Bridge on Prince William Road
Xenia Bridge, Carroll County, Indiana
Bridge at IMA
Big Jim Bridge, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis
Barrel shot
Piano Factory Bridge, St. Charles, Illinois
Dicks Road Bridge
Dicks Road Bridge, Putnam County, Indiana
Medora Covered Bridge
Medora Covered Bridge, Medora, Indiana
Bridge at Devil's Elbow
Devil’s Elbow Bridge, Pulaski County, Missouri
The bridge on Holliday Road
O’Neal Bridge, Boone County, Indiana
Spencer bridge
Johnson Creek Bridge, Lawrence County, Missouri
Bridge on State Road 225
Jewettsport Ford Bridge, Tippecanoe County, Indiana
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Preservation, Road Trips

Truss shadows

Shadows cast through steel and iron bridge trusses.

Image

16 thoughts on “Truss shadows

  1. There’s something very ‘American’ about that style of bridge, I don’t think I’ve ever seen them anywhere else – brilliant pieces of engineering.

    Great shots, I don’t think I’d want to WALK across the Medora bridge, let alone drive it!

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  2. peggy says:

    Thanks for the trip down memory lane (no pun intended). As Stuart Templeton says, these icons of the 20th century are very American. Thank you for documenting them in your corner of the world, and doing so with a keen photographic eye.

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  3. Theron says:

    My favorite is definitely the O’Neal. Love the artistic little sunburst thingies (?) in the corner braces.

    I find it interesting that, unlike here in Oklahoma, your Indiana bridges have fresh paint and seem to be in good repair. All of ours are rusty and show damage from tall load truck strikes on the front cross beams.

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  4. That’s a great collection of truss bridges. Always fun to play with their shadows. We have some nice ones in New Mexico including the Rio Puerco bridge not far up Route 66 from us.

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  5. DougD says:

    Fun stuff, I do like riveted truss bridges. There are some pretty cool videos online of how it’s done.

    I only see a plaque on the Jewettsport bridge, too bad because I always like to see who built the bridge (and where the beams were rolled).

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