Bridgeton Covered Bridge

Inside the Bridgeton Covered Bridge
Olympus Stylus Epic Zoom 80
Fujicolor 200 (probably)
2006

I love this photograph so much that I have a print of it framed and hanging in my home. It’s from a visit I made to the covered bridge at Bridgeton, in Parke County, Indiana, in 2006, just after it was built. Arson claimed the original 1868 covered bridge here.

When I was in my 20s, I drove up to Bridgeton and its first bridge when I needed some time alone to think. (I told that story here.) So when the new bridge was completed, I made a trip as soon as I could. I’m glad I did, because since then these beams have been covered in graffiti. I don’t mind graffiti, actually. I’m just happy to have this photo of the naked beams.

Photography

single frame: Inside the Bridgeton Covered Bridge

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Bridgeton bridge

I have made occasional pilgrimages to the covered bridge at Bridgeton for more than a quarter century now. Well off the beaten path, I enjoy the quiet there — except in October during the Covered Bridge Festival, when it teems with people. I avoid Bridgeton in October.

I shot this using my Olympus XA on Fujifilm Superia X-tra 800. I have had mixed results shooting this film in my Pentax ME, but every photo I shoot on this film in my XA turns out grand.

Photography

Captured: Bridgeton bridge

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Cross this bridge at a walk

Cross this bridge at a walk
Kodak Monitor Six-20 Anastigmat Special
Kodak Gold 200 (expired)
2013

I won’t soon forget the day I made this photograph. Margaret and I were still dating, and I took her to Bridgeton to see the bridge.

Bridgeton had always been a private place for me, a place I go when life has knocked me around hard and I need to reconnect with the good in the world. At first it was because the people of Bridgeton had kept the original 1868 bridge in good repair. Later it was because after arson destroyed that bridge, those same people rallied to build a new bridge.

It was this day I shared this little piece of my heart with her. Funny it felt that way, because some years before I told the world about Bridgeton on this blog here.

It was a truly lovely day. Margaret packed a light picnic lunch, which we shared on a grassy area alongside the bridge. She asked a passerby to photograph us with another film camera I had along. I can’t find that photograph!

If you’re wondering why this photo on Kodak Gold 200 is in black and white, it’s because Dwayne’s processed it in black-and-white chemicals by mistake. On this photo, at least, it worked out fine.

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Film Photography

single frame: Cross this bridge at a walk

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