Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Spring is here, ah, spring is here! Life is skittles and life is beer! It doesn’t hurt that it’s Saturday and time for my weekly roundup of good blog posts.

πŸ’» There are three basic approaches to life, says N. S. Palmer. I’m really good at the first way, but I’d like to move more to the second and third ways because they seem a lot less crabby. Read Three Ways to Live

march of the mechanical men
Canon PowerShot S95, 2019.

πŸ’» If you follow the news at all, you know a trade war is heating up between the US and China. Ray Dalio, writing for LinkedIn, explains how American and Chinese culture are driving the behavior of these two large powers. Read The Ideological War of Comparable Powers in a Small World

πŸ’» There are two ghost towns at the Indiana Dunes of Lake Michigan: City West and Baileytown. Challenger Tom visits them with his camera. Read Ghost Town Tuesday: The Ghost Towns of Indiana Dunes National Park and State Park

πŸ“· Kurt Munger reviews the Hedren Weekender, the 110 camera that’s also a flashlight, an alarm clock, and a radio. Seriously. And it takes pretty good pictures. Read Hedren Weekender Review

πŸ“· Ming Thein uses super-high-end gear all the time. But when he tried Nikon’s new entry-level D3500 DSLR, which you can buy anywhere with a lens for just $400, he found it to be a capable performer — all the camera most people need, and almost all the camera even the pros need. Read In praise of crappy hardware

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Welcome to Saturday, Roadies, and to my usual roundup of the best blog posts from around the Internet this week.

πŸ’» When has a place changed so much that it’s no longer the same place? T. C. Scheidler meditates on this as he considers both a log cabin that was once the Wayne County, Indiana, courthouse, and a childhood home in Elkhart County, Indiana. Read Wayne County – Salisbury (1811-1812)

First Wayne County courthouse
My 2009 photo of the Salisbury courthouse in T. C. Scheidler’s post. Kodak Z730 Zoom.

πŸ’» Longtime blogger Mark Evanier normally blogs about entertainment, but he also occasionally blogs about the feral cats he feeds. One of them, Lydia, is a frequent subject and this week he told her story. Read The Kitten Khronicles

πŸ’» J. P. Cavanaugh shares a song about lard. Really. Read Manteca – Jalapeno Bebop

πŸ’» Dashing off a tweet, or a Facebook update, or even a quick blog post may not seem daunting — but writing an entire book sure is. Seth Godin offers a good mind shift to help you with the big projects. Read Time travel is exhausting

πŸ“· I’ve so far avoided cameras from the former Soviet bloc, but I do read reviews of them with great curiosity. Mark O’Brien reviews possibly the most austere Soviet 35mm SLR of them all, the Zenit 12XE. Read Comrade, Can I Interest You In A Zenit?

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You know the drill.

πŸ’» I love a good classic dystopian novel and have read many of them. I sometimes think about how they’re coming true. So does Eric Lawler, who compares modern times to Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451. Read Warnings from the past

πŸ“· Johnny Martyr has some terrific advice, some technical and some practical, for making great candids at wedding receptions. A real insider view from a pro wedding photographer. Read Wedding Receptions on Film: No Flash, No Automation

Talbott Inn
Nikon FA, 35-70mm Zoom Nikkor, Agfa Vista 200, 2019.

πŸ’» If you like Indiana’s National Road like I do, you’ll enjoy Richard Simpson‘s research on the 1940 alignment of US 40 between Dunreith and Knightstown. I’ve photographed the old alignment here. Simpson explains that it was built to eliminate a dangerous railroad crossing — and involved moving a river. Read US 40 at Knightstown

πŸ“· Peggy Anne raves about her plastic, not-made-by-Nikon Nikon FM10. Read Nikon FM10

πŸ“· So many camera reviews are written after a roll or two. Including mine. So I appreciate reviews written after someone has used a camera for a long time. Alan D. writes such a review of the Vivitar/Superheadz Ultra Wide and Slim and says the gear lives up to the hype. Read Filthy Beast – The Vivitar/Superheadz Wide and Slim Reappraised After 1,000 Shots

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Are you even reading this introduction?

