A lane in the cemetery

A lane in the cemetery
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

If you think I’m milking this roll of Velvia I shot at Crown Hill Cemetery, you’re right.

Since our pastor quit at church, I’ve been attending a lot more meetings, and I had to prepare for my sermon last Sunday. It went fine, by the way. But it takes time and energy away from the blog.

Just you wait: on Monday I’m going to share the images from this roll that didn’t work out. They’re interesting in their own right.

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Film Photography

single frame: A lane in the cemetery

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At the gate

At the gate
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

The south entrance to Crown Hill Cemetery is down a side street off 38th Street in Indianapolis. The entrance is a giant concrete affair built in 1885, with several peaked arches and this blue-green gate. I like this gate and have photographed it many times.

I’ve put more rolls of film through my Yashica-12 this year than any other camera. As I’ve taught myself to develop black-and-white film this year, I reached for the 12 because of its excellent image quality. It’s been on my desk ever since, so it was a no-brainer to load this roll of Velvia into it.

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Film Photography

single frame: At the gate

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Autumn trees at Crown Hill

Autumn trees at Crown Hill
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

I went to Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis to photograph autumn color. But most trees were still green; peak was two weeks away. That Saturday afternoon would be the only day I could get away for this photo trip, and I knew it, so I acted.

I used to live a couple miles from Crown Hill and visited it often for photography. I’ve lived in Zionsville, 15 miles away, for two years now and miss visiting the place. But that’s no excuse. My house and Crown Hill are both right by exits of Interstate 65. Especially in the light traffic of a Saturday afternoon I can be there in 20 minutes.

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Film Photography

single frame: Autumn trees at Crown Hill

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Riley's rest

Riley’s rest
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

Many people who visit Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis stop here, at the top of the highest hill in the city. This is where Hoosier poet James Whitcomb Riley is buried.

It’s hard to contemplate now, but Riley was as popular as any rock star in his day. Throngs would come to listen to him speak. His death in 1916 saddened the nation.

Riley had an unusually large presence in my life as I attended a high school in South Bend that was named for him. It was built just eight years after he died.

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Film Photography

single frame: Riley’s rest

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Unknown U.S. Soldier

Unknown U.S. Soldier
Yashica-12
Fujifilm Velvia (expired 8-2006)

The military cemetery within Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis is one of the largest in the nation. Countless rows of little markers just like this line a large section of the grounds.

In past visits I’ve looked and looked for an Unknown marker to photograph, always to no success. This time I was just walking by and caught this one out of the corner of my eye.

I cut the in-focus patch just a shade too thin on this photo. The marker is in focus but the fake flowers right in front of it are not.

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Film Photography

single frame: Unknown U.S. Soldier

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