Stamps

The Stamp Shop
Olympus XA2
Kodak ProImage 100
2021

A quarter century ago, Massachusetts Avenue in Downtown Indianapolis was a hodgepodge of random small businesses. In the years since, this street has become hip. Rising rents forced most of the original tenants out. Somehow, The Stamp Shop hangs on.

I bought some Kodak ProImage 100 to try it. I didn’t fall in love with it on this first roll. I shot most of that roll while riding my bike through rural Boone County, and the sickly greens this film gave me didn’t remotely match reality. I had better luck when I finished the roll on a short walk along Mass Ave.

I hadn’t used my Olympus XA2 in more than a year, which is why I chose it. I like how this camera is essentially a fixed-focus point-and-shoot — its default settings when you open the camera are good for the majority of what I shoot.

I’ve owned two XA2s and both of them have vignetted slightly. I’m not crazy about that. But the camera is so pleasant to use otherwise that I overlook it.

When I shoot my next roll of this film I’ll put it through one of my known-good SLRs, which I think will give me a better idea of this film’s capabilities.

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Film Photography

single frame: The Stamp Shop

A shot up a sidewalk on Indy’s Mass Ave.

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Downtown Stonegate

Downtown Stonegate
Pentax IQZoom 170SL
Fujifilm Fujicolor 200
2021

This might look like the heart of a classic Indiana small town, but it’s not.

Stonegate is a tony neighborhood here in Zionsville. The heart of Zionsville, the original town, is 3½ miles to the east. Over the last 20 years or so, Zionsville annexed a lot of land to its west as farmers sold out and developers built new neighborhoods.

As you drive (or, as was the case for me this day, biked) along Stonegate’s curved main street, at about the midpoint you come upon this little business district. These buildings are fashioned to look like they were built a century ago. They stand in a part of Stonegate where the houses look like modern takes on early 20th-century house designs — foursquares and bungalows with prominent front porches.

It’s all rather charming. It’s also rather expensive, but that’s life in Zionsville.

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Film Photography

single frame: Downtown Stonegate

A look at a fake downtown.

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Zionsville Little League field

Second base
Yashica-12
Kodak Vericolor III (expired 7/86) @ EI 80
2021

With a roll of expired Vericolor III in the Yashica-12, I drove over to Lions Park here in Zionsville and photographed one of the Little League fields. This is the best photo by far from that outing.

Thanks to Kodachromeguy for sending me this Vericolor to play with. I have more in the freezer for another day.

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Film Photography

single frame: Second base

Second base at one of the Little League fields in Zionsville’s Lions Park.

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Old farmstead

Old farmstead
Sears KSX-P
50mm f/1.7 Auto Sears MC
Foma Fomapan 400
L110, Dilution B

The subdivision where I live used to be a farm, run by the Ottinger family. I know the family’s name only because the park at the center of our subdivision is named for the family, and a sign posted there tells a little of the story.

When you enter our subdivision at its main entrance, an old farmhouse stands on the right. A family still lives there; who knows, it might still be the Ottingers. This is their driveway and some of their outbuildings.

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Film Photography

single frame: Old farmstead

What is probably the original farmstead of the farm that became the subdivision I live in.

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Bauble in the window

Bauble in the window
Nikon Df
50mm f/1.8 AF-S Nikkor Special Edition
2021

Margaret and I went Downtown for a photo walk a few weeks ago. Lots of people were out, and it was wonderful to be among them after so long cooped up at home.

We window shopped along popular Massachusetts Avenue. She was drawn to this charming necklace. I went back Downtown a few days later and bought it for her, for her birthday. She never reads my blog, so I’m not tipping her off here!

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Photography

single frame: Bauble in the window

Something spotted while window shopping.

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Sign to Mexico, Indiana

This way to Mexico
Kodak EasyShare Z730
2007

I didn’t make a trip to Texas to make this photograph. Rather, I drove to northern Indiana.

I don’t know how the town of Mexico, Indiana, got its name. All I know is that it was right on US 31 for a lot of years, until Indiana decided to move it and widen it to four divided lanes in the late 60s or early 70s. The new highway bypassed tiny Mexico, and I’m sure through traffic dried up instantly.

You’ll find this sign along current US 31 at a crossroads with Mexico’s Main Street. If you follow this sign, you’ll find that there’s not much to Mexico.

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Photography

single frame: This way to Mexico

A giant sign pointing to a tiny town in northern Indiana.

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