Film Photography

Up close with the Olympus OM-2n

The fellow who gave me the Olympus OM-2n gave me another, so I put a couple rolls through to test it. The first roll was Kodak T-Max 400, which I showed you recently. The second roll was some Kodak Gold 400 expired since January, 2008, that I had lying around. I mounted a 50mm f/3.5 Zuiko Auto Macro lens that the fellow also gave me. This is one generous fellow.

What the heck is this?
Flowers up close
Flowers up close
Bee in the flower

These images look very good for film 12 years expired that was never stored cold. They needed very little post-processing. Color shifts are slight. Grain might be enhanced, but I never shot Kodak Gold 400 fresh before it was replaced by Kodak Ultramax 400 to know for sure.

Suncatcher
Ash leaves
High voltage

This 50mm macro lens performs beautifully. I own at least one more of them and have for years. This lens raises any color film above its station. This is also a fine lens for non-macro photography. Leave it focused at infinity for anything beyond a couple feet away. It makes your OM camera almost point-and-shoot simple.

The house across the street
Retention pond by the Interstate

The OM-2n is just a wonderful SLR. I’m smitten. My SLR loyalties have been to Pentax first and Nikon second. The OM-2n threatens to have Olympus usurp at least the #2 position.

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12 thoughts on “Up close with the Olympus OM-2n

  1. -N- says:

    Nice shots. That macro lens is a beauty and a favorite walk-around lens when I have one of my OMs out.

    BTW, have you checked out the PrimeFilm XAS film scanner at B&H? It does 35mm, complete rolls. Takes a bit of work. Look on YouTube for some videos. Got one and returned it because it didn’t seem quite right, second one is very nice. The software to use is either VueScan or the SilverFast SE you can download for free.

    • Somehow I’ve managed to accumulate three of this lens!

      I’ve only briefly looked at the PrimeFilm XAs. I’m a little skittish because of the widespread reports of reliability concerns. I’ve been looking at the Plustek OpticFilm 8100. I’ll keep using my flatbed for 120, as it works great. But I do need a better solution for 35mm.

      • I’ll heartilly recommend the Plustek 8100 (I didn’t bother with the more expensive 8200 as it only adds IR dust removal and, as I shoot mostly B&W, wasn’t worth the extra outlay to me – I’ll just have to suck it up and do the dust spotting manually if needs be.)

        It’s a slower process than a flatbed as you have to scan one frame at a time, but the results – to my eyes at least – are noticeably superior to what my Epson V550 produces for 135.

        • Excellent! Thank you especially for recommending the 8100 over the 8200, I wasn’t sure which to do. I do mostly b/w as well so the 8100 should be fine. I’ll put one on my wish list. I’m growing ever more disappointed in the 35mm scans I get from my CanoScan 9000F.

        • If you look at any of my B&W 35mm shots on Flickr that I’ve uploaded in the past 18-months or so and add /sizes/o after the image ID in the URL, you should be able to see what the results at 3600 DPI look like (albeit after they’ve been processed and sharpened etc.). :)

        • I’m looking. You’re getting much better definition at full scan size than I’m getting with my CanoScan, even after I’ve sharpened as much as I can. That’s all I need to see: I’ll put a Plustek 8100 on my wish list.

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