Hanging Rock Hill

Hanging Rock Hill
Kodak EasyShare Z730 Zoom
2008

As you look out across Indiana, the primary feature is the horizon. This is a pretty flat state.

Except in the southernmost counties. The Ice Age’s glaciers stopped short of them and therefore did not flatten them. There are quite some hills down there.

You’ll find a few rock formations in southern Indiana. Like this one, Hanging Rock Hill, on State Road 7 in the Ohio River town of Madison. My little red car in the photo gives a good sense of this outcropping’s scale.

Much of the year water falls down the face of the rock, but on this visit a hot, dry spell had dried up the water.

There are old photographs of Hanging Rock Hill that show the road running under it! Those photographs show a steep dropoff at road’s edge, suggesting that constructing the modern highway meant considerably building out this hill.

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Photography, Road Trips

single frame: Hanging Rock Hill

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14 thoughts on “single frame: Hanging Rock Hill

  1. Two posts at the same time Jim? Thought you were thinking of lessening your posts!

    This reminds me of a program over here a few months back, I can’t recall where it was in the US, but there are huge rock formations that people have carved into to form houses, indeed whole communities. The focus of the documentary was on the relationships and most men having two or three wives and many children. But the landscape was almost as fascinating – and just as unusual to a monogamous husband living in little old England!

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    • I spent a few hours last weekend writing ten posts for this week, to help my writing muscle come back from atrophy!

      I can’t imagine having more than one wife. One is plenty.

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      • Add a child or two and yes, I can’t disagree. : )

        I absolutely understand why you would write a lot to get your writing muscles working again, but I can’t see any benefit of publishing two posts together. Why not make one a day later (or even 12 hours later) and have more in your scheduled queue? Just curious about your gameplan with this approach Jim.

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        • You presuppose that I thought about it very much! Sometimes when I need to prime the pump, if you will, I just do a different kind of week. Two posts each morning at the usual time seemed different enough. And I’ve got the road-trip itch and so looking back through old road photos was pleasant. I found these ten, and reprocessed each in Photoshop (based on my increased skill over when these photos were new) and wrote out whatever came to mind about them. Mission accomplished!

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        • I like the idea of mixing it up now and then! Great to hear the exercise worked too.

          (It would be interesting to compare viewing/comment stats of the two posts in a week or two and see whether there are any patterns. But that’s just the stats geek in me talking!)

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        • First-day post views are down. Comments are down too. Every time I do an all-photo week, this happens. That’s the price to pay I suppose.

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        • I have found similar with my limited experiments so far with one frame posts. Far fewer comments, I guess because I’m not presenting a topic and then asking for people’s thoughts on it.

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        • There just isn’t as much to say about a photograph. “Nice colors” or “nice tones” or whatever. This is when the Like button is valuable to me — it lets people acknowledge that they enjoyed the photo without having to come up with something to say about it.

          Once in a while I’ll write a mini essay on a single frame post, a riff on something the photo made me think of. Those single frame posts get the most comments.

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        • Yeh because people have a story to connect with and relate and respond to. My single frame photos tend to be more abstract, not for example of a particular street or building that people might be familiar with, or that has a story. So yes I guess we’re never going to get lengthy comments around these kind of photos. Doesn’t mean they’re not appreciated.

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  2. Pingback: single frame: Hanging Rock Hill — Down the Road – Teibot

  3. Roger Meade says:

    A few years ago my wife and I visited Canyon de Chelly National Monument on Navajo lands in Arizona. We took a tour back into the canyon on a converted army 6-by truck that had rows of seats for tourists on the bed. The truck was driven by a Navajo guide well back into one arm of the canyon. It was pretty much an all day trip as the truck must go slow over rough sand tracks, but well worth the time. At one spot we parked under a similar rock overhang, carved by wind, or water, or both. Even that big truck was a tiny toy parked under thousands of tons of red sandstone.

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