Blogosphere

Recommended reading

Here’s this week’s recommended reading from the blogs I follow.

John Smith considers the pressure to keep upgrading to the newest gear when vintage equipment works just fine. Read: New and Improved

Michael Lopp (who writes as Rands), earned a badge of honor for an inelegant hack during his early days as a programmer. Read: Hacking on Mtrek

Walking along a beach in New South Wales, Australia, 52 Rolls participant Peter DeGraaff shot macro with a vintage Olympus SLR. Read: Woods and beach

I have a soft spot in my heart for AM radio because it’s where I got my pro-radio start. Paul Riismandel writing for Radio Survivor tells us why AM talk radio is killing itself. Read: The Death Spiral of AM Talk Radio

And finally, I told a story about my grandmother over at Curbside Classic after I found a duplicate of the ’72 Chevy Blazer she used to drive. Read: 1972 Chevrolet K/5 Blazer CST – Don’t Mess With Grandma

Advertisements
Standard

6 thoughts on “Recommended reading

  1. Some good reading. I thought the AM links were particularly interesting. When I was a kid AM was all there was. I enjoyed being able to listen to stations from all over the country. Most stations had distinct personalities back then. Now when I rarely flip the AM dial it seems like it is mostly a mix of conservative talk shows. One of our local AM stations, which still does carry Rush and the gang, has recently added a younger more moderate woman to their morning crew. She seems to get the old white guys worked up, however everyone else seems to like her. So maybe they are adapting. The station WDWS is still locally owned and I believe still usually wins the local ratings in the morning.

    Like

    • I think that when the government deregulated the airwaves, it triggered the beginning of the end of radio as we know it because radio companies nationwide consolidated, and it became more about running a corporation then running radio stations. Like the article points out, so many decisions that used to be made at the local level to serve the local community are made a corporate level to serve corporate goals. As much as I truly love radio, I hardly ever listen anymore – hardly any of it reaches me anymore.

      Like

Share your comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.