Photographs

Still lifes on Kodak T-Max P3200

I’ve been experimenting with Kodak’s ultra-fast T-Max P3200 black-and-white film. I know it’s great for handheld night shots (here are some), and I’ve had some luck using it for candid family photos indoors. But does it work as a general-purpose film? I mounted my 50mm f/2.8 Micro-Nikkor macro lens to my Nikon FA, screwed it onto a tripod, and photographed some household objects on a table. I developed these in HC-110, Dilution B.

Pot
60 Chev model
Belleek
Mug
Olympus Trip 35

The P3200’s heavy grain creates a certain creaminess to these images, and it’s an interesting look. I’m glad I tried it. But I think I prefer a smoother look. Because I had the Nikon FA on a tripod, I could have used a much slower film and accepted the slower shutter speeds I would have gotten.

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8 thoughts on “Still lifes on Kodak T-Max P3200

  1. Not unexpected results: high-speed film inevitably yields increased grain and lowered contrast. At least film photographers accept this. Digital photographers seem obsessed with the idea it should be possible to take pictures in the dark. ;)

    • I have loved it when shooting night city photos, but otherwise not so much. I’m off to Chicago again soon. I hope I have a pocketable film camera that can go to 3200, because if I do, I’ll load P3200.

  2. Pete says:

    I have used this film once and I was very disappointed with it but, admittedly, I went at it like a bull at a gate without much thought. Your results are way more successful than mine by many degrees. Having seen yours, maybe I’ll try it again with more thought.

  3. While the images from high ISO captures on my Fuji X-T3 are very clean and usable up to ISO 6400, I am disappointed by my photographs from any 35mm film with ISO higher than 400.

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