Blogosphere

Recommended reading

At last, here it is: this week’s best blog posts, as judged by me.

A fascinating story of how a fellow’s dad’s 1971 Dodge Dart served in the 1973 Yom Kippur War in Israel. Yohai71 writing for Curbside Classic. Read COAL: 1971 Dodge Dart – Above and Beyond the Original Brief

Lanier Mansion

Lanier Mansion, Madison, Indiana
Canon PowerShot S80

Ann Althouse considers whether Facebook is truly evil for how it tends to tribe us up. Don’t let the post title trip you up: she thinks there can be value in helping us find people who share our worldview. Read Can we just say it? Facebook is evil. Its entire raison d’etre is the balkanization of communities and nations in pursuit of financial profit.

I wrote recently about how Facebook is like an abusive relationship: good just often enough that you stay. Derek Sivers has had enough of the abuse, namely the abuse of his personal data. So he deleted the app. His argument is nudging me closer to doing the same. Read Why I deleted Facebook

Stephen Dowling shares his insightful thoughts about why the era of cheap color film is probably coming to an end. Yet he urges Kodak and Ferrania to bring out, or bring back, ISO 100 color emulsions. Read After Agfa Vista 200: The Colour Film We Need Now

This week’s camera reviews and experience reports:

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9 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. Well, I deleted Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram two years ago when they changed their privacy policy. They are doing whatever they want and I do not need to support this.

    For me, the Facebook scandal is one thing … nothing I’m surprised about. The more serious one is the story about how this Cambridge Analytics deal began and how this crime developed. This is what should us worry far more.

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    • I’ve done little more on FB for years than share my blog and write an occasional pithy status update. I don’t feel terribly at risk — except for what the FB app can suck in from my phone. The Cambridge Analytica story does spook me considerably.

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  2. The Facebook backlash grows! Re Derek Sivers he is so often such a voice of reason, isn’t he? As I said on your Facebook blog post the other day Jim, you have quite an influence on your readers, don’t underestimate that. You could begin a slow withdrawal from using Facebook, let your readers know why and subtly encourage them to consider doing the same… 🙂

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    • ATM it’s a form of virtue signaling to say you deleted FB and I find virtue signaling to be distasteful. I did delete the app from my phone at about the same time the Cambridge Analytica story broke. But I did it because I’d seen one more gun-control (pro or con, doesn’t matter) post from a connection there and I finally decided I’d had enough. I still check FB once or twice a day from my regular computer because I do want to see what response is to my blog there and there are a couple groups I follow — and I’m an admin on two other groups for organizations I support.

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