Film Photography

The back streets of Zionsville

I’m smitten with the great color and sharpness my Yashica Lynx 14e delivered on Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400 the day I walked around Zionsville.

Yellow box truck

It was a rare sunny day this extra-gray winter. After a heavy snow event the temperatures rose to near 50 degrees and so the streets were full of puddles.

Garage

I photograph Zionsville a lot now that I live here, usually the charming Main Street. This day I walked along some of Zionsville’s back streets and alleys looking for interesting compositions.

Garage and alley

The town was chartered in 1852 and many buildings and homes from the last half of the 19th century remain. Some of them have been repurposed, like this little church that is now someone’s home.

Parked

This green house at the north end of Main Street is probably my favorite in town, and I’ve photographed it over and over. Zillow says it was built in 1918, and has 3 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms.

Green house

Zillow also says that this house is worth about a half million dollars. That’s a huge amount of money for a house in Indiana. The same house in Indianapolis would go for far, far less. “The Village” in Zionsville can command these prices because it’s such a charming place to live. Margaret and I would love to move to the Village, but unless we luck into an incredible deal its home prices put it out of our reach.

To get Down the Road in your inbox or reader, click here to subscribe!

Advertisements
Standard
Camera Reviews

I’ve owned two Minolta Maxxum 7000 bodies and both suffered from the same fatal flaw: a failed aperture-control magnet that made the camera operate only at the mounted lens’s smallest aperture.

It’s a shame, really, because this camera is otherwise a pleasure to use, and the common lenses are quite capable.

I’ve updated my review of this camera; read it here.

Minolta Maxxum 7000

Updated review: Minolta Maxxum 7000

Aside
Red umbrellas

Red umbrellas at the Brick Street Inn
Yashica Lynx 14e
Fujifilm Superia X-tra 400
2019

This isn’t one of my finest compositions, but I love how the Yashica Lynx 14e captured the light and detail of this scene. Also, the reds and blacks here are so good you’d think this was Kodak Ektar, not Fuji 400.

Get my photography in your inbox or reader! Click here to subscribe.

Film Photography

single frame: Red umbrellas at the Brick Street Inn

.

Image
Camera Reviews

I’ve extensively updated my review of a classic twin-lens-reflex camera, the Yashica-12.

This wonderful box offers a pair of 80mm Yashinon lenses that do great work. Although this camera is heavy and a little unwieldy to carry, its controls all work with jeweled precision and are a delight. Read my updated review here.

Yashica-12

Updated review: Yashica-12

Aside
Personal

I suppose having my midlife crisis in startup software companies was better than buying a sports car or dating younger women

I’d been a first-level manager in the software industry for 15 years, leading testers and technical writers, when I was passed over for a promotion to Director. It pissed me off. I was a good manager who had accomplished a lot for that company, and I was ready to stretch into the next level. I thought I deserved the chance. I don’t think it’s just my ego talking when I say I would have done a better job than the man they brought in and for whom I had to work.

Then I got a call from a startup software company: was I interested in being a Director for them?

Why yes. Yes I was!

I don’t know where my ambition came from, as I’d had little of it before then. Since I was a teen I had wanted only to work in the software industry. For a long time I was perfectly happy writing technical documentation and testing software to make sure it worked as intended. I didn’t seek to move up the ladder; my first management job fell into my lap.

Office
I’ve had a lot of desks in my career, but only twice a private office.

Yet through my early 40s I felt pangs of discontent. I could see ways to do things better, but as a manager I lacked the authority to do much about it. I itched to have more clout and make a bigger impact. Also, as my kids were headed toward their college years, the extra money of the Director level appealed to me.

I got the job and dived belly first into boiling water. What a mess things were there. Not only did I build their test team from scratch, but I also turned around their broken software delivery system. I wasn’t able to fix the company’s fatal flaw, however: the product was a hard sell, and we kept widely missing our sales goals. We rolled and pitched as upper leadership had us build this and then that into the software hoping something would catch on in the marketplace. Nothing ever did, not enough to make a dent in the market, not enough to satisfy investors. Sales became frightfully poor for six months and it became clear they’d have to cut staff. They showed me the door.

I moved on surprisingly quickly to another young company, beyond its startup stage but not yet mature. I built a couple functions from the ground up as a Director there — another testing team, and a program management team. It was great fun and I liked it there a lot.

Yet I’d started dreaming of being a Director of Engineering. Testing had become old hat for me, and because of changes in the industry opportunities were drying up. But also, I knew that quality starts at the top — you have to build it in. To deliver software as well as I knew it could be done, I’d have to do it by leading the software developers.

My chance came two years ago. An executive I knew and admired wanted me to lead engineering at his startup. I jumped at the chance.

Office
The view from the Director of Engineering’s desk.

I proved there what I wanted to prove all along: that building a product well from the start is better and faster all around. Our product had few bugs, it held up under load, and it scaled with the business.

But after we built the core product, there were internal disagreements about what to build next. It undermined everything. The executive who hired me had ideas, but he didn’t win over the rest of the execs and in the end he resigned. The person they brought in to replace him treated me badly, and as you know if you’ve been reading this blog for the last six months she fired me with neither explanation nor warning.

I had proved to myself that I could do all the things I wanted to do — but so what? It didn’t save these companies, it didn’t give me the feelings of accomplishment I wanted, and it sure as hell didn’t bring me the respect and admiration I was secretly looking for. Instead, I wound up on the street.

The job I was able to get before my family’s finances got rough is as a first-level manager. It stings a lot to have been essentially demoted.

At least I’m still in engineering. Also, I’m a deeply experienced first-level manager; this is a job I can do well. Even better, I’m in an organization that, while not perfect, functions reasonably well. As in all companies there are business challenges, but there are agreed-upon plans to work through them. If you’ve ever worked for me, you’ve heard me say it: even a mediocre plan will work if everybody follows it. Also, because the company is mature it pays market rate, something startups don’t do. I make the same money I did before as Director of Engineering.

I’m dancing on a fine line. To accept where I am feels like giving up on my dream. Even though I found out my dream isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, a part of me wants to double down on it to prove it was good all along. Maybe I should get a new dream. Or maybe I should stop dreaming and be content with what I have, because it is objectively good.

Standard
Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Is it spring yet?

💻 Dr. Alfred Prunesquallor, an MD who does long stints treating patients in Africa, came upon two leopards recently and has the photos to prove it. Read Mother and daughter

Abandoned US 36
Kodak EasyShare Z730, 2007.

💻 Carl Fisher was not only an early developer of highways, but also of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. I’ve written here about Fisher’s highways, the Dixie Highway and the Lincoln Highway, many times. Richard Simpson tells Fisher’s story in brief. Read Carl Graham Fisher

📷 Many film photographers have been apoplectic over Fujifilm’s announced price hike on their films. EM at EMULSIVE wrote a startlingly good analysis this week of why Fujifilm’s behavior is actually smart business, and how we should all get over ourselves. Read Fujifilm: put down your pitchforks, it’s survival of the fittest

📷 Almost all twin-lens reflex cameras take medium-format film — except for the Agfa Flexilette, which takes 35mm film. It’s a strange little machine. Thomas Merk reviews one for 35mmc. Read When a Silette Meets a Rolleiflex: the Agfa Flexilette, a 35mm TLR

Standard