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Recommended reading

💻 Until about 30 years ago, cars used to rust. One car my family owned in the 1970s rusted so bad that there were giant holes in the body. Several companies offered rustproofing services to car owners, with mixed results. Arguably the best known of them was a company called Rusty Jones. Eric703 tells the fascinating story. Read Automotive History: Rusty Jones — The Face of Rustproofing

Sacred
Nikon N8008, 28-80mm f/3.3-5.6 AF Nikkor, Kodak Tri-X 400, 2017

💻 Mark Evanier has a story of a lecherous, hotrodding city bus driver — and how they got him transferred off the route they were taking. Read Tales of My Childhood #22

📷 Mark O’Brien tries the new Kodak Tri-X single-use camera and pronounces it pretty good. Read Kodak’s Tri-X Single Use Camera

📷 I wrote this week about the mixed results I get from Kodak T-Max P3200. Steven Lawrence got great results with this film in my favorite developer, HC-110. He says the secret is in the agitation method. Read the home show on kodak t-max p3200

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8 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. Andy Umbo says:

    One of the reasons most pros I knew couldn’t be bothered with T-Max films, is not only the difference of face tones from conventional film, but the fact that Kodak specified an entirely different agitation method than what people had perfected over the years. When the T-max roll-out happened, the Kodak Pro introduction show we had for it in my town, the presenters were very specific about how it needed the new agitation method, which seemed much more violent that we were used to. Once again “meh” for us. Good luck!

    • I get good results in HC-110 on T-Max 100 with my standard agitation scheme. So there’s that. I have one or two rolls of P3200 left and I’ll try Steven’s agitation scheme on them to see if it helps, but after that I think I’m just sticking with HP5 pushed.

  2. I’ve come to appreciate how important agitation method is. I got poor results with Ultrafine Xtreme 400 and CineStill Monobath until I switched to 2 inversions/minute at 70 degrees. I discovered I had been over-agitating and that caused heavy grain.

    • Sigh. I’m just so not into film developing’s intricacies. I just want films that work with a consistent method, so I can get consistently good results.

  3. That single-use Tri-X camera has the same f/10 lens that some clever Chinese tinkerers have mounted into plastic l39 and Leica M mounts. I have one, and it is OK. It’s best to crop off a few mm from the edges.

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