History, Road Trips

The National Road in western Indiana

I blogged for weeks last year about my August trip down the National Road (US 40) from Indianapolis to the Illinois line. I shared stories, facts, and photos of the former alignments, neon signs, old bridges, grand homes, and faded towns. It was a great trip!

But, you see, I didn’t share everything. There are more former alignments, more neon signs, more old bridges, more grand homes, and more faded towns just waiting for you if you’ll kindly click:

The National Road in Western Indiana, Revisited

You will instantly be transported to jimgrey.net, where waits for you my usual obsessively detailed rundown of the entire route.

(And if you like, you can compare it to my writeup of my first road trip, which was down the same road. I’ve learned a lot about the old roads since then!)

Corner Grind
Highland Lawn
Plainfield, IN
Advertisements
Standard

2 thoughts on “The National Road in western Indiana

  1. Cameron Miller says:

    In your write-up on the Plainfield segment of the National Road you posed what I’ll call the “Buchanan St. question”. A number of months ago while poring over modern aerial photos, I had similar thoughts, wondering if Buchanan St was part of an earlier alignment. Upon closer inspection (and without the luxury of actual on-site observation) I concluded that it was probably part of an abandoned railroad right-of-way. Have a look westward beyond present US 40 and it looks suspiciously abandoned railroadish.

    I’m very curious to know more. Perhaps I will visit there soon to have a closer look or maybe a more-informed reader will be kind enough to offer us some tidbits of greater enlightenment.

    Like

    • Cameron, I received e-mail the other day from a former Plainfield resident who saw my writeup. He said that this was, as you guessed, a former rail alignment — specifically, it was the interurban right-of-way.

      Like

Share your comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.