Blogosphere

Recommended reading

💻 Longtime, popular blogger Ann Althouse turned off comments on her blog. She had an extremely active comment section, and because she writes about politics she spent a lot of time dealing with trolls. So I don’t blame her for turning comments off. But it’s what she says near the end of the post that makes me share it today: she wonders what difference it will make in her as a writer to not have to worry about comments anymore. Read I didn’t plan for yesterday to be so momentus.

Trains
Nikon F3HP, 35mm f/2.8 AI Nikkor, Kodak T-Max P3200, 2018

💻 In this time when social media “connects” us with so many more people than non-online life affords, it’s surprisingly easy to feel envy all the more often. Lawrence Yeo considers why, and offers some thoughts on how to combat it. Read Envy is the Cancer of the Soul

💻 Nandakumar Narasimhan extensively photographed the train system in India, trains that are slowly disappearing, and shares some of his photos on the Kosmo Foto site. Read Capturing a disappearing generation of Indian trains on film

📷 Peggy Marsh writes a terrific review of the Vest Pocket Kodak, the first camera for 127 film, from the 1910s. It’s so tiny! Read VPK Vest Pocket Kodak

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5 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. Andy Umbo says:

    I have never heard of Althouse, altho she lives in Madison Wisconsin, near me. When I jumped to her blog from your site, I clicked the “about” section on her and she said she’s not political, and doesn’t contributed to any political party:

    “Please note that Althouse has an aversion to politics and belongs to no political party (or other organization) and never gives money to any candidates or causes.”

    Is this some humor from her, since you said she’s a political writer. Since I have never read or heard about her, I have no way to judge whether this is a “leg-pull” or not.

    I have to say, I love the internet blog-o-sphere for information, even tho it sometimes frustrates me the amount of inaccurate information that exists there, especially about cameras and photography. I’ve often though after I get my recently retired life on track and pared down, I might start a blog that goes through, step-by-step, everything I’ve learned about film, and darkroom work, and sheet film cameras over the last 45 years of professional usage. So, so much inaccurate info on-line! I’m not sure I’d have a comments section, tho, for a site like that, more likely an “e-mail me with information” address. I had a buddy who was a media blogger for a journalism institute for over 12 years, and when he finally felt the need to retire, he was happy to do so.

    I guess what I’m saying above, is that a blogger that’s just talking about themselves, things on their minds, or their feelings, is way off my list of what I’m looking for. So disinterested in stuff like that, or spending any amount of time with stuff like that. I’m always amazed at what I can only think are lonely people following a blog like that and constantly trolling it, so I can imagine her frustration. Having never read her blog, maybe I’m mis-reading it. But she isn’t the first person I’ve heard of to close comments off!

  2. There’s a certain peace that comes with reading something and letting it go. I get very few comments on my blog – lots of my readers are lurkers but many are friends who engage with me in other ways. So I don’t see it on my own blog but I see a ton of it in a few readers groups and frugal living groups I still belong to on Facebook. You would be surprised how argumentative and nasty these conversations can become mainly because people don’t have the good sense or maybe the self peace to just let it go.

    Great selection again today Jim! I liked the Indian train story a lot too!

    • I’ve worked to cultivate a pleasant comment section on this blog. When someone gets crappy I just delete their comment without apology or explanation. People get the hint and go away.

      • Your technique seems to work! I don’t often dwell on your comments section but it does seem far more productive than most.

        Only once have I received a snarky comment and I just ignored it. No need to take the bait.

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