Blogosphere

Recommended reading

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Now, this week’s best blog posts:

💻 Penelope Trunk had the kind of childhood where you’d understand completely if she cut her parents out of her life. But she’s been trying lately to reconnect with her mom. The two of them may have found a way to relate to each other through this pandemic. Read Emails my mom sent from her NYC co-op

Sligo alley
Canon PowerShot S95, 2016

💻 World War II was incredibly hard on the British, brandib reminds us — even everyday people could only try to survive. She reminds us that while life is hard now thanks to COVID-19, it’s not World-War-II-in-Great-Britain hard. Read Six Years And A Day

💻 The big email providers figured out how to block almost all spam. So why can’t social-media sites block fake news? Om Malik is sure it’s because engagement with those sites would sink like a stone. Read Why do social networks focus on the wrong problem?

📷 Alan D puts a new hot-shoe light meter to the test against several of his good autoexposure cameras, and shares the results. Read Lockdown Field Testing — The V201X Light Meter

📷 Why do we hobbyist photographers do what we do? Especially when some hipster on Instagram can post a right awful photograph and get a thousand Likes, while our superior work is ignored? James Tocchio offers some insight that should help you feel better. Read Why Take Pictures? Answering the Existential Crisis of the Photography Hobbyist

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7 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. tbm3fan says:

    Why we take photos? Is this a generational thing? He is 36 and thinks it is an existential question as to why. I’m 66 and and don’t even think about why since I have been doing it since 6 years old. I do it because I like to just like I enjoy working on my old cars. Fun is fun. My photography is mainly along the lines of documentation more than being artsy. Document where I was and what I saw in that time of my life. I then can go back in time, and with the aid of a picture, recall that period in pretty good detail. Whether someone likes it, I don’t post much at all anyway, doesn’t matter to me.

    • I’m quite sure I would not take nearly as many photos if I didn’t have a way to share them with others. I enjoy the act of photography in and of itself, but taking a billion photos nobody sees feels sort of pointless to me!

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