Travel

Cherry blossoms in Lexington Cemetery

I love a good cemetery. So, it seems, do the people of Lexington, Kentucky. Their largest cemetery, Lexington Cemetery, was full of people on the spring afternoon Margaret and I visited.

I’d never seen a cemetery with so many people in it. There was no funeral — people were just there to enjoy it, as they would a large park. At first I thought it was a little odd, so many people walking and relaxing in this place of the dead. I like doing that, but I think I’m unusual. I usually have cemeteries largely or entirely to myself. Not in Lexington!

The flowering trees were in bloom on this early spring Saturday. Margaret and I walked and photographed the lovely scenery. And then we came upon the cherry blossoms.

A long lane in the cemetery was blocked to cars, and was full of people strolling slowly through. Easily a dozen people had brought a photographer with them to make individual and group portraits here. We had never seen anything like it!

Lexington Cemetery
Lexington Cemetery
Lexington Cemetery
Lexington Cemetery
Lexington Cemetery
Lexington Cemetery
Lexington Cemetery
Lexington Cemetery

Nikon Df, 28-80mm f/3.3-5.6G AF Nikkor

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15 thoughts on “Cherry blossoms in Lexington Cemetery

  1. DougD says:

    Very pretty, but that looks so odd, all those people and no masks. Cherry blossoms in Toronto’s High Park are fenced off to prevent crowding.

  2. Nancy Stewart says:

    I share your interest in walking in cemeteries … I find it relaxing. Although beautiful at Lexington, I would prefer a quiet country cemetery. It is a great place for photos, that’s for sure.

    • I stop in country cemeteries a lot, when I come upon them. But there’s something about the size and scale of a cemetery like this one that is compelling.

  3. tbm3fan says:

    I wonder if the Cherry Blossoms were early although I’m sure the Cemetery doesn’t keep track. Japan does keep track and theirs peaked the earliest in their recorded 1200 years of history meaning…

  4. “I’d never seen a cemetery with so many people in it. There was no funeral — people were just there to enjoy it, as they would a large park. At first I thought it was a little odd, so many people walking and relaxing in this place of the dead.”

    Before actual parks became a thing in the mid-nineteenth century (when the Olmsteads came on to the scene), I’ve read that people would treat cemeteries like parks, as they were the most “park-like” thing then. It wasn’t uncommon for folks to have their Sunday picnic in the cemetery!

    • A cemetery picnic wouldn’t bother me a bit, but I’m sure it would offend many sensibilities today!

      Every city I’ve lived in – South Bend, Terre Haute, and Indianapolis, Indiana — show the fingerprints of George Kessler. He designed their park and boulevard systems. I’m blessed to live in places with lovely city parks!

  5. Several times in the warmer months of the year, I would accompany my parents to visit the graves of our relatives. Sometimes, they would bring some flowers to plant or grass clippers to trim around the headstones. I would often wander off to look at the names on the stones. Some had little round photos of the deceased as well. One time, I came across a saying on a headstone that has stayed with me since I first saw it 50 plus years ago…”Friend pause awhile ‘er you go by and look upon my earthy bed. Then bear in mind you too shall lie in cold, dark ground when you are dead.”

  6. I do love a good walk through a cemetery – I would especially love a walk through this one. Those trees are just gorgeous. And I bet they smell phenomenal!

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