Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Here now, this week’s best blog posts.

Heide has a pretty good idea: when world events get you down, retreat into past trip photos. Ah, there, that’s better. Read Running away to Arles

Are you a film photographer who travels? You could write for World on Film, Stephen Dowling‘s new site. I contributed a story about Route 66 for the site’s debut; read it here. If you want to contribute, check the guidelines. Read Write for World on Film

Abdul Hakim-Shabazz is a lawyer and a reporter here in Indiana who covered Vice President Pence while he was Governor. A selfie he took with Pence at a recent event generated considerable online vitriol, to which Hakim-Shabazz says: cut it out. You don’t have to like any politician or his policies, but stop with the demonization already. Read Politics & Politeness

Here are this week’s film camera reviews and experience reports.

Advertisements
Standard
Blogosphere

Recommended reading

On the Saturday that is the anniversary of my birth, a digest of blog posts from the week now ending.

Stephen Dowling of Kosmo Foto has started a new site, World on Film, to highlight world travel photographed on film. I contributed to its debut this week. Read Route 66 on a Kodak Brownie Hawkeye

A French town, a once-bombed church, and a visit to New Orleans, all leading to a connection to the destruction of Hiroshima in 1945. If you think all things are not connected, you will question that belief after reading Heide‘s post. Read One man’s journey to Hiroshima

I was born after all the TV networks started broadcasting everything in color, but not before there were enough color shows that the syndicated reruns didn’t still need to be in black and white Ken Levine remembers the “wow!” factor of a show converting to color in the 1960s. Read Oh wow, it’s in COLOR!

Here are this week’s camera reviews and experience reports.

Standard
Blogosphere

Recommended reading

How could it possibly be August already?!!? Here are the best blog posts I read as we transitioned into the month of dog days.

Seth Godin encourages us, whatever side we are on, to acknowledge when we are wrong. Because every side is sometimes wrong. Read My side, right or wrong

I’m deeply attached to my home, which went on the market yesterday. After I sell it, I will not want to drive through this neighborhood again, perhaps for many years, because it will break my heart if the next owner doesn’t care for it properly. So I totally get Jennifer Bowman‘s attachment to a few homes of her life. She about the homes that meant the most to her and why it’s hard for her, too, to drive by them now. Read Home(s)

I’ve been fascinated with gas-station architecture for years. It’s interesting to see how the changing auto culture led to changes in what gas stations looked like! Writing for Curbside Classic, Ex Eugeniac (a pseudonym) shows how stations evolved in Los Angeles. Read Service Station Classics: The Innovative Auto Salons of Early Los Angeles

Josh Solomon reviews Kodak Double-X 5222, a 35mm cinema film that you can shoot in a still camera. I’ve shot it and liked it, and so did Josh — but he gives a good report of its limitations. Read Eastman Kodak Double-X (5222), A Cinematic Black and White Film

Film-camera reviews and experience reports:

Standard
Blogosphere

Recommended reading

You know the drill: good blog posts from around the Net all this week. Enjoy.

I’m not a big fan of goals. I like direction instead: which way am I going? Because goals are a focus, but direction lets me enjoy the journey. Nathan Kontny, writing for Signal v. Noise, tells a story from his life that illustrates this. Read Not meeting your goals

Several years ago I shared with you my visit to an S bridge on the National Road in Pennsylvania. (See it here.) Adam Prince shares historic photos of it, including from when the current alignment of US 40 was built. Read The National Road – Pennsylvania – Claysville ‘S’ Bridge

If you were a child at any time in the last 60 years, you’ve heard her voice. June Foray, who voiced Rocket J. Squirrel, Granny (to Tweety and Sylvester), Jokey Smurf, and even Cindy Lou Who, has died, aged 99. She worked nearly to the end. Mark Evanier worked with her many times and remembers both the woman and her storied eight-decade career. Read June Foray, R.I.P.

Here’s June Foray herself talking about my favorite of her roles, Rocky:

Film-camera reviews and experience reports:

Standard
Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Saturday morning again, Roadies, and time for my weekly blog roundup.

Susie Trexler shares the story and some lovely photographs of a mission-revival school building she found in Reno, NV. It’s just luscious. Read Reno’s Mission Revival Quartet of Schools

If you’re like me, you cameras stuffed into every nook and cranny of your house. James Tocchio did too, and finally cried uncle. Here’s what he did to change his gear acquisition syndrome. Read Why I Got Rid of My Camera Collection And Why You Should Too — Maybe

Here’s one for my fellow car fans. Paul Niedermeyer, writing for Curbside Classic, found a 1951 Hudson someone’s still driving. These were such futuristic cars for their time, and Paul tells the story of their streamlined, aerodynamic design against the context of their time, and how they predicted modern car design. Read Curbside Classic: 1951 Hudson Pacemaker

Jess Cotton, writing for The Book of Life, considers the incalculable value of being unhappy as teenagers. Read The Importance of Being Unhappy Teenagers

Here are the vintage camera reviews and experience reports I found this week.

Like this post? Share it on social media with the buttons below! And subscribe to get more in your inbox or reader six days a week.    Click here to subscribe!
Standard
Blogosphere

Recommended reading

On Saturday this blog pauses to consider good posts other bloggers wrote in the last seven days.

Nicholas Middleton put the new Ferrania P30 Alpha black-and-white film through extensive exposure and processing tests. Read Ferrania P30 Alpha

The fabulous Berlin Typography blog considers the letterforms at the various stops of the U7 subway line, which at the time it was completed was the longest in the city. Extensive photography shows some intricate tile work at some of the stops. Read The Many Faces of the U7

Aaron Renn considers the decline of the classic American diner, and what it says about the fragmenting and segmenting of American culture. Read Diners and the Decline of Shared Social Institutions

I see so many rabbits in my neighborhood this year! More than ever. I see them at all hours of the day, but Jennifer Bowman notices how where she lives they are out only for a particular 90-minute period every day. Read Bunny Hour

I love radio stories. Ken Levine tells one with a moral, and it applies to those of us who create content online: do it for your readers, not for yourself or your cohort. Read A show I once loved that didn’t hold up

Jim Cavanaugh has always had to buy health insurance privately. He tells how bad things got before Obamacare, how things got a lot better at first on Obamacare, but how things are about as bad now as before Obamacare. Read Health Insurance: A Report From The Trenches

Here are this week’s film-camera reviews and experience reports:

Standard