Film Photography

The first review of my new book, Textures of Ireland, is in, and it’s positive!

Fellow photoblogger Mike Connealy says in his review, “One thing I have particularly enjoyed about both of Jim’s books is the fact that they closely resemble the style and content of his photography blog, Down the Road. The difference, of course, being that one can enjoy the high quality images on paper without the size limitations and unpredictable variability of any online presentation. Whether displayed on paper or on a screen, however, Jim’s stories are always first rate, reflecting his dedication to achieving ever more mastery of image making and narration.”

You can read the full review here.

If you haven’t picked up your copy yet you can do it here. $14.99 + shipping for the paper book, $4.99 for the PDF!

Review of Textures of Ireland

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Film Photography

Photos from my new book, Textures of Ireland

Here are a few of the photos I share in my new book, Textures of Ireland — black-and-white film photos from all over the Irish isle.

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Breathnach's

Breathnach’s Bar
Canon PowerShot S95
2016

I am a homebody. I like to be home. It’s my favorite place to be.

If you’ve followed my many road trips on this blog you might be surprised to read that. I do love to follow the old roads, see where they lead, photograph what’s on them. But then I want to go right home.

Lately I’ve wanted to be anywhere but home. I’m sick of my self, of my anxieties and my worries and my frustrations. I want to shed them. It’s why I’ve found myself pricing airline tickets to go back to Ireland. That was a place where I forgot myself for a while. It was wonderful.

Breathnach’s is a little pub in Oughterard, in County Galway. It’s where we took our first supper in Ireland, Sept. 3, 2016. I forget what we ate, except that it involved plenty of Guinness and a lovely conversation with the bar’s owner.

Margaret caught me dreaming. She gave me immediate permission to buy tickets if I found them under a certain price. She loves to travel and would rather be anywhere but home.

Photography, Travel

single frame: Breathnach’s Bar

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At Connemara National Park

I had lunch the other day with my colleague Rich, and when I told him of my Irish honeymoon he exclaimed delightedly, “Oh! My wife and I were in Ireland in May! The whole time, I felt like we were in a postcard. Especially when we visited Connemara National Park.” I knew just what he meant — Margaret and I visited there too. My camera captured candylike colors.

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We found another postcard view at Drumcliffe. There’s a little church there, and the grave of poet W. B. Yeats. And there’s this view of Benbulben, a prominent rock formation.

Giant's Causeway

The cinematic scenes at The Giant’s Causeway can all generate postcard-worthy photography. I like this scene from the Causeway’s entrance the best.

Killybegs

After an especially long day, we stopped for dinner in the fishing-port town of Killybegs in County Donegal. We had this view from our dining table. On our way out, we stopped in the early-evening light to photograph the colorful scene.

Kylemore Abbey

Finally, here’s the castle at Kylemore Abbey in County Galway. I’ll tell its story in an upcoming post.

Canon PowerShot S95.

Photography, Travel

Postcard views of Ireland

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Travel

Seven tips for driving in Ireland

We wanted to fully control our itinerary in Ireland. So no packaged tours for us: we decided what we wanted to see, no matter how far off the beaten path — or to go nowhere, if we felt like it. So we rented a car and drove it all over Ireland wherever our noses led […]

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