Blogosphere

Recommended reading

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(That intro is an inside joke for all the C programmers in my audience.)

Labor is expensive. At least it is in the United States. Writing for Marginal RevolutionAlex Tabarrok illustrates from a recent visit to India what happens when labor is cheap. Read When Labor is Cheap

Matt Mullenweg, who by the way is in charge of the company that makes WordPress.com, writes about songs that remind him of his deceased father. It’s a touching read. Read Songs for My Father

Populism’s rise might appear to be a response to a rising super-rich elite. But Aaron Renn, writing for City Journal, suggests that the average American’s drive to get everything as cheaply as possible contributes heavily as well. Read America the Cheap

Mr. Money Mustache thinks life is less stressful to be in a position to absorb some loss than to rely on contracts and guarantees. Read There Are No Guarantees

What’s the world’s favorite film camera? Stephen Dowling wants to know, and he’s finding out by asking film photographers. If you want to participate, click through. Read What’s the world’s favourite film camera?

I wasn’t planning on plugging my book today, but then Denny Gibson was kind enough to review it on his blog this week. The verdict? It’s not crappy. High praise! Read Book Review: Exceptional Ordinary by Jim Grey

If you like non-crappy photography books, do click the cover below to buy a copy. $15.99 + $3.99 shipping for softcover, $8.49 for immediate PDF download.

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

I love CBS News Sunday Morning. If I weren’t in church when it is on, I’d never miss it. I hope you look forward to Saturday’s recommended reading in similar fashion!

Jason Fried writes for Signal v. Noise about the number zero, and how it’s liberating when you are blogging or Instagramming or doing anything online that has stats associated with it. Read The Intimidating Zero

A tech CEO recently pleaded no contest to beating his wife. Penelope Trunk thinly knits together some research and experience to draw some blunt conclusions around tech execs and their propensity to abuse their spouses. I don’t think her logic fully supports her assertions but you can’t deny that what she wrote is interesting and thought provoking. Read Silicon Valley CEO pleads no contest to beating his wife

Pentax has made many great cameras in its history. Alex Luyckx considers several (including the Pentax ME, which you know I love) on his podcast — but also shares photos of and from them in an associated blog post. What a clever way to support a podcast with visuals. Read Classic Camera Revival – Episode 28 – The K Team

Meanwhile, Mike Connealy writes a nice review of my book, Exceptional Ordinary: Everyday Photography with the Pentax ME. Thanks, Mike! Read Exceptional Ordinary

All of this it gives me a good chance to plug said book. You know you want one! Click the cover below to buy a copy.

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

It’s Saturday again. You know the drill. 

But first let me hawk once again my new book, Exceptional Ordinary: Everyday Photography with the Pentax ME. If you enjoy my photography on this blog you will especially enjoy it in my book! Click the cover below to order your copy.

Now this week’s best blog posts:

The Fuji Instax instant-photo system is hot in some circles, but I haven’t felt much attraction to it. But Johnny Martyr found the perfect use: photographing his daughter at Disney with the princesses that roam the park. Read Photographing Disney with the Fuji Instax Mini 8

It’s a camera that looks like a pocket watch — and it was made 112 years ago. James Tocchio gives us a detailed look at it and tells its history. Read 1905 Ticka Watch Camera – An In-Depth Look

Craft beers are increasingly being gobbled up by Big Beer. At the same time, Big Beer is moving to control the distribution channels. If you like beer, you’ll want to read Nick Gerlich‘s report. Read Pour Another Round

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Happy Saturday, Roadies, and enjoy this roundup of good blog posts from around the Net this week.

Matt Lambros takes wonderful photographs of decrepit old theaters. This week he shared photos from inside the Pantheon Theatre in Vincennes, a very old town in southwest Indiana. Below: my photo of its exterior from my US 50 tour several years ago. Read Pantheon Theatre — Vincennes, Indiana

Pantheon Theatre

It’s been a rough time for bricks-and-mortar retail as chain after chain shutters stores. The latest, Payless Shoe Source, got Nick Gerlich to thinking that this year might mark the end of traditional retail as we knew it. Read Broken Record

Dilbert creator Scott Adams writes a smart blog. The post I’m sharing is actually about something not truly related to why I found it interesting: he points out slant among the major news organizations being a matter of what they cover and how, and calls it a form of manipulation. Is anybody else saying this? If so I haven’t encountered it. Read How a Hypnotist Sees a Verbal Slip

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

No fooling, here’s my weekly roundup of blog posts I enjoyed.

Can you imagine a Ford with diamond-tufted leather and real wood inlay? You can buy a Fusion so equipped. And it’s not just chintz tacked on. It feels as nice as a Lincoln. That’s because the old automotive brand hierarchies are dead, says Tom Halter, writing for Curbside Classic. Read Future CC: 2017 Ford Fusion Platinum – The End of Luxury

Roy Karlsvik posted a couple terrific photographs of blacksmiths doing their work. Read A couple more from the smithy

In South Bend, Indiana, the Studebaker family built an ornate church on the west side of town. Jacob Titus explored some of its hidden areas, and shares some photographs. It’s urbex, except with permission! Also: this is the church where my parents got married! Read Instagram Meetup – St. Paul’s Memorial UMC

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Would the universe implode if I stopped sharing my Saturday morning blog-post roundup? Certainly not, but a man can dream of doing something so vital.

Katherine Griffiths shares a photo-booth strip from her collection of two young women. In the booth’s privacy, they shed the facades we all carry in the world, and were fully themselves as they enjoyed their friendship. You can see it on their faces. Read Gorgeous Giggling Girls

Reality is messy and non-linear. Yet we need a way to tell about our lives in ways that make sense. So we all reframe our pasts into stories. It’s how we make sense of our world. Writing for The Book of Life, Jess Cotton encourages us to find a tender and noble story to tell about ourselves, and assures us such a story is there for even you. Read How to Narrate Your Life Story

I’m generally for free markets, but Seth Godin makes a great point about unbridled capitalism: it can quickly become a race to the bottom focused on short-term gains. He uses the first advertisement for Coca-Cola to illustrate. Read The reason we need the FDA (hint: it’s marketers)

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