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Recommended reading

šŸ’» I’ve always loved to study the design of things we use every day. Daniel Stern looks at the design of automobile instrument panels, featuring one he considers to be a model of good usability: the 1962 Plymouth. Read CC Design: Chrysler Studies Ergonomics in 1962, and Now Just Look!

1962 Plymouth Belvedere
Canon PowerShot S95, 2012 (yes, this is the dashboard of a 1962 Plymouth)

šŸ’» Are you a blogger on WordPress.com? They’ve changed their pricing structure for paid plans, and have further reduced and restricted the free plan. It’s a mixed bag, some good, some not good. Fortunately, your old plan is grandfathered if you want it to stay as is. Michael Pick explains on behalf of WordPress.com. Read Introducing WordPress Pro: One Plan, InfiniteĀ Possibilities

šŸ’» One San Francisco area school lets the families of its students who are homeless sleep in the gym. It is noticeably improving learning outcomes for the students. Gail Cornwall has the story. Read How a Homeless Shelter in a School Paid Off in the Classroom

šŸ“· I’m increasingly “meh” about boutique, specialty films. But Mark O’Brien shows that the limited-edition Rollei Paul and Reinhold black-and-white film is a sparkling performer. Read Paul and Reinhold 640 film – One Roll Review

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4 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. The instrument panel article is very interesting. The best legibility of any of my cars is my “primitive” 1981 BMW 320i. The digits are big and white on a black background. The night lighting is red. Instantly readable, no deep concentration needed. Our newer VW GTI cars have had far poorer displays, especially at night.

    • I’ve never had a car whose display wasn’t at least adequate. The one in my Passat is adequate. My favorite was the one in my two Toyota Matrixes. They were backlit red day and night, but completely black with the ignition off.

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