Film Photography

Cold days, suburban neighborhood, expired Agfa APX 100

Royal Run clubhouse

I don’t know why I thought an ISO 100 film made sense during the gray days of an Indiana winter. I need to tattoo it on my film-loading hand: fast film in poor light, you kook!

Rural scene

But I liked the results I got on original-emulsion Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998) so much the last time that when I came upon another roll in my film fridge I let impulse rule.

Snow-tipped bush

It had been an age since I shot my Nikon F2AS. A 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor lens was already attached so I just went with it. It was good to catch up with my old friend, even if I was relegated to slow shutter speeds and wide apertures and the resulting need to stand stock still or brace myself against fixed objects to avoid camera shake.

Snowy pine

I shot these images just before Christmas, during the loose-ends phase of my recent unemployment. I took a lot of walks on the two-mile main-road loop of our neighborhood. It was something to do and it burned the extra calories I was taking in thanks to always being near my refrigerator.

Pine on the walking path

Much of December was white around the edges, but a warm spell the week before Christmas erased all that.

In the subdivision

The bare trees are the only clue to these photos’ time of year. But even they can’t narrow it down all the way.

In the subdivision

I’m getting to the point in my photography where I almost don’t care what my subject is, as long as I can arrange an interesting composition or capture interesting light. That’s a good thing, because this vinyl village subdivision I live in is anything but interesting.

In the subdivision

On one walk I got a little direct sun. APX 100 goes all silvery in direct sun — it’s this film’s endearing charm. The soil in this flowerbed reminds me of those old TV commercials for Folger’s Crystals, all sparkling and rich.

In the subdivision

One more from before the snow melted. This road near our subdivision is an old alignment of a decommissioned state highway. It dead ends just behind me.

Side street

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Carmel Arts and Design District

Carmel Arts and Design District
Nikon F2, 50mm f/2 AI Nikkor
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

I don’t remember downtown Carmel, Indiana, before it was built up. I guess it wasn’t much, just a handful of old buildings. I don’t know; I never spent any time here.

Which, I suppose, is why the city built up its downtown. It’s now full of restaurants, shops, and galleries. My wife and I come here from our Zionsville home several times a year, sometimes just to have a pint of Guinness at Muldoon’s, but just as often to attend one of the many events here. They have an annual car show I really like.

Calling it the “Arts and Design District” feels like a ridiculous affectation, a name affixed in hopes it would one day come true. But as small-city downtowns go, it’s pretty nice.

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Film Photography

single frame: Carmel Arts and Design District

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Indiana War Memorial

To Vindicate the Principles
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

Indianapolis is second only to Washington, DC, in war memorials. Actually, while DC has more in number, we devote more land for ours. Take that, DC.

The Indiana War Memorial Plaza consumes five full blocks of prime Downtown space, between the federal courthouse on New York St. and the Indianapolis Public Library on St. Clair St.

If you’re ever in Indianapolis and want a good place to make some photographs, head on down to the Indiana War Memorial Plaza. If you’re there on a Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Sunday between 9 am and 5 pm, be sure to tour the museum inside the Indiana War Memorial itself.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: To Vindicate the Principles

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Circle Tower entrance

Circle Tower entrance
Pentax ME, 50mm f/1.4 SMC Pentax-M
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

Circle Tower is my favorite building on Monument Circle in Indianapolis. This Art Deco beauty, completed in 1930, was designed by Indianapolis architectural firm Rubush & Hunter.

Last year a firm bought the building to convert the unoccupied offices to coworking space, complete with lightning-fast Internet and craft beer on tap.

I haven’t been inside this building in at least 25 years,  not since a restaurant called Del Frisco’s used to occupy one of the upper floors. It was a favorite place. On special occasions I’d drive all the way from Terre Haute, bringing friends along for a good meal.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: Circle Tower entrance

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Minton-Capehart Federal Building, Indianapolis

Minton-Capehart Federal Building
Pentax ME, 35mm f/2.8 SMC Pentax-A
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

I think it was Mike Connealy who wrote on his blog about being hassled by security when photographing a federal building where he lives. I mentioned that the next time I took a photo walk Downtown I ought to liberally photograph our federal building and see if I would be similarly accosted.

I did it recently, making five or six photos of this building while on the property, in probably a ten-minute span. I was left alone. Perhaps I just went unnoticed.

This photo from across the street benefits greatly from my 35mm lens. It was no trouble at all to fit this giant into my frame. I did have to tilt the camera up to avoid the top from being cut off, which created perspective error. A quick hit of Photoshop’s perspective-correction tool made the top of this building jut out properly.

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Film Photography, Preservation

single frame: Minton-Capehart Federal Building

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Coffee out

Cup and carafe
Pentax ME, 50mm f/1.4 SMC Pentax-M
Agfa APX 100 (expired 7/1998)
2018

Breakfast is my favorite meal of the day, and I love to take it in a restaurant.

When I was in my early 20s I sometimes stopped at a cheerful little cafe downtown on my way to work. It was on 6th St.; I think it was called Boo’s. I always sat at the counter, leaving the few tables to parties of more than one.

Frequently the sheriff ate his breakfast next to me. Such is life in a town the size of Terre Haute. It was his habit to sit at the second stool from the end, and I soon learned to leave it vacant for him. We never spoke, but we always greeted each other by turning our heads toward each other and tilting them back a little.

My eggs, bacon, toast, and coffee set me back only about $3.50, as I recall. Adjusted for inflation, that’s not much more than $6 today. Since moving to Indianapolis I’ve always wished to find a place where I can buy breakfast so inexpensively. The day I drank this carafe of coffee, in a cafe up in Carmel, it and my little egg frittata set me back $13.

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Film Photography

single frame: Cup and carafe

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