Film Photography

Fomapan 200 in the Konica Auto S2

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Of the many large, heavy 35mm rangefinder cameras I tried over the years, the Konica Auto S2 is one of two that I kept. (The other was the sublime Yashica Lynx 14e.) I liked it better than the vaunted Yashica Electro 35, better than the famed Minolta Hi-Matic 7. I don’t think this camera is objectively better than any of my other now-departed rangefinders — it just fits me better somehow.

Konica Auto S2

Of the cameras that I own but don’t need, of which there are many, I’m trying to give them annual exercise. In August and early September, it was the Auto S2’s turn.

I’m pushing through some Fomapan films that I bought on deep sale not long ago. I’m also experimenting with Ilford’s ID-11 developer. I suppose I could have titled this post “Fomapan 200 in ID-11” as well, because that’s just what I did. I shot the film at EI 125, as I seem to have best luck with it there, and developed it at the ISO 200 time.

One thing I like about ID-11 over HC-110, which has been my go-to, is that I get longer development times. Sometimes HC-110 puts me too close for comfort to five minutes — I’ve gotten unpredictable results with development times faster than that. Yet HC-110 is a more convenient developer for how infrequently I develop film. It keeps so well and it stretches so far!

I brought the Auto S2 with me as I went about my business for several weeks until the film was gone. For whatever reason, I encountered a lot scenes that said “shoot portrait, not landscape” to me. I made some decent photographs, but nothing that should go into my portfolio. Here are some of them.

Moore Road
2021-09-13-0005 proc
At Starkey Park
At Starkey Park
At Starkey Park
6516
VW grille

Every time I shoot the Konica Auto S2, I’m so happy I kept it in Operation Thin the Herd.

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22 thoughts on “Fomapan 200 in the Konica Auto S2

  1. Andy Umbo says:

    The more I read about those nice 60’s and 70’s Japanese single lens rangefinders (and remember using them myself), the more I think I could probably get rid of all the Pentax/Canon film SLR’s I’m hanging on to and just cover my 35mm film “jones” by getting a clean version of one of these. When I really look at what lenses I use when I do shoot those cameras, most of the time I’m in the 35mm to 50mm range anyway, enough so I could make the single lens work for me…

  2. matt says:

    Nice — I liked the railing photo.
    Coincidentally, I’m also shooting this film stock (branded as Arista EDU) in my newly-acquired TLR.

      • matt says:

        That works well for me, then: I’m using D-76 1:1 as my developer of choice at the moment. Hopefully I’ll get a few good ones — this is a ‘learning roll’.

  3. arhphotographic says:

    Many thanks for the timely post as I have to decide soon whether to go with Kentmere or try Fomapan. Once again some great images.
    Andrew

  4. Roger Meade says:

    I love the image of the trail through the woods. It has a surreal feel, as if the trees are going to grab the next passer by. Almost as if you were using a fisheye, not a 45mm.

    • If you try the film, do a test roll where you shoot each shot at 125 and at 200, and have your lab process as normal. Some people prefer this film at 125. I find that when I send this film out to my usual labs I like the look best at 200, but when I develop it myself it looks best at 125. I wish I knew why!

      • Andy Umbo says:

        Your lab may have experience with this film and be pushing it a bit, even tho you tell them you shot it at 200. They could be used to seeing it a little “lite” and giving it a little nudge…

        • That would be my bet. I’ve sent this film to two or three labs and it always comes back fine at 200, so it must just be known in the industry that you need to adjust dev time.

  5. tbm3fan says:

    Speaking of Konica and Fomapan I happen to have put a roll of that film in my Konica Auto S1.6 to give both a try. There is also a roll of Fomapan in my Minolta 600si and Minolta V2. Problem as always is time to shoot since there are other critical time things to finish. When done I’ll be using my standard D-76

  6. I know what you mean about short developing times with HC110. If the time with Dilution B is too short, you can use the unofficial dilution H which is twice the dilution (1+62) and twice the developing time.

    • I don’t know why I get hung up on this, but using Dil. H means I need to use my 500ml tank to get enough developer, and that seems wasteful to me for one roll of 35mm! Maybe I should get over myself.

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