COVID-19

Meetingpallooza

At work, we’ve started a big, important project. Teams are executing while we’re still planning the middle and end of it. It’s packed my days with meetings. Is it just me, or are Zoom meetings more draining than meeting in person? I go from one Zoom meeting to another from 9 to 5:30, except for lunch because I decline lunch meetings. I need to eat and have a little down time.

Meanwhile email keeps arriving, and I’m absolutely bombarded with messages on Slack. Because I know I don’t have the discipline to not respond to incoming messages during meetings, it’s my habit when I’m in the office to leave my laptop at my desk. It lets me be present and pay attention in the meeting. I’m usually the only person in the room without a laptop. But on Zoom, the meeting is on the computer. And because my schedule is so heavily packed right now, if I don’t respond during meetings I’ll work late every night catching up on messages. No thanks.

Wild

I was Friday tired at the end of Wednesday this week. I hit the wall Thursday afternoon. I declined my 3:30 and 4 pm meetings and unplugged from everything for 90 minutes. I resurfaced for the 5 pm management huddle, which is just a time for us to check in on how we’re all doing. I went first, describing what I’m experiencing. Then I said it: this is intense and I can’t sustain it.

The room was silent for a minute, and someone changed the subject. We talked about three or four other things. Then the VP who was leading the meeting said, “I want to go back to what Jim said. I’m experiencing the same thing. Like Jim I don’t take my computer to meetings either so I can be present and focus, but now I can’t get away from the computer. Is anybody else handling this better?”

A few people had suggestions. I even made one, one that I came up with during the meeting: I’m going to block time in the morning and afternoon on my calendar and decline any future meeting requests that happen then. I’ll shut down Slack and email while I’m in my meetings and open it when I’m not, because I will have guaranteed time to respond to messages.

Will this work? Probably. But it might have some negative effects I can’t see right now. I’ll try it and see, and keep adapting from there. And I’ll liberally steal other peoples’ good ideas that work for them, and see if they work for me.

More isolation reports from -N-, JR Smith, Gerald Greenwood, Yuri Rasin, Johnny Martyr.

Last updated on 4 April 2020 by Jim Grey

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4 thoughts on “Meetingpallooza

  1. DougD says:

    Amen brother. I’m getting bombarded by email as well, and my back has been letting me know that it’s unhappy with my chair, or my lack of movement. So I’m trying to go for a stroll in the house at least every hour today.

    We are also getting lots of online systems training. Spend an hour with some Finnish guy reading you a power point about how to use Power Bi reporting for SAP. I guess all those head office people have to stay busy but the training is useless and a waste of everybody’s time :(

    • We have a two-mile loop on the main road around our subdivision and I walk that every day I can. It’s easy enough to keep away from others doing the same thing.

      Oh god SAP, my condolences.

  2. I don’t have online meetings, but I have to record my classes for students to watch every week. I don’t usually give homework, but I have to now because I can’t check understanding and progress in the classroom. Checking homework is a lot of work and I’m a couple of weeks behind. Plus I sometimes can’t do my work because the university server has crashed and so on. It’s very overwhelming sometimes, and I feel like I’m on the job 24/7. The remote class period was extended another three weeks the other day and I guess we’ll be doing it all semester. To save my sanity, I’ve decided to be more organised and only work during the hours I would have worked in normal times. Otherwise I’ll have a breakdown.

    • Oof, that’s some stress right there. That’s a great call to limit yourself to normal working hours. Hang in there, we’ll get through this.

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