πŸ’» Scarce things are more valuable, and common things less so. You can create a sense of false scarcity to make a thing seem more valuable. But when that thing is free, how valuable is it really, regardless of its scarcity? Ming Thien ponders it. Read On visual economics and scarcity

Bourbon bar
Nikon FA, 35-70mm Zoom Nikkor, Agfa Vista 200, 2019.

πŸ’» An old story of the founder of the Jimmy John’s sandwich shop chain trophy-hunting elephants has been making the rounds of the Internet again. Nick Gerlich saw it too, and asks us to put away the pitchforks for a whole host of reasons. Read Animal Style

πŸ“· Mark O’Brien offers some tips from the trenches for using that old camera you just found or bought. He offers some easy fixes for simple problems and some advice about film and batteries. Read Using Vintage Cameras, Some Tips to Follow

πŸ“· Compact point-and-shoot 35mm cameras are all the rage these days. Pentax’s Espio line offers some strong performers, but they haven’t caught on yet and can still be had at reasonable prices. Phil Harrison, writing for 35mmc, reviews one of the Espios, the 115M. Read The Pentax Espio 115M Gold Mini Review

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Here are the blog posts I liked most this week.

πŸ’» Monette shares some photos, some truly lovely compositions, from Enoshima, Japan. Read Enoshima

Holly on the holly trees
Nikon FA, 35-70mm Zoom Nikkor, Agfa Vista 200, 2019.

πŸ’» I don’t know the name of this blogger (hey bloggers! use a name! even a made up one!) but he (she?) shares some stunning black-and-white photos of an abbey in Scotland. Read Dundrennan Abbey

πŸ“· Craig Sinclair, writing for Casual Photophile, tells a charming personal account of his journey through film photography. It all started with an Italian camera for 127 film and passed through several Spotmatics. Read My Favorite Camera Is Not My Best Camera, Nor Is It My Favorite Camera

πŸ“· Mike Connealy picked up a Hikari 2002 35mm SLR recently and put it through its paces. You’ve never heard of the Hikari 2002? You might know it better as the Vivitar V3800N. Read Dumpster diving for cameras

πŸ“· The Rollei 16 was a tiny spy camera for 16mm film in special cartridges. Nicholas Middleton found some original film for his Rollei 16, long expired, and shot it. He got surprisingly good results. Read Rollei 16 Cassettes

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It’s a great big beautiful wonderful incredible super spectacular day, because I’ve digested this week’s best blog posts for you!

πŸ’» If you are a leader, or even a parent, sometimes you have to hold your people accountable to their responsibilities. Dave Bailey offers a useful heuristic for how to do this: the accountability dial, which offers five levels of heat. He writes for startup executives but you can learn from him too. Read How to Manage a Team of Owners

Maker's Mark Distillery
Nikon FA, 35-70mm f/3.3-4.5 AI-s Zoom Nikkor, Arista EDU 200, 2019.

πŸ’» This post is deeply interesting to me because in the five years before taking my current job I worked for startup software companies and was granted stock options. They always felt like a lottery ticket to me, but I couldn’t fully explain why. All I know is that I never made much money on them. Steve Blank explains why in great detail. Read Startup Stock Options — Why A Good Deal Has Gone Bad

πŸ“· I’ve followed N. S. Palmer‘s writings on society and belief systems for years and feel he’s really hit his stride. He draws you in like you’re an old friend, and then uses that as a platform to introduce challenging new ideas. His latest post is a great example. Read How To Be Crazy — Constructively

πŸ“· Peggy Anne reviews the Ricoh KR-10, a circa 1980 35mm SLR that mounts all of your Pentax K-mount lenses. These Ricohs are good performers, if basic in features, and are solid bargains on the used market. Read Ricoh KR-10

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