Speeding

Speeding
iPhone 6s
2017

One of the cool features of my Toyota Matrix is how its gauges are invisible until you turn the car on. I think the display looks especially cool at night.

Astute readers may be curious as to why my car’s redline is so high, 7,800 RPM. It’s a feature of Toyota’s 2ZZ-GE four-cylinder engine, which was designed by Yamaha and built in Japan. It’s the go-fast engine in Toyota’s ZZ engine family. You’ll find versions of this engine in several Toyotas and, surprisingly, one Pontiac and two Lotuses.

Revving the engine past 6,200 RPM activates a second camshaft profile that boosts speed suddenly and considerably. It feels like turbo and is great fun. Unfortunately, my Matrix is hobbled with an automatic transmission, making it hard to reach the revs necessary to have this fun. If you ever buy a 2ZZ-GE-equipped Matrix (it will have the XRS badge on the hatch), go for the six-speed manual transmission.

I’m still talking about this car in the present tense because I haven’t disposed of it yet. It still has the front-end problems that aren’t worth fixing given the car’s market value. It’s days remain numbered. But with everything else going on I haven’t found time to deal with getting rid of it yet.

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Photography

single frame: Speeding

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Looking up

Looking up
Canon PowerShot S95
2011

I still make time most mornings for coffee, breakfast, and blogging. But I haven’t had much to say. And now I’m running out of new photographs to share. I’m just overbusy with non-blog-related things.

So here’s a photo from 2011, when I was still getting to know my Canon PowerShot S95. This is an apartment building Downtown, not far from popular Massachusetts Avenue.

 

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single frame: Looking up

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Bike Xing

Bike xing
Canon PowerShot S95
2011

My Canon PowerShot S95 was a gift at Christmas in 2010. I can’t believe it just keeps working. Aren’t digital cameras supposed to be fragile, and fail after just a few years of use?

I’ve certainly used mine heavily. I’ve probably made 10,000 photographs with it.

I was still learning this camera’s ropes when a few co-workers and I took a photo walk Downtown. The city had just installed these bike-path markers in the pavement.

 

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single frame: Bike xing

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Photography

I know I took that photo, but I can’t find it!

The other day I needed to find this photograph I took of the last Studebaker ever produced, a 1966 Cruiser.

From the beginning I’ve stored my photos on my hard drive in dated folders grouped by year. When I remember about when I took a photo, I can find it fast. I knew I visited the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend several months before my parents moved away from that city. I remembered well that they moved away in August of 2014. So I had to look only through my 2014 and 2013 folders to find the subfolder with this photograph.

But that’s no longer my norm. I’ve made tens of thousands of photographs since beginning this photography hobby more than a decade ago. I frequently can’t remember when I took a particular photo.

I know, I know, I should have been using some sort of cataloging software all along. But having never stuck with any hobby for this long, I never saw this problem coming. I did try Lightroom for a while last year for its cataloging and tagging system, but I found its user interface to be so byzantine that I gave up on it in frustration. And it would be an enormous project to tag every photo I ever made.

Hoch lebe Deutschland!

Fortunately, I’ve uploaded a lot of my photographs to Flickr, which has some AI that guesses what’s in each photograph and tags them accordingly. And I wrote quick descriptions on most photos when I uploaded them. So when I wrote that recent post about my poor Toyota Matrix’s last days, a quick Flickr search for “Matrix” returned more photos than I could use.

But for every photo that I’ve uploaded to Flickr there is at least one more that I haven’t. The dozens of photos I shot on that 2013 visit to the Studebaker National Museum are among them. But it’s unusual now that I can remember when I took a particular photograph.

So I ask you: what is your solution? How have you categorized, organized, tagged, or indexed your photographs so you can find one when you need it?

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Carmel Artomobilia 2017

Camaro SS
Pentax ME, 50mm f/2 SMC Pentax-M
Fujifilm Superia 100
2017

I’m kind of over Chevy Camaros. They’re one of the most common cars at shows, and most of them have been up-restored, if you will, from lower-trim models into fire-breathing high-performance models.

I’d love, just once, to see a plain-Jane six-cylinder early Camaro at a show. Vinyl seats and two-speed Powerglide automatic transmission. The kind we used to call “secretary specials” when that wasn’t considered un-PC.

But the big red stripes on this one were photogenic, so I shot it anyway.

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single frame: Camaro SS

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Photography

Fujifilm Superia 100 and the Carmel Artomobilia

I love to photograph old cars. When the city of Carmel, Indiana, closed its downtown streets late last month for a car show, I took Margaret and we brought our cameras.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

The Carmel Artomobilia is an annual event and this was its 10th year, but it was my first visit. I assumed for a long time that the show would mostly be newer exotic cars, and those don’t jazz me very much. But I was assured that the show is a good mix of all kinds of interesting cars. So off we went to see.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

I put my last roll of Fujifilm Superia 100 into my Pentax ME, and mounted my 50mm f/2 SMC Pentax-M lens. I prefer this lens to my 50/1.4 in everyday shooting as it gives extra depth and warmth to colors. It made the Fuji 100 really sing.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

It’s not often I get a roll back from the processor and feel my pleasure deepen with each frame I examine. But that’s just what happened with this roll. I am comfortable and confident with old cars as subjects, I was using my favorite camera, and I chose a lens and film that render color well. It was a recipe for success.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

The Fuji 100 really loves green. It might be the color negative film I’ve used that renders green best.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

The film returned deeply saturated reds similar to what I experience with Kodak Ektar 100. It’s too bad that Fujifilm discontinued this film. I like it as much as Ektar, and it was less expensive. That flare from something reflective out of the frame is a little bit of a bummer in an otherwise satisfying photograph.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

All sorts of cars were present. I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a Morris Minor in person before. I love it when I get to “meet” a car in this way.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

Plenty of classic American iron was on display, of course. I’m partial to 1960s Mopar muscle. I just adore the crisp and purposeful designs of Elwood Engel, Chrysler’s chief designer during this era.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

What’s this? One Ferrari photo? The contrast between the sensuous hood line and that crisp wheel arch was too strong to ignore.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

I’m old enough to remember when first-generation VW Buses were common hippie-mobiles, clapped out and covered in hand-painted flowers. I’m not old enough, however, to remember them as new. This one was beautifully restored.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

I made so many close shots because, with a 50mm lens, I needed to back way up to get more of each car in the frame. Especially at first, the event was so crowded that when I backed up my viewfinder would quickly be filled with people — usually from shoulder to knee, given where I was composing. Fortunately, I like to make close shots of old cars.

I did get a few photos from a distance. Here’s one of Margaret shooting a Buick. She’s not remotely the car fan I am, and I’m fortunate that she’s so easygoing and will share with me pretty much any experience I ask of her.

Carmel Artomobilia 2017

I also shot my last roll of Kodak Plus-X in my Spotmatic F at this show. I’ll share those photos in an upcoming post.

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