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Recommended reading

πŸ’» This is what it looks like when a truss bridge gets washed away in a flood. Don Friedman shares the video. Read Real-Time News

1962 Ford Thunderbird convertible a
Canon PowerShot S80, 2013

πŸ’» Tom Halter tells the history of the gas-station credit card. I just love knowing the origins of esoteric stuff like this. Read Credit Card of a Lifetime: Parting Ways With BP After 30 Years – A Brief History of Gas Station Credit Cards

πŸ’» A lonely old Ford Thunderbird parked by the side of the road led David Joseph to reflect on family, and living, and sex, and death. Read CC Momento Mori: 1960 Ford Thunderbird – Sex and Death

πŸ’» Shawn Granton came of age in the 1990s. His memories of that decade are very different from the current ’90s nostalgia. He compares and contrasts. Read On the nostalgia and reality of a past decade

πŸ“· Peggy Marsh puts the Zenit 122 through its paces. It’s a Soviet 35mm SLR. Read Zenit 122

πŸ“· Like Mark O’Brien, I’m not enthralled with leaf-shutter SLRs. Too much that can go wrong. But he found one, a Topcon Uni, in good shape and got some good results with it. Read Some Fun with the Topcon Uni SLR

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9 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. Andy Umbo says:

    Interesting segment on the gas station credit card…never had one, tho, and none of the people in my family ever had one. My depression era parents instilled in us the idea that if you couldn’t budget and afford to pay cash for gas, maybe you needed to stay home or ride the bus!

    • When I was married the first time, my wife had me sign up for a Shell card and insisted we get all of our gas from Shell. In those days, it really was better gas. But it was a pain in the neck always having to look for a Shell station. What was nice about it was that it was easy to track what we spent on gas. Today I use Mint for that but back then that wasn’t as much of a thing.

  2. Michael says:

    The historic Yellowstone flooding will likely cause us to alter plans. Even once they open up the park again, I expect it will be a huge mess and ability to see/do some things won’t exist.

    I wouldn’t imagine a bridge of such design could withstand that much lateral force. Wonder if waters had ever reached the bottom of it in the past. Several ugly concrete bridges after Katrina were shifted on their supports up to a couple feet. It’s amazing to think of how high the water needed to be and the amount of force it has to move that much concrete.

    • At least one of the highway bridges, the one at Bay St. Louis, was destroyed by uplift forces. Water rose to just below the decking and waves caused panels to uplift and tear off from their anchors. Irregular and uncontrolled uplift is the same hazard that operators of jack-up drilling rigs face when they are first jacking up out of the water or lowering back into the water into float condition. It is amazing what water can do.

      • Michael says:

        90 across the bay was surprisingly low so no surprise to me it had gotten wiped out. On the east side of the bay near Henderson Point Beach are the sections I recall as 90 curved and went over the RR tracks. I did a lot of work on both sides.

    • It’s too bad that you have to change your plans. Of course, a truss bridge can’t withstand the force of raging water. They don’t weigh very much compared to other bridges and aren’t at all built to withstand significant lateral force. Just because of a concrete arch bridge’s considerable weight they are more hardy in wind and water.

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