Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Would the universe implode if I stopped sharing my Saturday morning blog-post roundup? Certainly not, but a man can dream of doing something so vital.

Katherine Griffiths shares a photo-booth strip from her collection of two young women. In the booth’s privacy, they shed the facades we all carry in the world, and were fully themselves as they enjoyed their friendship. You can see it on their faces. Read Gorgeous Giggling Girls

Reality is messy and non-linear. Yet we need a way to tell about our lives in ways that make sense. So we all reframe our pasts into stories. It’s how we make sense of our world. Writing for The Book of Life, Jess Cotton encourages us to find a tender and noble story to tell about ourselves, and assures us such a story is there for even you. Read How to Narrate Your Life Story

I’m generally for free markets, but Seth Godin makes a great point about unbridled capitalism: it can quickly become a race to the bottom focused on short-term gains. He uses the first advertisement for Coca-Cola to illustrate. Read The reason we need the FDA (hint: it’s marketers)

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

A fresh harvest of good blog posts, gift-wrapped for you.

Are you never satisfied, never happy? Derek Sivers suggests cultivating a bronze mindset. Think Olympic medals. I’ll let him explain. Read Think like a bronze medalist, not silver

Susie Trexler toured Washington State’s Whidbey Island with her camera and captured a number of drop-dead gorgeous homes in the little village of Coupeville. Read Coupeville: Whidbey Island’s History Through Architecture

I live in Indianapolis. Noted urban analyst Aaron Renn wrote an insightful piece this week about Indianapolis city culture and how you get things done here. It’s fascinating. Read Ten Things You Need To Know About Indianapolis City Culture

Jonas Downey, writing for Signal v. Noise, shares excellent thoughts for software companies on how they can make UI changes without alienating their users. Read How to launch software changes without pissing people off

I like my bourbon, but I gave up alcohol for Lent. So it was timely to read John DeVore‘s essay on why men drink. He doesn’t know why, but he wrote 19 paragraphs about it anyway. Read Why Men Drink

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Happy Saturday! Not much to share from the Interwebz this week. Dear Interwebz: step up your game next week, k?

Robert Osborne died this week. He was the fellow who used to introduce the old films on the Turner Classic Movies channel. He seemed an affable fellow, but apparently he was nothing short of beloved in Hollywood. I even heard Terry Gross say nice things about him on Fresh Air this week. Mike Evanier tells of the two times he encountered Osborne. Read About Robert Osborne

Ming Thien shares a nice series of photographs, of architecture and rooftops in Porto, Portugal. He captured some lovely color. Read Photoessay: Entropy from a distance in Porto

The secret to happiness, Jason Fried (writing for Signal v. Noise) says, is to not have expectations. Take life as it comes, and you won’t be disappointed. This is a very Stoic way of approaching life. Read Living without expectations

To round it out this week, here’s a photo. This is a detail on a bank building here in Indianapolis. Pentax K1000, 55mm f/1.8 SMC Pentax, Kodak Gold 400.

Bank Building Detail

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

I read too many blogs. I can hardly keep up. It’s probably time to drop some from my reader. Yet I resist, because I never know when one of them is going to be brilliant and I’ll want to include it in my weekly Saturday roundup.

In tech, the unicorn startup with its astonishing growth is everything. Writing for Signal v. Noise, David Heinemeier Hansson argues that this model of growth über alles is a poverty that corrupts. Read Exponential growth devours and corrupts

1959 Cadillac Coupe DeVille b

1959 Cadillac tail light

The 1959 Cadillac was a study in ridiculous stylistic excess, yet it remains an icon of the fabulous 1950s. Paul Niedermeyer tells its story on Curbside Classic. Read Curbside Classic: 1959 Cadillac – False Prophet of a New Era

Speaking of cars and tech unicorns, there’s been quite an upheaval against Uber after a story of a woman who says she experienced heavy sexual harassment as an employee there. People are voting with their wallets by trying second-fiddle competitor Lyft. Venture capitalist Bryce Roberts tried Lyft recently, and he says that the experience is so like Uber that both companies should be worried. Read My First Lyft Ride

Nick Gerlich makes a good case that the new YouTube TV — essentially a basic-cable replacement service — is going to fail. Read All About You

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Happy weekend, Roadies, and happy reading from the blog posts I enjoyed most this week!

I’m not good at pausing to rest. If I’m not busy, I’m not happy. Johanna Rothman argues that rests are the key to productivity. Read When Do You Take a Break?

A blogger I know only as Evangelina07, who loves to travel, shares what she’s learned about making good vacation photos. I learned a few things! Read Easy tips to improve your vacation photos

Alister Scott explains why a password like correct-horse-battery-stable is far more secure than the kinds of passwords most sites require (i.e., Tr0ub4dor&3). Read Computer Security: Passwords

Writing for The Book of Life, Jess Cotton explains the psychology behind the Seven Deadly Sins. Read Beyond the Seven Deadly Sins

Kelly-Shane Fuller figured out how to process Kodachrome… in colorat home. Let that sink in for a minute. He wrote about it for Film Shooters Collective, and shared some of his results. Read Kodachrome Gave Us Those Nice Bright Colors

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Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Here’s my Saturday roundup of Good Blog Posts™ from around the Internet this week.

Parenting is full of unexpected adventures, and Jaye Watson humorously tells of one that involves her son’s posterior. Read Splintered

Aaron Renn says that journalist Richard Longworth saw it coming way back in 1998, how globalization and free trade was going to create a social crisis. You know, the social crisis we appear to be currently embarking on. Read How Richard Longworth Predicted 20 Years Ago That Globalization Would Cause A Social Crisis

This week was a great one for film photographers in the blogosphere. Everybody seems to be figuring out that film photography is making a resurgence. Not to pre-digital levels; never to pre-digital levels. But enough that new films are being announced, and some people are wondering how to buy an old film camera to try it out.

And so Dan James wrote a great article about how to get started in film photography for £27. (He’s in the UK; that’s about 34 US dollars.) Read How To Start Film Photography For £27.

And James over at Casual Photophile gives you an even bigger budget: $50. He polled his entire writing team and got some solid recommendations. Read We Pick Your First Film Camera For Under $50

And finally, Nicholas Middleton reminds us that Take Your Box Camera to Work Day is rapidly approaching. Are you in? Read Tuesday 28th February is ‘Take Your Box Camera to Work Day’

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