the Shakers put into building their village went into restoring it. Some buildings were beyond saving, and some were already gone, but those that remain are a living look back into this religious sect and its way of life. Read a little bit about their history here.

Stone house
House
House
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Houses
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
House
House

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Preservation

The simple architecture of Shaker Village

A photo tour of Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill in central Kentucky, focusing on the many buildings that still stand there.

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Nestled amid the rolling hills of central Kentucky, 25 miles southwest of Lexington, you’ll find a village built and occupied by members of the Shaker religious sect from 1805 to 1910. Many of the buildings they built still stand, most of them in restored condition. It’s a remarkable collection of structures, suggesting a large and vibrant community. Here are many of the doors from Shaker Village. It’s a tourist destination today; where you see Open signs on the doors, it means visitors are invited in to wander and explore.

Doors
Door
Doors
Door
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
View
Door
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
Door
The Trustee's House

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Preservation

Thursday doors: Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill

On this Thursday, the doors of Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, Kentucky.

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Courthouse

The Birch Bayh Federal Building and United States Courthouse
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Film Washi S
2019

I’m at best a beginning student in photography appreciation, with limited ability to describe the qualities of a good photograph. For that matter, I’m not even sure I can judge a photograph to be good, not on some universal scale. I just like what I like.

I like this photograph. The 35mm lens brings in tons of interesting context surrounding this neoclassical federal courthouse. The glowing sunlight cast against the building’s facade contrasts pleasingly against its shadowy flank.

It’s said that Film Washi S performs best in diffuse light. For a day of black-and-white photography in full sun, I should have been better served shooting something like T-Max 100 or FP4 Plus. But I would have missed out on the chiaroscuro effect, though unintended, obtained in shooting this film in non-ideal light.

Analogue Wonderland provided me this roll of Film Washi S in exchange for this mention. Buy yours from them here.

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Film Photography

single frame: The Birch Bayh Federal Building and United States Courthouse

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