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Recommended reading

You know the drill.

💻 I love a good classic dystopian novel and have read many of them. I sometimes think about how they’re coming true. So does Eric Lawler, who compares modern times to Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451. Read Warnings from the past

📷 Johnny Martyr has some terrific advice, some technical and some practical, for making great candids at wedding receptions. A real insider view from a pro wedding photographer. Read Wedding Receptions on Film: No Flash, No Automation

Talbott Inn
Nikon FA, 35-70mm Zoom Nikkor, Agfa Vista 200, 2019.

💻 If you like Indiana’s National Road like I do, you’ll enjoy Richard Simpson‘s research on the 1940 alignment of US 40 between Dunreith and Knightstown. I’ve photographed the old alignment here. Simpson explains that it was built to eliminate a dangerous railroad crossing — and involved moving a river. Read US 40 at Knightstown

📷 Peggy Anne raves about her plastic, not-made-by-Nikon Nikon FM10. Read Nikon FM10

📷 So many camera reviews are written after a roll or two. Including mine. So I appreciate reviews written after someone has used a camera for a long time. Alan D. writes such a review of the Vivitar/Superheadz Ultra Wide and Slim and says the gear lives up to the hype. Read Filthy Beast – The Vivitar/Superheadz Wide and Slim Reappraised After 1,000 Shots

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3 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. I re-read Brave New World a couple of years ago; one perceives something completely different 45 years after a first reading… and shortly thereafter I encountered the photography of Bernard Prunesquallor. I’m not sure if the current insanity is closer to BNW, or we’ve marched down the path laid out in almost anything written by Sinclair Lewis…. The demise of rationality and civility is far more subtle and insidious than the likes of F451 or 1984. Remember The Prisoner?

    • I do remember The Prisoner. I am not a number, I am a free man!

      F451 got the vidscreens right. BNW turned out to be prophetic and 1984 — the one we all feared most back then — to be implausible.

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