Film Photography

Fomapan 100 in cinematic scale

My Nikkormat EL’s shutter is capping, leaving a black stripe across the top of every photo. It was bummed to find it out after putting film through it. But I hated to waste the images, so I cropped them creatively to make the most I could out of them. My careful compositions could not be salvaged, but several of the photos remained interesting on some level anyway. 16×9 was the aspect ratio I used most. Here are a bunch of those cinematically scaled photographs, on Fomapan 100 through the 35-70mm f/3.3-4.5 Zoom Nikkor.

Downtown Indianapolis, the former L. S. Ayres building dappled with reflected evening sun.

Washington at Meridian

From the roof of the building in which I work in Downtown Indianapolis, looking northwest.

Downtown Indy

Through a conference-room window at work, looking at balconies in a neighboring building. It’s always amusing during a meeting when residents come out in their houseclothes, or sometimes even less, to sip coffee or sun themselves.

Balconies

Waterman Hardware, one of the oldest continually operating businesses in Indianapolis, on the Michigan Road southeast of Downtown.

Waterman's

The New Bethel Ordinary. I hear their pizza is to die for. Garlic and onions chew my insides alive so I’ll never find out. In Wanamaker, a community in far southeastern Indianapolis on the Michigan Road.

NBO

The New Bethel Ordinary’s patio. Spot the Michigan Road sign!

NBO

The northwest corner of Shelbyville’s Public Square. Another Michigan Road town.

Shelbyville on the Public Square

Some of these photos have a bottom-heavy feel to them given what I had to crop out. But as documentary photos they’re still okay.

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12 thoughts on “Fomapan 100 in cinematic scale

  1. Jim I think these work really well in 16:9, especially the first and third shots. Maybe you should try intenionally shooting in a more cinematic scale more often.

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  2. analogphotobug says:

    Had a recent film advance problem with one of my XD-11. I was able to make some interesting crops. The Camera, however, is headed for the parts box.

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  3. Shame about your EL. Fortunately, my EL is still kicking. I did have a FE where the shutter would only fire at M90 no matter what speed I had it set to, so I sent it to Midwest Camera Repair in MI. $180 for a CLA and shutter repair including return shipping back to WA. The only reasons I did it are that I love my FE, and it is in near mint condition.

    Agreed about the XD11. I have two and they fee like they were carved from a solid brick of metal. Probably due to the fact that Minolta developed it jointly with Leitz.

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    • It always makes me a little sad when one of my cameras develops a fault because I know that I’ll keep reaching for one of my other cameras rather than get the faulty one fixed. I have sent a few cameras out for CLA and repair but for most of them, when they break I let them go.

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      • I get it. I remember reading your review of the Nikkormat FTn, so its good you have a standby for that wonderful Nikon glass. Your review is actually the reason I kept a FTn I bought for $25 at a local thrift store. I already owned the EL and the FT2, so it just seemed right to add it to the stable. That, and having a backup for the others…

        The hard thing is to balance the cost of the repair with how cheaply and easily you can get another one. For now, the EL is still fairly cheap and plentiful.

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        • I also have a couple F2s and an F3 so I’m well set to shoot my Nikkor lenses!

          When I really like a camera, even one easily and cheaply replaced, I’ve decided to invest in a CLA and keep the camera for the long haul.

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