Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill

Cooper’s Shop
Pentax K10D, 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SMC Pentax-DA AL
2019

As we packed to leave for Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill I considered which film camera I should take along. I still have 43 of them to choose from (full list here). It’s often hard to choose, and it was especially so this time for some reason.

I decided not to dither, and instead packed my digital Pentax K10D DSLR with its 18-55mm zoom.

The K10D was introduced in 2006, and the DSLR state of the art has advanced considerably since then. My wife’s six-year-newer Nikon D3200 can get some photos my K10D can’t, primarily in dim light. A couple of my dim-light shots would have been wonderful had they been less noisy and had I been able to choose a higher ISO for a faster shutter speed and less risk of shake.

But the vast majority of photos I make with the K10D are in good light, where the camera performs perfectly well. I love the warmth it captures.

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single frame: Cooper’s Shop

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11 thoughts on “single frame: Cooper’s Shop

  1. -N- says:

    Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe the older digital cameras used the CMOS sensor as opposed to something more used today – name of it eludes me. If I recall, the CMOS sensor is closer to film in quality or rendering, and combined with old glass is supposed to be rather outstanding. I almost went with Pentax when considering my first digital, but a friend loaned me his Nikon D70 for over a year, so I went with Nikon.

    • Joshua Fast says:

      You are correct, just have it flip flopped. Older digital cameras used a CCD sensor which grants beautiful colors and sharpness at the cost of low light performance. Most CCD sensors were extremely noisy by 1600 and terrible at 3200. Newer CMOS sensors are great in low light but commonly have color casts.

      • -N- says:

        The older digital cameras are really nice; I have often thought of buying something like the D700 just for that reason alone. I believe the digital Leicas up to the M9 used the CCD.

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