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Recommended reading

Good heavens was it ever cold in Indiana earlier this week! On Wednesday it was -2 for the high. Today it’s going to be 50. As we’ve said for years here in Indiana, if you don’t like the weather, wait five minutes. Meanwhile, read these blog posts I liked from this week.

Shadows in my room
Canon PowerShot S95, 2013.

💻 Baseball has been broadcast on radio since 1921, but in Colorado Springs in 1947 local broadcasters had a novel, if not quite honest, way of bringing fans distant games at a time before the networks reached that far. David Lacy not only explains, but was part of the ruse. Read Major League Ball in the Springs

💻 A physician who volunteers for duty in Africa has returned for another tour. He writes as Dr. Alfred Prunesquallor and shares this time the joy of being back in Zambia. Read First day at the Clinic

💻 I love the music of Glenn Miller. J.P. Cavanaugh introduces us to a Benny Goodman version of a song probably best known by Miller — and the Goodman version trounces Miller’s. Hear them both: Read Battle of the Bands — Miller vs. Goodman and Two Strings of Pearls

📷 I’d never heard of the Cosina CX-2 before. It’s a compact camera about the same size as an Olympus XA. Hamish Gill reviews one. Read The Cosina CX-2 – an ingenious bit of industrial design

📷 Alan D. shares 10 cameras with undeserved bad reps. Read 10 ‘Crap’ Cameras that are actually quite good

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8 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. Heide says:

    “Dr. Prunesquallor”? What a fantastic pen name! And what a fantastic blog too — thank you so much for sharing it, Jim. Also loved J.P.’s piece (as always) even if I’m not as educated about music as you two are. And what’s not to love about crap cameras that are actually quite good? The title alone makes it worthy of your recommended reading roundup. Thank you, and enjoy the tropical weekend!

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  2. It is always a thrill to make the cut for DTR’s Saturday Roundup.

    I recall Ronald Reagan telling a story about broadcasting a baseball game early in his career, although his station may have had a ticker tape feed. The feed stopped in the middle of the game and he quickly decided that the only way to stall that would not show up in the box scores of the newspaper the next day was to call a series of (nonexistent) foul balls. He was relieved when the game feed resumed and he was able to catch up.

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    • It wasn’t uncommon in those days for stations to recreate games in realtime from wire reports. I’ve read other accounts of it. It was just cool that someone I know from the blogosphere participated in it!

      Really enjoyed it that you introduced me to Goodman’s version of that song.

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  3. Never heard of the Cosina CX-2? Did you know that Cosina has made cameras/lenses for pretty much every major camera maker? Cosina is probably the industry’s best kept secret! Thanks for the link to this post though, I’m about to read it!

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  4. Just to say I really like the photograph of the bed and window, I love minimal shots like this. And the fact that it appears to be either a bare mattress or a perfectly uncrumpled sheet adds two further possible stories…

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    • Oh thank you! I love this shot too. I made it in my bedroom at my old house with my Canon S95. It struggled a little with the low light and so there’s some pixelation in the lower third or so of the photo. You only notice it at larger display sizes, though. I’ll bet I could smooth it out considerably in Photoshop if I tried. Anyway, the bed is made; the light is spilling onto my quilted bedspread. I suppose knowing that makes the photo a little less evocative.

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